The Antioxidant

The Antioxidant

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Bienfaits de l'antioxydant

During ageing, the body, and particularly the skin, defends itself less well against environmental aggressions (UV rays, pollution, stress, diet, etc.). The cause: less efficient cellular defence mechanisms against free radicals.

Based on the 9 identified causes of ageing and with bioavailable actives with targeted action, it becomes possible to act at the root by going as far as to protect our genetic heritage.

60 capsules • 2 capsules per day

€24.90


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100% vegan
100% vegan
sans gluten
gluten free
sans ogm
gmo free
sans additifs
without addictives
sans gélatine
without gelatin
fabriqué en France
made in France

A combination of 3 antioxidants to target cell aging

A combination of 3 antioxidants to target cell aging

EFFICIENCY

Never has our promise "to live better, more intensely" made so much sense...

Broccoli extract with epigenetic properties

Sulforaphane is a molecule that fascinates researchers, particularly for its ability to protect the expression of our genome. After 20 years of research that led to the filing of 2 patents, it is finally possible to obtain it in a stable form and in its natural matrix: broccoli. 2 capsules of the Antioxidant provide as much Sulforaphane as 190g of raw broccoli.

The best OPC of grapes Made in France

Our grape extract is standardized in polyphenols, including 50% OPC (ProCyanidolic Oligomers). It mainly contains 20% of so-called "monomer" forms, whose bioavailability is higher than any other polyphenol, including EGCg (Epicatechins) from green tea. OPCs have many virtues, including the protection of telomeres, which themselves guarantee the integrity of our DNA.

A coenzyme Q10 with increased bioavailability

Coenzyme Q10 is known for its major cellular role in energy production, but with aging, our production of Q10 decreases. Our patented form provides the equivalent of 360mg of standard CoQ10 in 2 capsules.

BENEFITS

The benefits of antioxidants are numerous, both at the cellular level and at a more visible level:

  • Polyphenols extracted from grape seeds support cell membranes against the destructive actions of free radicals (280 mg per day for 30 days)
  • Vitamin C protects cells against oxidative stress (12 mg per day)
  • Regular consumption of grape seed polyphenols helps improve skin health and appearance (150 mg per day)
  • Vitamin C contributes to the normal formation of collagen for normal skin function (12 mg per day)
  • Broccoli seed extract (Sulforaphane) has been the subject of more than 800 published studies on its role on the antioxidant sphere.

USAGE TIPS

When to take your Antioxidant ?

We advise you to take your capsules at breakfast.

How to take your capsules?

It's very simple, you have to take your capsules with a big glass of water.

How many capsules do you take? ?

We recommend 2 capsules per day.

Storage conditions

Storage in the fridge: Stability tests carried out on Sulfodyne® (stabilized sulforaphane extract) have shown that the optimal storage conditions are 4 to 8°C (see FAQ).

Precautions

People with hypothyroidism or thyroid treatment should seek medical advice before supplementation.
Pregnant or breastfeeding women should seek medical advice before supplementation.

COMPOSITION

For 2 capsules

Grape seed extract(GRAP'INSIDE®) (Vitis vinifera L.): 360 mg
  including OPC: 180 mg
  including epicatechines / Monomers: 72 mg

Sulfodyne® (Brassica oleracea italica): 120 mg
  of which broccoli extract: 18 mg
  of which stabilized sulforaphane: 5 mg

CavaQ10: 100 mg
  of which Q10: 20 mg

Vitamin C: 12 mg

SCIENCE

Antioxidants and Aging

We hear about the benefits of antioxidants every day. But who exactly are they? And why are they so essential to our health?

Antioxidants are primarily preventive. They protect the body at the cellular level, primarily against free radical damage, which is released by cells during the normal functioning of our bodies.

So far, so good: A healthy, functioning body emits potentially harmful entities, but these are detected and neutralized by our cells. Cells are therefore our first line of defence, protecting and repairing our biological systems [4]. These defence mechanisms are extremely complex and involve many molecules, which are called Antioxidants because they fight against the oxidizing (destructive) power of free radicals. In particular, they are involved in a multitude of "redox" cycles (a cascade of oxidation-reduction reactions). Our body produces many Antioxidants directly, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase, coenzyme Q10...

Unfortunately, over time and due to external factors such as pollution, UV rays, diet... these harmful free radicals can become too numerous and overwhelm the antioxidant mechanisms of the cells. Especially since at the same time, our production of these antioxidant molecules declines, the redox cycles are disrupted, our defences become less efficient... This is precisely what we call "ageing". 1,2].

Nine brands have thus been proposed as the imprint of ageing. These can directly affect our genetic material, i.e. our DNA (genomic instability, reduction of the sites at the base of our chromosomes - the famous telomeres - epigenetic alterations), our protein balance (functional properties of proteins), our nutrient sensitivity mechanisms, our mitochondrial functions, our cell renewal and regeneration processes, and finally, our cellular communication mechanisms [3].

Focus on one mark of ageing: the skin.

During physiological ageing, the appearance and structure of our skin is particularly affected (notably less collagen: appearance of wrinkles and loss of elasticity). Below the surface, at the cellular level, our skin also becomes more sensitive to environmental "aggressions" (UV rays, toxins, pollution...), and less effective in fighting oxidative stress (emission of the famous free radicals). The visible signs of ageing are then likely to become more apparent and more numerous, and may even induce changes in composition, structure, elasticity and pigmentation [7,8]. This explains why the skin is a major site of antioxidant activity in the human body.

If the body no longer sufficiently manages free radicals to protect cells, and in order to limit the phenomena of ageing, it should therefore be supported by an external supply of dietary antioxidants or Nutraceuticals. This is particularly important for the skin [9,10].

But which Nutraceutical Antioxidants to choose? ?

Until today the approach of "antioxidant" products has always been the same: to bring orally a molecule that will "capture" free radicals. The idea being that as we age, we produce fewer free radical scavengers, so we can provide them directly. So you can imagine the shallot race, with the aim of finding the most powerful antioxidant, the one that will capture the maximum of free radicals. All of this, of course, measured by a laboratory test under totally artificial conditions (ORAC test and ORAC index). If this strategy seems intuitively interesting, it has two major flaws:

  1. The cause is not tackled but the consequences. Indeed, the decline in antioxidant production is a direct result of cellular aging, primarily at the genomic level. We do not take into account the complexity of the body's antioxidant mechanisms. Each of these antioxidants acts within a collective, in Redox cycles (a cascade of oxidation and reduction reactions). Bringing just one element among the many molecules involved is at best useless, at worst harmful (because it can disturb the balance of these Redox cycles).

And not even all of these supposedly overpowering antioxidants with poor stability or bioavailability are mentioned (have you ever heard of Glutathione?). You're being sold an antioxidant with an ORAC number that's going through the roof? Ask yourself a simple question: OK it works great in the lab, on a probe, but what happens in the body is a whole different story, much more complex: so where are the clinical data?

By targeting the causes of aging rather than the consequences, a new approach is possible. This approach allows the body to maintain its own defense systems and the balance of its antioxidant mechanisms. This ambition requires molecules that act at the genomic scale, protecting telomeres and gene expression (epigenetics).

And in order to design a truly effective antioxidant in capsules, it is also necessary to control these parameters:

  • Understanding the mechanism of action,
  • Guaranteed bioavailability and stability,
  • Efficacy demonstrated by clinical studies.

So how did we do?

Sulforaphane - the antioxidant "star" of the scientific community

Broccoli is not the best known antioxidant food, but for many years researchers have been studying the effects of a fascinating small molecule extracted from it: Sulforaphane. The scientific community's interest in the beneficial effects of sulforaphane has increased particularly in the last 10 years. Its protective effect against the ageing process is now rather well established thanks to its powerful antioxidant role with nutrigenomic properties, thus getting to the root of the problem (action on gene expression) [15]. Sulforaphane is capable of - activating phase II enzymes responsible for the antioxidant response and metabolism of xenobiotics (toxic compounds such as reactive oxygen species): "detoxification pathway" and - inhibiting phase I enzymes, enzymes responsible for the activation of xenobiotics. It is also capable of inhibiting the processes involved in the pro-inflammatory response (NF-κB pathway). Finally, Sulforaphane may be able to inhibit epigenetic processes by which the expression of our genes is modified and to protect our protein system by protecting its activities and functions [16,17]. One of the latest publications on all the scientific work carried out on Sulforaphane reports that its beneficial effects can be observed as early as 1.8 mg of pure Sulforaphane per day [18].

The clinical efficacy as well as the mechanism of action are thus validated. What about bioavailability?

When consuming foods rich in Sulforaphane precursors (cruciferae, cabbage, broccoli) and after an enzymatic action of myrosinase, the precursor called glucoraphanin is hydrolyzed into Sulforaphane from the microbiota of the small intestine.

Today and after a necessary development period of more than 20 years (!!!!), the direct use of Sulforaphane is finally possible and in optimal conditions guaranteeing its bioavailability AND stability, through the introduction of Sulfodyne® (from broccoli) in our Antioxidant. This unique and Made In France innovation has led to the filing of 2 patents. So for the first time a broccoli extract, standardised in Sulforaphane, ticks all the boxes for nutraceutical efficacy :

  • Mechanism of action ☑︎
  • Bioavailability ☑︎
  • Clinical efficacy ☑︎

To give you some benchmarks for comparison:

  • 2 capsules of our Antioxidant provide as much Sulforaphane as 190g of raw broccoli daily.
  • Numerous broccoli extracts are available and praise its antioxidant properties. However, these extracts contain at best only precursors of Sulforaphane, with extremely low or even zero conversion depending on the person. If you are promised glucoraphanin - and count 25 mg of this precursor to have 1 mg of Sulforaphane in the best case ...

Polyphenols extracted from grape seeds

Grape extracts are naturally rich in polyphenols including anthocyanins, flavonols, stilbenes (including resveratrol) and phenolic acids. Different polyphenol profiles exist depending on the part of the grape used. The seeds contain the highest percentage of active polyphenols: flavonols and anthocyanins [19], giving these polyphenol-rich extracts a high antioxidant potential [20]. Although the mechanisms of action are difficult to elucidate, grape polyphenols could have a positive influence on telomere length and those present in the seeds could protect DNA integrity (fighting DNA damage) by effectively participating in the elimination of free radicals [21,22]. The structure of polyphenols should be considered for optimal efficacy. Indeed, 82% of flavonol monomers would be absorbed, against only 1% for polymers, ensuring better distribution to body tissues. Epicatechin (flavonol monomer), whose bioavailability is high, is notably present in significant quantities (≥ 20%) in the selected extract: GRAP'INSIDEâ. So you can understand why we have selected this particular extract.

  • Mechanism of action ☑︎
  • Biodavailability ☑︎
  • Clinical efficacy ☑︎

Coenzyme Q10 (Q10)

CoQ10, also known as ubiquinone or coenzyme Q10, is a central compound involved in mitochondrial electron transport and thus in energy production and membrane activity [23]. During the aging process, the biosynthesis of CoQ10 by the body decreases. The additional CoQ10 supply could therefore influence oxidative damage to the core molecules of our cells and functions: lipids, proteins and DNA [24,25]. The "ideal" doses of CoQ10 applicable for an "anti-aging" cure would be difficult to define, but studies report that as early as 100 mg per day, the effects would be notable [24,26]. Moreover, these beneficial effects are often blocked by the difficulties of CoQ10 to reach the blood circulation when taken orally. This is why complexation with cyclodextrins allows CoQ10 to become soluble and therefore bioavailable [27,28]. Thanks to the CavaQ10 complex, a process of encapsulation of CoQ10 (ubiquinone, stable form) in cyclodextrins, bioavailability becomes 18 times higher than that of the compound alone. Considering that CavaQ10 contains 20% CoQ10 and that its bioavailability is 18 times higher, our Antioxidant therefore provides the equivalent of 360 mg of CoQ10 for 2 capsules. Here too:

  • Mechanism of action ☑︎
  • Bioavailability ☑︎
  • Clinical efficacy ☑︎

Publications

  1. Barouki, R. Stress oxydant et vieillissement. médecine/sciences 2006, 22, 266–272, doi:10.1051/medsci/2006223266.
  2. Bonnefont-Rousselot, D. Stress oxydant et vieillissement. 2007,
  3. López-Otín, C.; Blasco, M.A.; Partridge, L.; Serrano, M.; Kroemer, G. The Hallmarks of Aging. Cell 2013, 153, 1194–1217, doi:10.1016/j.cell.2013.05.039.
  4. Liguori, I.; Russo, G.; Curcio, F.; Bulli, G.; Aran, L.; Della-Morte, D.; Gargiulo, G.; Testa, G.; Cacciatore, F.; Bonaduce, D.; et al. Oxidative stress, aging, and diseases. Clin. Interv. Aging 2018, Volume 13, 757–772, doi:10.2147/CIA.S158513.
  5. Conti, V.; Izzo, V.; Corbi, G.; Russomanno, G.; Manzo, V.; De Lise, F.; Di Donato, A.; Filippelli, A. Antioxidant Supplementation in the Treatment of Aging-Associated Diseases. Front. Pharmacol. 2016, 7, doi:10.3389/fphar.2016.00024.
  6. Tan, B.L.; Norhaizan, M.E.; Liew, W.-P.-P.; Sulaiman Rahman, H. Antioxidant and Oxidative Stress: A Mutual Interplay in Age-Related Diseases. Front. Pharmacol. 2018, 9, 1162, doi:10.3389/fphar.2018.01162.
  7. Rinnerthaler, M.; Bischof, J.; Streubel, M.; Trost, A.; Richter, K. Oxidative Stress in Aging Human Skin. Biomolecules 2015, 5, 545–589, doi:10.3390/biom5020545.
  8. Dunaway, S.; Odin, R.; Zhou, L.; Ji, L.; Zhang, Y.; Kadekaro, A.L. Natural Antioxidants: Multiple Mechanisms to Protect Skin From Solar Radiation. Front. Pharmacol. 2018, 9, 392, doi:10.3389/fphar.2018.00392.
  9. Addor, F.A.S. Antioxidants in dermatology. An. Bras. Dermatol. 2017, 92, 356–362, doi:10.1590/abd1806-4841.20175697.
  10. Petruk, G.; Del Giudice, R.; Rigano, M.M.; Monti, D.M. Antioxidants from Plants Protect against Skin Photoaging. Oxid. Med. Cell. Longev. 2018, 11, doi:https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1454936.
  11. Guilland, J.-C. Les interactions entre les vitamines A, D, E et K : synergie et/ou compétition. Ol. Corps Gras Lipides 2011, 18, 59–67, doi:10.1051/ocl.2011.0376.
  12. Dutra, M.T.; Martins, W.R.; Ribeiro, A.L.A.; Bottaro, M. The Effects of Strength Training Combined with Vitamin C and E Supplementation on Skeletal Muscle Mass and Strength: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. J. Sports Med. 2020, 2020, 1–9, doi:10.1155/2020/3505209.
  13. Nikolaidis, M.G.; Kerksick, C.M.; Lamprecht, M.; McAnulty, S.R. Does Vitamin C and E Supplementation Impair the Favorable Adaptations of Regular Exercise? Oxid. Med. Cell. Longev. 2012, 2012, 1–11, doi:10.1155/2012/707941.
  14. Cory, H.; Passarelli, S.; Szeto, J.; Tamez, M.; Mattei, J. The Role of Polyphenols in Human Health and Food Systems: A Mini-Review. Front. Nutr. 2018, 5, 87, doi:10.3389/fnut.2018.00087.
  15. Houghton, C.A. Sulforaphane: Its “Coming of Age” as a Clinically Relevant Nutraceutical in the Prevention and Treatment of Chronic Disease. Oxid. Med. Cell. Longev. 2019, 2019, 1–27, doi:10.1155/2019/2716870.
  16. Juge, N.; Mithen, R.F.; Traka, M. Molecular basis for chemoprevention by sulforaphane: a comprehensive review. Cell. Mol. Life Sci. 2007, 64, 1105–1127, doi:10.1007/s00018-007-6484-5.
  17. Santín-Márquez, R.; Alarcón-Aguilar, A.; López-Diazguerrero, N.E.; Chondrogianni, N.; Königsberg, M. Sulforaphane - role in aging and neurodegeneration. GeroScience 2019, 41, 655–670, doi:10.1007/s11357-019-00061-7.
  18. Yagishita, Y.; Fahey, J.W.; Dinkova-Kostova, A.T.; Kensler, T.W. Broccoli or Sulforaphane: Is It the Source or Dose That Matters? Molecules 2019, 24, 3593, doi:10.3390/molecules24193593.
  19. Xia, E.-Q.; Deng, G.-F.; Guo, Y.-J.; Li, H.-B. Biological Activities of Polyphenols from Grapes. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2010, 11, 622–646, doi:10.3390/ijms11020622.
  20. Ma, Z.; Zhang, H. Phytochemical Constituents, Health Benefits, and Industrial Applications of Grape Seeds: A Mini-Review. Antioxidants 2017, 6, 71, doi:10.3390/antiox6030071.
  21. Yen, C.-Y.; Hou, M.-F.; Yang, Z.-W.; Tang, J.-Y.; Li, K.-T.; Huang, H.-W.; Huang, Y.-H.; Lee, S.-Y.; Fu, T.-F.; Hsieh, C.-Y.; et al. Concentration effects of grape seed extracts in anti-oral cancer cells involving differential apoptosis, oxidative stress, and DNA damage. BMC Complement. Altern. Med. 2015, 15, 94, doi:10.1186/s12906-015-0621-8.
  22. Vidaček, N.Š.; Nanić, L.; Ravlić, S.; Sopta, M.; Gerić, M.; Gajski, G.; Garaj-Vrhovac, V.; Rubelj, I. Telomeres, Nutrition, and Longevity: Can We Really Navigate Our Aging? J. Gerontol. Ser. A 2018, 73, 39–47, doi:10.1093/gerona/glx082.
  23. Hernández-Camacho, J.D.; Bernier, M.; López-Lluch, G.; Navas, P. Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation in Aging and Disease. Front. Physiol. 2018, 9, 44, doi:10.3389/fphys.2018.00044.
  24. Varela-López, A.; Giampieri, F.; Battino, M.; Quiles, J. Coenzyme Q and Its Role in the Dietary Therapy against Aging. Molecules 2016, 21, 373, doi:10.3390/molecules21030373.
  25. Barcelos, I.P. de; Haas, R.H. CoQ10 and Aging. Biology 2019, 8, 28, doi:10.3390/biology8020028.
  26. Casagrande, D.; Waib, P.H.; Jordão Júnior, A.A. Mechanisms of action and effects of the administration of Coenzyme Q10 on metabolic syndrome. J. Nutr. Intermed. Metab. 2018, 13, 26–32, doi:10.1016/j.jnim.2018.08.002.
  27. Terao, K.; Nakata, D.; Fukumi, H.; Schmid, G.; Arima, H.; Hirayama, F.; Uekama, K. Enhancement of oral bioavailability of coenzyme Q10 by complexation with γ-cyclodextrin in healthy adults. Nutr. Res. 2006, 26, 503–508, doi:10.1016/j.nutres.2006.08.004.
  28. Bank, G.; Kagan, D.; Madhavi, D. Coenzyme Q 10 : Clinical Update and Bioavailability. J. Evid.-Based Complement. Altern. Med. 2011, 16, 129–137, doi:10.1177/2156587211399438.
EFFICIENCY
BENEFITS
USAGE TIPS
COMPOSITION
SCIENCE

Never has our promise "to live better, more intensely" made so much sense..

Broccoli extract with epigenetic properties
Sulforaphane is a molecule that fascinate researchers, particularly for its ability to protect the expression of our genome. After 20 years of research that led to the filing of 2 patents, it is finally possible to obtain it in a stable form and in its natural matrix: broccoli. 2 capsules of the Antioxidant provide as much Sulforaphane as 190g of raw broccoli. 

The best OPC of grapes Made in France
Our grape extract is standarized in polyphenols, including 50% OPC (ProCyanidolic Oligomers). It mainly contains 20% of so-called "monomer" forms, whose bioavailability is higher than any other polyphenol, including EGCg (Epicatechins) from green tea. OPCs have many virtues, including the protection of telomeres, which themselves guarantee the integrity of our DNA.

A coenzyme Q10 with increased bioavailability
Coenzyme Q10 is known for its major cellular role in energy production, but with aging, our production of Q10 decreases. Our patented form provides the equivalent of 360mg of standard CoQ10 in 2 capsules.

The benefits of antioidants are numerous, both at the cellular level and at a more visible level: 

  • Polyphenols extracted from grape seeds support cell membranes against the destructive actions of free radicals (280 mg per day for 30 days)
  • Vitamin C protects cells against oxidative strss (12 mg per day)
  • Regular consumption of grape seed polyphenols helps improve skin health and appearance (150 mg per day)
  • Vitamin C contributes to the normal formation of collagen for normal skin function (12 mg per day)
  • Broccoli seed extract (Sulforaphane) has been the subject of more than 800 published studies on its role on the antioxidant sphere.

When to take your Antioxidant?
We advise you to take your capsules at breakfast.

How to take your capsules?
It's very simple, you have to take your capsules with a big glass of water.

How many capsules do you take?
We recommend 2 capsules per day.

Storage conditions
Storage in the fridge: Stability test carried out on Sulfodyne® (stabilized sulforaphane extract) have shown that the optimal storage conditions are 4 to 8°C (see FAQ).

Precautions
People with hypothyroidism or thyroid treatment should seek medical advice before supplementation.
Pregnant or breastfeeding women should seek medical advice before suppleementation.

IngredientsFor 1 capsuleFor 2 capsules
Grape seed extract (GRAP’INSIDE®) (Vitis vinifera L.)180 mg360 mg
• of which OPC90 mg180 mg
• of which epicatechines / Monomers36 mg72 mg
Sulfodyne® (Brassica oleracea italica)60 mg120 mg
• of which broccoli extract9 mg18 mg
• of which stabilized sulforaphane2,5 mg5 mg
CavaQ1050 mg100 mg
• of which Q1010 mg20 mg
Vitamin C6 mg12 mg

Antioxidants and Aging
We hear about the benefits of antioxidants every day. But who are they exactly? And why are they so essential to our health?

Antioxidants are primarily preventive. They protect the body at the cellular level, primarily against free radical damage, which is released by cells during the normal functioning of our bodies.

So far, so good: A healthy, functioning body emits potentially harmful entities, but these are detected and neutralized by our cells. Cells are therefore our first line of defence, protecting and repairing our biological systems [4]. These defence mechanisms are extremely complex and involve many molecules, which are called Antioxidants because they fight against the oxidizing (destructive) power of free radicals. In particular, they are involved in a multitude of "redox" cycles (a cascade of oxidation-reduction reactions). Our body produces many Antioxidants directly, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase, coenzyme Q10...

Unfortunately, over time and due to external factors such as pollution, UV rays, diet... these harmful free radicals can become too numerous and overwhelm the antioxidant mechanisms of the cells. Especially since at the same time, our production of these antioxidant molecules declines, the redox cycles are disrupted, our defences become less efficient... This is precisely what we call "ageing". 1,2].

Nine brands have thus been proposed as the imprint of ageing. These can directly affect our genetic material, i.e. our DNA (genomic instability, reduction of the sites at the base of our chromosomes - the famous telomeres - epigenetic alterations), our protein balance (functional properties of proteins), our nutrient sensitivity mechanisms, our mitochondrial functions, our cell renewal and regeneration processes, and finally, our cellular communication mechanisms [3].

Focus on a mark of aging: the skin
During physiological aging, the appearance and structure of our skin are particularly affected (notably less collagen: appearance of wrinkles and loss of elasticity). Below the surface, at the cellular level, our skin also becomes more sensitive to environmental "aggressions" (UV rays, toxins, pollution...), and less effective in combating oxidative stress (emission of the famous free radicals). The visible signs of ageing are then likely to become more apparent and more numerous, and may even induce changes in composition, structure, elasticity and pigmentation [7,8]. This explains why the skin is a major site of antioxidant activity in the human body.

If the body no longer sufficiently manages free radicals to protect cells, and in order to limit the phenomena of ageing, it should therefore be supported by an external supply of dietary antioxidants or Nutraceuticals. This is particularly important for the skin [9,10].

But which Nutraceutical Antioxidants to choose ?
Until today the approach of "antioxidant" products has always been the same: to bring by oral vision a molecule that will "capture" free radicals. The idea being that as we age, we produce fewer free radical scavengers, so we can provide them directly. So you can imagine the shallot race, with the aim of finding the most powerful antioxidant, the one that will capture the maximum of free radicals. All of this, of course, measured by a laboratory test under totally artificial conditions (ORAC test and ORAC index). If this strategy seems intuitively interesting, it has two major flaws:

  1. The cause is not tackled but the consequences. Indeed, the decline in antioxidant production is a direct result of cellular aging, primarily at the genomic level. We do not take into account the complexity of the body's antioxidant mechanisms. Each of these antioxidants acts within a collective, in Redox cycles (a cascade of oxidation and reduction reactions). Bringing just one element among the many molecules involved is at best useless, at worst harmful (because it can disturb the balance of these Redox cycles).

And we don't even mention all these supposedly overpowering antioxidants whose stability or bioavailability leaves something to be desired (have you ever heard of Glutathione?). They sell you an antioxidant with an ORAC number that's going through the roof? Ask yourself a simple question: OK, it works great in the lab, on a probe, but what happens in the body is a whole different story, much more complex: so where is the clinical data?

By targeting the causes of ageing rather than the consequences, a new approach is possible. This approach allows the body to maintain its own defence systems and the balance of its antioxidant mechanisms. This requires molecules that act at the genomic level, protecting telomeres and gene expression (epigenetics).

And in order to design a truly effective antioxidant in capsules, it is also necessary to control these parameters:

  • Understanding the mechanism of action,
  • Guaranteed bioavailability and stability,
  • Effectiveness demonstrated by clinical studies.

So how did we do ?

Sulforaphane - the "star" antioxidant of the scientific community
While broccoli is not the most well-known antioxidant food, researchers have been studying the effects of a fascinating small molecule extracted from it for many years: Sulforaphane. The interest of the scientific community in the beneficial effects of Sulforaphane has increased particularly in the last 10 years. Its protective effect against the ageing process is now rather well established thanks to its powerful antioxidant role with nutrigenomic properties, thus getting to the root of the problem (action on gene expression) [15]. Sulforaphane is capable of - activating phase II enzymes responsible for the antioxidant response and metabolism of xenobiotics (toxic compounds such as reactive oxygen species): "detoxification pathway" and - inhibiting phase I enzymes, enzymes responsible for the activation of xenobiotics. It is also capable of inhibiting the processes involved in the pro-inflammatory response (NF-κB pathway). Finally, Sulforaphane may be able to inhibit epigenetic processes by which the expression of our genes is modified and to protect our protein system by protecting its activities and functions [16,17]. One of the latest publications on the scientific work carried out on Sulforaphane reports that its beneficial effects would be observable as early as 1.8 mg of pure Sulforaphane per day [18].

Clinical efficacy and mechanism of action are therefore validated. What about bioavailability ?

When consuming foods rich in Sulforaphane precursors (cruciferous plants, cabbage, broccoli) and after an enzymatic action of myrosinase, the precursor called glucoraphanin is hydrolyzed into Sulforaphane from the microbiota of the small intestine.

Today and after a necessary development period of more than 20 years (!), the Sulforaphane is still very unstable. !!), the direct use of Sulforaphane is finally possible and in optimal conditions guaranteeing its bioavailability AND stability, through the introduction of Sulfodyne® (from broccoli) in our Antioxidant. This unique and Made In France innovation has led to the filing of 2 patents. So for the first time a broccoli extract, standardized in Sulforaphane, ticks all the boxes of nutraceutical efficacy:

  • Mechanism of action ☑︎
  • Bioavailability ☑︎
  • Clinical efficacy ☑︎

To give you some benchmarks for comparison:

  • 2 capsules of our Antioxidant provide as much Sulforaphane as 190g of raw broccoli daily.
  • Numerous broccoli extracts are available and praise its antioxidant power. However, these extracts contain at best only precursors of Sulforaphane, with extremely low or even zero conversion depending on the person. If you are promised glucoraphanin - and count 25 mg of this precursor to have 1 mg of Sulforaphane in the best case ...

Polyphenols extracted from grape seeds
Grape extracts are naturally rich in polyphenols including anthocyanins, flavonols, stilbenes (including resveratrol) and phenolic acids. Different polyphenol profiles exist depending on the part of the grape used. The seeds contain the highest percentage of active polyphenols: flavonols and anthocyanins [19], giving these polyphenol-rich extracts a high antioxidant potential [20]. Although the mechanisms of action are difficult to elucidate, grape polyphenols could have a positive influence on telomere length and those present in the seeds could protect DNA integrity (fighting DNA damage) by effectively participating in the elimination of free radicals [21,22]. The structure of polyphenols should be considered for optimal efficacy. Indeed, 82% of flavonol monomers would be absorbed, against only 1% for polymers, ensuring better distribution to body tissues. Epicatechin (flavonol monomer), whose bioavailability is high, is notably present in significant quantities (≥ 20%) in the selected extract: GRAP'INSIDEâ. So you can understand why we have selected this particular extract.

  • Mechanism of action ☑︎
  • Bioavailability ☑︎
  • Clinical efficacy ☑︎

Coenzyme Q10 (Q10)
CoQ10, also known as ubiquinone or coenzyme Q10, is a central compound involved in mitochondrial electron transport and thus in energy production and membrane activity [23]. During the aging process, the biosynthesis of CoQ10 by the body decreases. The additional CoQ10 supply could therefore influence oxidative damage to the core molecules of our cells and functions: lipids, proteins and DNA [24,25]. The "ideal" doses of CoQ10 applicable for an "anti-aging" cure would be difficult to define, but studies report that as early as 100mg per day, the effects would be noticeable [24,26]. Moreover, these beneficial effects are often blocked by the difficulties of CoQ10 to reach the blood circulation when taken orally. This is why complexation with cyclodextrins allows CoQ10 to become soluble and therefore bioavailable [27,28]. Thanks to the CavaQ10 complex, a process of encapsulation of CoQ10 (ubiquinone, stable form) in cyclodextrins, bioavailability becomes 18 times higher than that of the compound alone. Considering that CavaQ10 contains 20% CoQ10 and that its bioavailability is 18 times higher, our Antioxidant therefore provides the equivalent of 360mg of CoQ10 for 2 capsules. Here again:

  • Mechanism of action☑︎
  • Bioavailability ☑︎
  • Clinical efficiency ☑︎

Publications

  1. Barouki, R. Stress oxydant et vieillissement. médecine/sciences 2006, 22, 266–272, doi:10.1051/medsci/2006223266.
  2. Bonnefont-Rousselot, D. Stress oxydant et vieillissement. 2007,
  3. López-Otín, C.; Blasco, M.A.; Partridge, L.; Serrano, M.; Kroemer, G. The Hallmarks of Aging. Cell 2013, 153, 1194–1217, doi:10.1016/j.cell.2013.05.039.
  4. Liguori, I.; Russo, G.; Curcio, F.; Bulli, G.; Aran, L.; Della-Morte, D.; Gargiulo, G.; Testa, G.; Cacciatore, F.; Bonaduce, D.; et al. Oxidative stress, aging, and diseases. Clin. Interv. Aging 2018, Volume 13, 757–772, doi:10.2147/CIA.S158513.
  5. Conti, V.; Izzo, V.; Corbi, G.; Russomanno, G.; Manzo, V.; De Lise, F.; Di Donato, A.; Filippelli, A. Antioxidant Supplementation in the Treatment of Aging-Associated Diseases. Front. Pharmacol. 2016, 7, doi:10.3389/fphar.2016.00024.
  6. Tan, B.L.; Norhaizan, M.E.; Liew, W.-P.-P.; Sulaiman Rahman, H. Antioxidant and Oxidative Stress: A Mutual Interplay in Age-Related Diseases. Front. Pharmacol. 2018, 9, 1162, doi:10.3389/fphar.2018.01162.
  7. Rinnerthaler, M.; Bischof, J.; Streubel, M.; Trost, A.; Richter, K. Oxidative Stress in Aging Human Skin. Biomolecules 2015, 5, 545–589, doi:10.3390/biom5020545.
  8. Dunaway, S.; Odin, R.; Zhou, L.; Ji, L.; Zhang, Y.; Kadekaro, A.L. Natural Antioxidants: Multiple Mechanisms to Protect Skin From Solar Radiation. Front. Pharmacol. 2018, 9, 392, doi:10.3389/fphar.2018.00392.
  9. Addor, F.A.S. Antioxidants in dermatology. An. Bras. Dermatol. 2017, 92, 356–362, doi:10.1590/abd1806-4841.20175697.
  10. Petruk, G.; Del Giudice, R.; Rigano, M.M.; Monti, D.M. Antioxidants from Plants Protect against Skin Photoaging. Oxid. Med. Cell. Longev. 2018, 11, doi:https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1454936.
  11. Guilland, J.-C. Les interactions entre les vitamines A, D, E et K : synergie et/ou compétition. Ol. Corps Gras Lipides 2011, 18, 59–67, doi:10.1051/ocl.2011.0376.
  12. Dutra, M.T.; Martins, W.R.; Ribeiro, A.L.A.; Bottaro, M. The Effects of Strength Training Combined with Vitamin C and E Supplementation on Skeletal Muscle Mass and Strength: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. J. Sports Med. 2020, 2020, 1–9, doi:10.1155/2020/3505209.
  13. Nikolaidis, M.G.; Kerksick, C.M.; Lamprecht, M.; McAnulty, S.R. Does Vitamin C and E Supplementation Impair the Favorable Adaptations of Regular Exercise? Oxid. Med. Cell. Longev. 2012, 2012, 1–11, doi:10.1155/2012/707941.
  14. Cory, H.; Passarelli, S.; Szeto, J.; Tamez, M.; Mattei, J. The Role of Polyphenols in Human Health and Food Systems: A Mini-Review. Front. Nutr. 2018, 5, 87, doi:10.3389/fnut.2018.00087.
  15. Houghton, C.A. Sulforaphane: Its “Coming of Age” as a Clinically Relevant Nutraceutical in the Prevention and Treatment of Chronic Disease. Oxid. Med. Cell. Longev. 2019, 2019, 1–27, doi:10.1155/2019/2716870.
  16. Juge, N.; Mithen, R.F.; Traka, M. Molecular basis for chemoprevention by sulforaphane: a comprehensive review. Cell. Mol. Life Sci. 2007, 64, 1105–1127, doi:10.1007/s00018-007-6484-5.
  17. Santín-Márquez, R.; Alarcón-Aguilar, A.; López-Diazguerrero, N.E.; Chondrogianni, N.; Königsberg, M. Sulforaphane - role in aging and neurodegeneration. GeroScience 2019, 41, 655–670, doi:10.1007/s11357-019-00061-7.
  18. Yagishita, Y.; Fahey, J.W.; Dinkova-Kostova, A.T.; Kensler, T.W. Broccoli or Sulforaphane: Is It the Source or Dose That Matters? Molecules 2019, 24, 3593, doi:10.3390/molecules24193593.
  19. Xia, E.-Q.; Deng, G.-F.; Guo, Y.-J.; Li, H.-B. Biological Activities of Polyphenols from Grapes. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2010, 11, 622–646, doi:10.3390/ijms11020622.
  20. Ma, Z.; Zhang, H. Phytochemical Constituents, Health Benefits, and Industrial Applications of Grape Seeds: A Mini-Review. Antioxidants 2017, 6, 71, doi:10.3390/antiox6030071.
  21. Yen, C.-Y.; Hou, M.-F.; Yang, Z.-W.; Tang, J.-Y.; Li, K.-T.; Huang, H.-W.; Huang, Y.-H.; Lee, S.-Y.; Fu, T.-F.; Hsieh, C.-Y.; et al. Concentration effects of grape seed extracts in anti-oral cancer cells involving differential apoptosis, oxidative stress, and DNA damage. BMC Complement. Altern. Med. 2015, 15, 94, doi:10.1186/s12906-015-0621-8.
  22. Vidaček, N.Š.; Nanić, L.; Ravlić, S.; Sopta, M.; Gerić, M.; Gajski, G.; Garaj-Vrhovac, V.; Rubelj, I. Telomeres, Nutrition, and Longevity: Can We Really Navigate Our Aging? J. Gerontol. Ser. A 2018, 73, 39–47, doi:10.1093/gerona/glx082.
  23. Hernández-Camacho, J.D.; Bernier, M.; López-Lluch, G.; Navas, P. Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation in Aging and Disease. Front. Physiol. 2018, 9, 44, doi:10.3389/fphys.2018.00044.
  24. Varela-López, A.; Giampieri, F.; Battino, M.; Quiles, J. Coenzyme Q and Its Role in the Dietary Therapy against Aging. Molecules 2016, 21, 373, doi:10.3390/molecules21030373.
  25. Barcelos, I.P. de; Haas, R.H. CoQ10 and Aging. Biology 2019, 8, 28, doi:10.3390/biology8020028.
  26. Casagrande, D.; Waib, P.H.; Jordão Júnior, A.A. Mechanisms of action and effects of the administration of Coenzyme Q10 on metabolic syndrome. J. Nutr. Intermed. Metab. 2018, 13, 26–32, doi:10.1016/j.jnim.2018.08.002.
  27. Terao, K.; Nakata, D.; Fukumi, H.; Schmid, G.; Arima, H.; Hirayama, F.; Uekama, K. Enhancement of oral bioavailability of coenzyme Q10 by complexation with γ-cyclodextrin in healthy adults. Nutr. Res. 2006, 26, 503–508, doi:10.1016/j.nutres.2006.08.004.
  28. Bank, G.; Kagan, D.; Madhavi, D. Coenzyme Q 10 : Clinical Update and Bioavailability. J. Evid.-Based Complement. Altern. Med. 2011, 16, 129–137, doi:10.1177/2156587211399438.

Where do our ingredients come from?

Origine des ingrédients de L'Antioxydant
Sulfodyne® - Triballat

Place of extraction: France, Rennes - Place of cultivation: Italy
A Breton SME, Triballat is the French pioneer of vegetable proteins. It has invested 20 years in research on Sulforaphane.

Grape seed extract GRAP’INSIDE® - Activ’Inside

Place of extraction: France, Bordeaux - Place of cultivation: France, Champagne Activ'Inside is the French specialist in active plant ingredients, particularly polyphenols.

CavaQ10® - Wacker

Place of fermentation: Japon - Microencapsulation: USA, Mineapolis Wacker is the specialist in the delivery of active ingredients by fermented cyclodextrins.

Capsule manufacturing - B-Pharma

France, Chambéry
B-Pharma is a recognized manufacturer of dry forms.

Sulfodyne® - Triballat

Place of extraction: France, Rennes - Place of cultivation: Italy
A Breton SME, Triballat is the French pioneer of vegetable proteins. It has invested 20 years in research on Sulforaphane.

Grape seed extract GRAP’INSIDE® - Activ’Inside

Place of extraction: France, Bordeaux - Place of cultivation: France, Champagne
Activ'Inside is the French specialist in active plant ingredients, particularly polyphenols.

CavaQ10® - Wacker

Place of fermantation: Japon - Microencapsulation: USA, Mineapolis
Wacker is the specialist in the delivery of active ingredients by fermented cyclodextrins.

Capsule manufacturing - B-Pharma

B-Pharma - France, Chambéry
B-Pharma is a recognized manufacturer of dry forms.

Associated products

Millet & Biotin
24,90€
Magnesium
19,90€
oragnic Spirulina
25,40€
the multi
22,90€

Questions - Answers

After how long does it take to see the first effects?

Cellular ageing is played out deep inside our cells, and it is a long, even very long term fight. However, the skin is a mecca for the antioxidant activity of the human body, and it is where the first "signs of aging" appear. Antioxidants can therefore be used to prevent periods of heavy sun exposure. It will thus help protect the skin against excessive production of free radicals and preserve its appearance.

Why are the raw materials not available in organic?

  • Broccoli: To date, the European Organic Agriculture sector is not very developed on broccoli, which does not allow the production of an ORGANIC extract. For ecological reasons, traceability, and quality of raw materials (seeds), the choice was made to work for the moment with the local sector (France and Italy) and therefore conventional. It should also be noted that Broccoli is one of the vegetables where the use of pesticides is among the lowest among the vegetables where the use of pesticides is among the lowest among the vegetables where the use of pesticides is among the lowest.
  • Grape seed extract : Today, the French industry mixes conventional and organic grape seeds. It is therefore not possible to offer an organic grape seed extract from Champagne. Once again, we have chosen the local to control the traceability and quality of our raw material.
  • CoQ10 : CoQ10 being produced by fermentation, it cannot by definition be labelled organic.

Why don't you use coenzyme Q10 as ubiquinol?

Ubiquinol is an alternative form of coenzyme Q10. It has an effect strictly identical to that of ubiquinone, but has a better bioavailability, i.e. you need to take less to have the same effect. This molecule is nevertheless very unstable, difficult to formulate in powder form and very expensive. And we have solved the bioavailability problem of ubiquinone by using the CAVAQ10® form, which is stable and 18 times more bioavailable than the "standard" CoQ10.

Why no glutathione in your formula?

The redox cycles for the protection of our cells are complex and involve many molecules including glutathione. By artificially providing just one of these molecules, we do not tackle the causes of the problem but its consequences, with the risk of a potential imbalance.

Our approach consists in acting directly upstream of these cycles, which are at the origin of the problem, to help the cells to naturally maintain the effectiveness of their defence mechanisms, among which we count the famous REDOX cycles.

Is our Antioxidant suitable for Vegan people?

Yes, it is suitable for vegan (vegan) people. The antioxidant is composed of 100% vegetable extracts and a Q10 ubiquinone from yeast.

Why should I keep my bottle in the refrigerator?

Stability tests undertaken on the stabilized broccoli extract (Sufodyne®) showed that the optimal storage conditions were at refrigerated temperatures of 4 to 8°C. As a guarantee of safety, the Antioxidant is dosed at 120% of the quantities that have demonstrated efficacy in clinical studies.

What if I eat broccoli and grapes?

Great idea! On the other hand, you will have to eat 190 g of broccoli to get as much sulforaphane as in 2 capsules of our Antioxidant. This broccoli must also be raw, because cooking strongly alters this precious molecule.

Are all broccoli extracts the same?

Like CoQ10 and grape extracts, there is a wide range of broccoli extracts. However, we are not aware of any broccoli extracts containing Sulforaphane other than Sulfodyne®.

In addition, you will find other broccoli extracts standardized in Sulforaphane Glucosinolate or Glucoraphanin. These are precursors that your body must convert in several steps to obtain Sulforaphane. It takes at best 25mg of these precursors to have only 1mg of Sulforaphane, and again, this is very dependent on the individuals, especially their microbiota.

Why is there a faint smell of sulfur when you open the bottle?

This smell is completely normal! In fact, you should even ask yourself questions if there is no smell. Indeed, sulforaphane contains a sulfur atom, including a thioisocyanate function. This function is the basis of its action, but also explains its sensitivity and characteristic smell. As is often the case, very little of this molecule is enough to generate a significant odour. It is an excellent reminder that the bottle should be kept in the fridge to preserve the sulforaphane as well as possible.

Reviews