Organic and Vegan Protein

Organic and Vegan Protein

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Proteins benefits

Today, many of us want to limit our consumption of animal proteins. If plant alternatives emerge, it remains difficult to integrate them into our daily lives.

Rather than yet another formula with a record protein content, our Vegetable and Organic Protein focuses on taste pleasure and nutritional balance, including a full aminogram and B12.

40 scoops - from 1/j

€24.90
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100% vegan
100% vegan
sans gluten
gluten free
sans additifs
without additives
sans gélatine
gelatin free
fabriqué en France
made in France

Want less meat? Vegetable proteins are a perfect alternative if they are well selected and combined.

Want less meat? Vegetable proteins are a perfect alternative if they are well selected and combined.

EFFICIENCY

One year of R&D for your palate

Helping you integrate vegetable proteins into your daily life cannot be done to the detriment of your palate. The incorporation of organic and patented soluble fibers (FiberGum® and Sunfiber®) makes it possible to obtain a creamy and homogeneous texture, against the insoluble mixtures of the first generation.
Beyond pea and rice proteins, our mix combines the first chia protein (Benexia®) and a pumpkin seed protein known for their flavors. Everything is subtly flavored with natural cocoa powder.

The protein content is good, but the nutritional balance is better!

Contrary to popular belief, it's not just the protein content that makes a good meat substitute. If our mix declares 60% of vegetable proteins, it offers above all an optimized aminogram including the 9 essential amino acids and thus displaying a chemical index * of 130. Beyond proteins, our vegetable mix is ​​a source of B12, a difficult essential nutrient to be found in a vegan diet.

Without forgetting the digestibility

Digestibility reflects the body's ability to assimilate the amino acids provided by a given protein. The more complete and well balanced an aminogram, the higher the digestibility of a protein. In the context of plant mixes, obtaining a complete aminogram requires the assembly of several sources of protein. We have therefore selected 4 complementary sources: peas, rice, chia and pumpkin seed.

A 100% natural formula

This mix is ​​free from any sweeteners and additives often used to flavor and thicken protein powders.

*Chemical index: it qualifies the quality of the aminogram (i.e. the amino acid profile) of a mix of proteins compared to a reference protein. A quality aminogram is a complete (including all essential amino acids) and balanced aminogram. A chemical index greater than 100 means that the protein has a complete and functional aminogram.

BENEFITS

When trying to reduce our consumption of animal proteins, it is not always easy to find complete substitutes that can easily be integrated into our daily lives. Vegetable and Organic Protein is a nutritional formula based on 60% of vegetable proteins intended to alleviate a lower consumption of proteins or an increased need in a more sustainable approach.

The proteins

  • Contribute to the increase and maintenance of muscle mass,
  • Help maintain normal bones.

Vitamin B12

  • Contributes to normal energy metabolism,
  • Helps reduce fatigue.

USAGE TIPS

When to take Vegetable and Organic Protein?

  • Breakfast.
  • Before a sports session (maintaining muscle mass) and / or after (increasing muscle mass).

How many pods?

  • Children: Not recommended.
  • Adolescents: Not recommended.
  • Adults and athletes: 1 to 2 doses per day depending on the physical activity performed.
  • Pregnant and lactating women: may be suitable for women with low protein intake.

Duration of a dose

  • Can be taken daily but must correspond to protein needs:
    - Make up for a diet low in protein.
    - Respond to a greater need depending on the level of physical activity (period of intense sport).

How to take its pods?

  • Powdered drink preparation, based on organic vegetable proteins.
  • Dilute 25 g (2 measuring spoons) of powder in 200 ml of water.
  • Shake until completely dissolved.
  • Do not hesitate to create your own recipes (you can cook it, it will reduce the intake of B12 but not of protein!).

Duration of a sachet

  • 20 days at the rate of 2 doses per day.

Precautions for use

  • Food supplement based on protein and vitamin B12, to be used in addition to a healthy and balanced diet.
  • Do not exceed the recommended daily doses.
  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women should seek medical advice before any supplementation.

Storage conditions

  • Store in its packaging in a dry place away from heat and light.
  • Keep out of the reach of children.

COMPOSITION

Nutritional values

Per 100 g (AR *)

  • Energy: 388 kcal (20%) / 1621 kJ (20%)
  • Fat: 8.2 g (12%)
    - of which saturated fatty acids: 2.8 g (15%)
    - of which polyunsaturated fatty acids: 3 g
  • Protein: 60 g (120%)
    - of which BCAA (1): 10.2 g
  • Carbohydrates: 25 g (10%)
    - of which Sugars: 12 g
    - of which Dietary fiber: 13 g
  • Salt (2): 1.5 g
  • Vitamin B12: 10 μg

* Reference intake for a typical adult: 8400 kJ / 2000 kcal
(1) Branched chain amino acids
(2) Content exclusively due to its natural presence

Ingredients: Vegetable protein mix * 76% (including: Pea protein isolate * 72.3%; Brown rice protein isolate * 14.6%; Pumpkin seed powder * 6.6%; Partially defatted seed powder chia (Benexia®) * 6.6%); Cane sugar*; Cocoa powder * 8%; Natural cocoa flavors; Partially hydrolyzed guar gum fibers *; Acacia gum fibers *; Preparation based on shiitake dosed with vitamin B12 *.

* Ingredients from organic farming (> 95%)

SCIENCE

In its article "The roots of sustainable food: when plant proteins come to the table", the INRAE ​​(National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and the Environment) brilliantly explains the challenges of sustainable access to proteins for a population of 7 billion human beings:

"... both for the preservation of the environment and for our health, a change in eating habits is necessary. We must adopt diets richer in fiber, less fat and less salty and which in particular rebalance the proportion of products from animal origin such as meat with proteins of vegetable origin, such as cereals or legumes "[1].

With growing global protein needs, how can we make plant protein accessible as a substitute for animal protein?

Protein: a crucial nutrient

Protein falls under the macronutrient category along with carbohydrates and fats. They therefore contribute to our caloric and energy intake. They are made up of a more or less long chain of structural units called amino acids. A large number of amino acids exist, but only 20 are used by the body to make two types of proteins essential for the body:

  • structural proteins: muscle tissue, integuments (nails, hair) and skin (actin, myosin, collagen, keratin),
  • proteins involved in physiological processes: enzymes and hormones in particular.

Among these 20 amino acids, 9 cannot be synthesized by our organism, and they are therefore called "essential": leucine, threonine, lysine, tryptophan, phenylalanine, valine, methionine, isoleucine and histidine. Some of these amino acids are particularly involved in muscle protein synthesis and are referred to as BCAAs (Branched Chain Amino Acids), which includes leucine, isoleucine and valine [2-4].

What protein need in humans?

The nutritional reference value for protein in healthy adults (RNP), established by ANSES, is 0.83 g per kilogram of body weight per day. For a 70 kg individual, this corresponds to a daily intake of 58 g. To get an idea of ​​what this represents, the table below shows some protein concentrations in common foods.
Overall this value must correspond to at least 10% of our energy intake [5]. These values ​​are of course likely to increase depending on the level of physical activity and especially sports [6].

Sources of protein and changing diets

While traditionally in the West "protein" rhymes with meat, fish and egg, today vegetable protein sources are shaking up our diet. The scientific interest in vegan proteins continues to grow with an explosion of publications about them, both nutritionally (health) and the environment.

The data provided by "Our world in data" (meat and dairy products production [7]) show an increase in consumption (kg / inhabitant / year) of meat at the world level between 1961 (start of the analysis) and 2013 (end of analysis). In France more specifically, this increase has nevertheless stabilized over the past ten years (end of analysis in 2017).

Could this observation reflect changes in eating behavior with respect to meat? The consumption of vegan proteins as a substitute for animal proteins can result from several reasons, ranging from ethical to health interest [8,9].

Regarding the ethical dimension, without fueling the veganism / veganism debate, we will mainly discuss the idea of ​​supporting this dietary transition by promoting the diversification of protein sources with plant alternatives to more reasoned and more sustainable agricultural methods.

The "new" diets favoring plants in developed countries

If in certain cultures essentially vegetable diets have always existed, for us Westerners, their appearance is a more modern practice. What are the main types of "plant" diets?

  • Flexitarian diets: quasi-vegetarian, they aim to make occasional consumption of meat and fish.
  • Vegetarian diets among which we distinguish:
    - Pesco-ovo-lacto-vegetarians: exclusion of meat
    - Ovo-lacto-vegetarians: exclusion of meat and fish,
    - Lacto-vegetarians: exclusion of meat, fish and eggs,
    - Exclusive vegetarians: exclusion of all animal products (very close to veganism).
  • Vegan diets: exclusion of all animal products and those requiring the intervention of animals. The term veganism (or "integral veganism") means the exclusion of all products of animal origin, including those outside the food field. However, the term vegan is very often used, due to its English-speaking origin, for veganism.

Proteins and environmental impact

Under their fashion, proteins of plant origin are gaining a much better environmental reputation than proteins of animal origin. Let's talk about greenhouse gas emissions, for example. In the food industry, these emissions depend on the practices observed throughout the production chain (preparation of agricultural land and farms, feed for livestock, production process, transport, methods of preserving the materials produced, packaging used). The data provided by "Our world in data" (environmental impact of food products [10]) indicate that plant-based products produce 10 to 50 times less kg of CO2 equivalents per kg of product. For example, pea production has a value of 0.9 compared to raising beef with a value of 60 kilograms of CO2 equivalents per kilogram. If we take a closer look at protein, 100 g of pea protein simply emits 0.4 kg of CO2 equivalents. This value is 90 times higher for 100 g of beef protein. In addition, there are other important parameters such as the notion of resource depletion linked to the challenge of feeding a growing world population. As the surface areas and the need for natural resources are less important for plants, their by-products are positioned as an asset for the food of our future.

Protein and health

The health aspect is particularly relevant to the nutritional compounds associated with the different protein sources. Meats, eggs and dairy products (especially cheese) contain types of fat (lipids) such as saturated fat and cholesterol that should not be consumed more than the recommended weekly servings. On the other hand, vegetable sources: legumes (soybeans, lentils, peas, etc.) and cereals (rye, rice, corn, etc.) contain good fiber and very little fat (and not “bad” ones). Published data on the subject suggest a positive correlation between diets containing vegetable protein sources (by replacement in diets rich in animal protein) and long-term health [11-13]. However, these observations must always be qualified because they must take into account the entire diet and all the associated nutrients.

Protein powder: allies of athletes

Being necessary for the formation (anabolism) of body muscle mass, proteins generally constitute a central element in the diet of athletes. The image of protein powders has long been associated with intense and / or rapid muscle-building activities. This consumption is also of interest to any type of athlete simply wishing to improve his performance. On the market, protein powders mainly consist of milk proteins: casein or whey (whey, whey). These are very well assimilated by the body and effectively increase the level of ingested proteins available for muscle anabolism.

To date, plant alternatives to protein powder of animal origin are developing, leading to questions, especially among athletes, about their equivalence or not with milk proteins and their real nutritional value. In addition, in addition to the desire to diversify our diet, opting for vegetable proteins can resolve the inconveniences sometimes observed with a high consumption of whey (milk proteins) such as digestive disorders due to the presence of lactose.

So-called "limiting" proteins and amino acids

Above, we mentioned these essential amino acids that our body cannot manufacture. We must therefore find them in our diet or supplementation for athletes. While protein of animal origin contains all the essential amino acids in sufficient quantities, this is not the case with vegetable proteins, which are less "complete" in certain essential amino acids. These amino acids in lower content are said to be “limiting”. For vegetable proteins, we observe that:

  • Legume proteins are deficient in so-called "sulfur" essential amino acids (methionine and cysteine),
  • Cereal proteins are deficient in lysine.

Two other concepts also make it possible to compare animal and vegetable proteins [14]:

  • The chemical index: which compares the composition and amino acid content of a given protein to that of a reference protein at the optimum composition.

    For example, to determine this chemical index for pea protein, it is necessary to calculate for each essential amino acid of this protein the following ratio: "amount of the amino acid" of the pea protein / "amount of the amino acid "in the reference protein

    This ratio can be:
    - Less than 100: this means that the amino acid in the protein of interest is in lower quantity compared to its content in the reference protein.
    - Greater than 100: this means that the amino acid in the protein of interest is in a greater quantity versus its content in the reference protein.

    Once the ratios of each amino acid have been calculated, the chemical index of the protein corresponds to the lowest amino acid ratio, which is referred to as "limiting amino acid". For pea protein, the limiting amino acid is methionine, and its chemical index is 90.

  • The PDCAAS ("Protein digestibility corrected amino acid score"): it corresponds to the chemical index multiplied by the digestibility index of the protein of interest (that of the pea in our example). It therefore goes a little further than the chemical index since it incorporates a notion of digestibility. The latter is obtained by a physiological measurement (fecal digestibility).

    This score is also based on a reference (such as the chemical index) and it is also indexed on an "ideal" score of 100. Note that the PDCAAS is valid for a specific food or protein, and not for mixtures. protein (unless fecal digestibility measurements are taken).

    PDCAAS can be:
    - Less than 100: which reflects poor digestibility compared to the reference protein.
    - Greater than 100: which indicates good digestibility comparable to that of the reference protein.

In conclusion, the chemical index is more of a way to characterize the profile of the protein, especially the amino acids it contains. PDCAAS is an index, with a physiological dimension, which takes into account the properties of the protein as food.

These two data highlight the main differences between animal and plant proteins:

  • Animal proteins generally have a higher chemical index than vegetable proteins, reflecting a naturally more balanced amino acid profile. Plant proteins generally have one or more limiting amino acids.
  • Their PDCAAS is also superior to that of vegetable proteins, reflecting their better digestibility.

Thus, it appears that a diet composed mainly of animal protein sources (meat, fish, eggs and cheese) incurs little risk of deficiency in essential amino acids, while most vegetable sources alone are not sufficient to cover the requirements for essential amino acids.

So how do you replace animal protein with vegetable protein without running the risk of running out of essential amino acids?

A mix that plays the card of complementarity with an optimized aminogram

Consuming plant protein in the same meal or a diet exclusively made up of plant proteins requires adopting a complementarity strategy. This requires the association on our plate of several complementary plant sources to bring together all the essential amino acids and ensure good digestibility and assimilation [15]. Our Vegetable and Organic Protein brings together 4 protein sources (peas, rice, pumpkin seeds and chia) having to offer an optimal protein which has a complete aminogram (chemical index at 130).

These calculations show that thanks to the use of 4 complementary protein sources, the generally limiting amino acids (at the lowest levels in the aminogram) in vegetable proteins (lysine, methionine and cysteine) are no longer in our Vegetable Protein. and Bio Nutri & Co (values ​​greater than 100 in the reference calculation 2).

Note that the important thing is not to have an always higher chemical index, but rather that it is greater than or equal to 100, thus reflecting the balance of the protein compared to the optimal reference.

A formula with a complete nutritional approach

Our Vegetable and Organic Protein has been designed to combine optimal nutritional balance and taste pleasure. With its 60% protein content and an optimal amino acid profile, our mix guarantees:

  • An intake of 2.6 g / serving of BCAA amino acids (leucine, isoleucine, valine).
  • An intake of 3.3 g / portion of dietary fiber. These natural fibers added to our mix of vegetable proteins allow a significant contribution of fibers which are sorely lacking in our diet (INCA III and NutriNet Santé studies) and which are not present in animal sources of protein. These fibers also allow the tasty texture of our mix.
  • An addition of vitamin B12 up to 100% of the recommended intakes: vitamin B12 is essential for cell reproduction and good health of the nervous system. It should be noted that vitamin B12 is mainly present in animal products [16].
  • Low in sugars: the recommendation on limiting added sugars in food is no secret when it comes to public health.

Each serving (25g) of our protein provides only 3g of sugar.

Finally, our powder mix is ​​both an organic and vegan protein and above all does not contain any sweetener.

The taste challenge

Proteins of plant origin are still little consumed and their taste may seem unusual, especially for lovers of milk / whey protein with “milkshake” type flavors flavored with chocolate or vanilla. In general, there are various types of vegetable protein powder on the market:

  • Those rich in certain vegetable proteins whose taste is too "characteristic" (bad balance, incomplete aminogram),
  • The bis-rich in certain vegetable proteins whose texture is too viscous or, on the contrary, too grainy (poor balance),
  • The very sweet ones by the presence of sweeteners (which try to find the taste of whey / casein powders),
  • Flavored them with chemical aromas.

Formulating a tastefully appreciable vegan protein based solely on vegetable proteins is therefore a real challenge. This is why, at Nutri & Co, we have opted for a composition from 4 specific sources. Although pea and rice proteins are conventionally used (for their protein complementarity; see section on limiting amino acids), the addition of pumpkin seed and chia seed proteins is absolutely new! These two proteins made it possible to obtain a good protein taste and a balanced texture. The presence of cocoa powder and natural cocoa aromas are part of this natural approach by preserving a low sugar level in the final formula, without however using sweeteners.

Publications

  1. INRAE Dossier de PRESSE : Les Racines d’une Alimentation Durable : Quand Les Protéines Végétales s’invitent à Table; 2020; p. 28.
  2. Wolfe, R.R. Branched-Chain Amino Acids and Muscle Protein Synthesis in Humans: Myth or Reality? J. Int. Soc. Sports Nutr. 2017, 14, 30, doi:10.1186/s12970-017-0184-9.
  3. Santos, C. de S.; Nascimento, F.E.L. Isolated Branched-Chain Amino Acid Intake and Muscle Protein Synthesis in Humans: A Biochemical Review. Einstein 2019, 17, 1–5, doi:10.31744/einstein_journal/2019RB4898.
  4. Morse, T.; Willoughby, D.S. Efficacy of BCAA Supplementation for Exercise Performance and Recovery: A Narrative Review. J Nutr Health Food Eng 2019, 9, 128–133, doi:10.15406/jnhfe.2019.09.00337.
  5. ANSES Actualisation Des Repères Du PNNS : Élaboration Des Références Nutritionnelles; 2016; p. 196.
  6. CERIN Besoin En Protéines Des Sportifs (Aspects Quantitatif et Qualitatif) Available online: https://www.cerin.org/actualites/besoin-en-proteines-des-sportifs-aspects-quantitatif-et-qualitatif/.
  7. Ritchie, H.; Roser, M. Our World in Data : Meat and Dairy Production; 2019.
  8. Mariotti, F. Vegetarian and Plant-Based Diets in Health and Disease Prevention; Elsevier, 2017; ISBN 978-0-12-803968-7.
  9. Medawar, E.; Huhn, S.; Villringer, A.; Veronica Witte, A. The Effects of Plant-Based Diets on the Body and the Brain: A Systematic Review. Transl. Psychiatry 2019, 9, 226, doi:10.1038/s41398-019-0552-0.
  10. Ritchie, H.; Roser, M. Our World in Data : Environmental Impacts of Food Production; 2020.
  11. Richter, C.K.; Skulas-Ray, A.C.; Champagne, C.M.; Kris-Etherton, P.M. Plant Protein and Animal Proteins: Do They Differentially Affect Cardiovascular Disease Risk? Adv. Nutr. 2015, 6, 712–728, doi:10.3945/an.115.009654.
  12. Chalvon-Demersay, T.; Azzout-Marniche, D.; Arfsten, J.; Egli, L.; Gaudichon, C.; Karagounis, L.G.; Tomé, D. A Systematic Review of the Effects of Plant Compared with Animal Protein Sources on Features of Metabolic Syndrome. J. Nutr. 2017, jn239574, doi:10.3945/jn.116.239574.
  13. Clark, M.A.; Springmann, M.; Hill, J.; Tilman, D. Multiple Health and Environmental Impacts of Foods. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 2019, 116, 23357–23362, doi:10.1073/pnas.1906908116.
  14. AFSSA Apport en protéines : consommation, qualité, besoins et recommandations; 2007; p. 461;.
  15. Berrazaga, I.; Micard, V.; Gueugneau, M.; Walrand, S. The Role of the Anabolic Properties of Plant- versus Animal-Based Protein Sources in Supporting Muscle Mass Maintenance: A Critical Review. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1825, doi:10.3390/nu11081825.
  16. Obeid, R.; Heil, S.G.; Verhoeven, M.M.A.; van den Heuvel, E.G.H.M.; de Groot, L.C.P.G.M.; Eussen, S.J.P.M. Vitamin B12 Intake From Animal Foods, Biomarkers, and Health Aspects. Front. Nutr. 2019, 6, 93, doi:10.3389/fnut.2019.00093.
EFFICACITÉ
BENEFITS
USAGE TIPS
COMPOSITION
SCIENCE

One year of R&D for your palate
Helping you integrate vegetable proteins into your daily life cannot be done to the detriment of your palate. The incorporation of organic and patented soluble fibers (FiberGum® and Sunfiber®) makes it possible to obtain a creamy and homogeneous texture, against the insoluble mixtures of the first generation.
Beyond pea and rice proteins, our mix combines the first chia protein (Benexia®) and a pumpkin seed protein known for their flavors. Everything is subtly flavored with natural cocoa powder.

The protein content is good, but the nutritional balance is better!
Contrary to popular belief, it's not just the protein content that makes a good meat substitute. If our mix declares 60% of vegetable proteins, it offers above all an optimized aminogram including the 9 essential amino acids and thus displaying a chemical index * of 130. Beyond proteins, our vegetable mix is ​​a source of B12, a difficult essential nutrient to be found in a vegan diet.

Without forgetting the digestibility
Digestibility reflects the body's ability to assimilate the amino acids provided by a given protein. The more complete and well balanced an aminogram, the higher the digestibility of a protein. In the context of plant mixes, obtaining a complete aminogram requires the assembly of several sources of protein. We have therefore selected 4 complementary sources: peas, rice, chia and pumpkin seed.

A 100% natural formula
This mix is ​​free from any sweeteners and additives often used to flavor and thicken protein powders.

*Chemical index: it qualifies the quality of the aminogram (i.e. the amino acid profile) of a mix of proteins compared to a reference protein. A quality aminogram is a complete (including all essential amino acids) and balanced aminogram. A chemical index greater than 100 means that the protein has a complete and functional aminogram.

When trying to reduce our consumption of animal proteins, it is not always easy to find complete substitutes that can easily be integrated into our daily lives. Vegetable and Organic Protein is a nutritional formula based on 60% of vegetable proteins intended to alleviate a lower consumption of proteins or an increased need in a more sustainable approach.

The proteins

  • Contribute to the increase and maintenance of muscle mass,
  • Help maintain normal bones.

Vitamin B12

  • Contributes to normal energy metabolism,
  • Helps reduce fatigue.

When to take Vegetable and Organic Protein?

  • Breakfast.
  • Before a sports session (maintaining muscle mass) and / or after (increasing muscle mass).

How many pods?

  • Children: Not recommended.
  • Adolescents: Not recommended.
  • Adults and athletes: 1 to 2 doses per day depending on the physical activity performed.
  • Pregnant and lactating women: may be suitable for women with low protein intake.

Duration of a dose

  • Can be taken daily but must correspond to protein needs:
    - Make up for a diet low in protein.
    - Respond to a greater need depending on the level of physical activity (period of intense sport).

How to take its pods?

  • Powdered drink preparation, based on organic vegetable proteins.
  • Dilute 25 g (2 measuring spoons) of powder in 200 ml of water.
  • Shake until completely dissolved.
  • Do not hesitate to create your own recipes (you can cook it, it will reduce the intake of B12 but not of protein!).

Duration of a sachet

  • 20 days at the rate of 2 doses per day.

Precautions for use

  • Food supplement based on protein and vitamin B12, to be used in addition to a healthy and balanced diet.
  • Do not exceed the recommended daily doses.
  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women should seek medical advice before any supplementation.

Storage conditions

  • Store in its packaging in a dry place away from heat and light.
  • Keep out of the reach of children.

Nutritional values

Per 100 g (AR *)

  • Energy: 388 kcal (20%) / 1621 kJ (20%)
  • Fat: 8.2 g (12%)
    - of which saturated fatty acids: 2.8 g (15%)
    - of which polyunsaturated fatty acids: 3 g
  • Protein: 60 g (120%)
    - of which BCAA (1): 10.2 g
  • Carbohydrates: 25 g (10%)
    - of which Sugars: 12 g
    - of which Dietary fiber: 13 g
  • Salt (2): 1.5 g
  • Vitamin B12: 10 μg

* Reference intake for a typical adult: 8400 kJ / 2000 kcal
(1) Branched chain amino acids
(2) Content exclusively due to its natural presence

Ingredients: Vegetable protein mix * 76% (including: Pea protein isolate * 72.3%; Brown rice protein isolate * 14.6%; Pumpkin seed powder * 6.6%; Partially defatted seed powder chia (Benexia®) * 6.6%); Cane sugar*; Cocoa powder * 8%; Natural cocoa flavors; Partially hydrolyzed guar gum fibers *; Acacia gum fibers *; Preparation based on shiitake dosed with vitamin B12 *.

* Ingredients from organic farming (> 95%)

In its article "The roots of sustainable food: when plant proteins come to the table", the INRAE ​​(National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and the Environment) brilliantly explains the challenges of sustainable access to proteins for a population of 7 billion human beings:

"... both for the preservation of the environment and for our health, a change in eating habits is necessary. We must adopt diets richer in fiber, less fat and less salty and which in particular rebalance the proportion of products from animal origin such as meat with proteins of vegetable origin, such as cereals or legumes "[1].

With growing global protein needs, how can we make plant protein accessible as a substitute for animal protein?

Protein: a crucial nutrient

Protein falls under the macronutrient category along with carbohydrates and fats. They therefore contribute to our caloric and energy intake. They are made up of a more or less long chain of structural units called amino acids. A large number of amino acids exist, but only 20 are used by the body to make two types of proteins essential for the body:

  • structural proteins: muscle tissue, integuments (nails, hair) and skin (actin, myosin, collagen, keratin),
  • proteins involved in physiological processes: enzymes and hormones in particular.

Among these 20 amino acids, 9 cannot be synthesized by our organism, and they are therefore called "essential": leucine, threonine, lysine, tryptophan, phenylalanine, valine, methionine, isoleucine and histidine. Some of these amino acids are particularly involved in muscle protein synthesis and are referred to as BCAAs (Branched Chain Amino Acids), which includes leucine, isoleucine and valine [2-4].

What protein need in humans?

The nutritional reference value for protein in healthy adults (RNP), established by ANSES, is 0.83 g per kilogram of body weight per day. For a 70 kg individual, this corresponds to a daily intake of 58 g. To get an idea of ​​what this represents, the table below shows some protein concentrations in common foods.
Overall this value must correspond to at least 10% of our energy intake [5]. These values ​​are of course likely to increase depending on the level of physical activity and especially sports [6].

Sources of protein and changing diets

While traditionally in the West "protein" rhymes with meat, fish and egg, today vegetable protein sources are shaking up our diet. The scientific interest in vegan proteins continues to grow with an explosion of publications about them, both nutritionally (health) and the environment.

The data provided by "Our world in data" (meat and dairy products production [7]) show an increase in consumption (kg / inhabitant / year) of meat at the world level between 1961 (start of the analysis) and 2013 (end of analysis). In France more specifically, this increase has nevertheless stabilized over the past ten years (end of analysis in 2017).

Could this observation reflect changes in eating behavior with respect to meat? The consumption of vegan proteins as a substitute for animal proteins can result from several reasons, ranging from ethical to health interest [8,9].

Regarding the ethical dimension, without fueling the veganism / veganism debate, we will mainly discuss the idea of ​​supporting this dietary transition by promoting the diversification of protein sources with plant alternatives to more reasoned and more sustainable agricultural methods.

The "new" diets favoring plants in developed countries

If in certain cultures essentially vegetable diets have always existed, for us Westerners, their appearance is a more modern practice. What are the main types of "plant" diets?

  • Flexitarian diets: quasi-vegetarian, they aim to make occasional consumption of meat and fish.
  • Vegetarian diets among which we distinguish:
    - Pesco-ovo-lacto-vegetarians: exclusion of meat
    - Ovo-lacto-vegetarians: exclusion of meat and fish,
    - Lacto-vegetarians: exclusion of meat, fish and eggs,
    - Exclusive vegetarians: exclusion of all animal products (very close to veganism).
  • Vegan diets: exclusion of all animal products and those requiring the intervention of animals. The term veganism (or "integral veganism") means the exclusion of all products of animal origin, including those outside the food field. However, the term vegan is very often used, due to its English-speaking origin, for veganism.

Proteins and environmental impact

Under their fashion, proteins of plant origin are gaining a much better environmental reputation than proteins of animal origin. Let's talk about greenhouse gas emissions, for example. In the food industry, these emissions depend on the practices observed throughout the production chain (preparation of agricultural land and farms, feed for livestock, production process, transport, methods of preserving the materials produced, packaging used). The data provided by "Our world in data" (environmental impact of food products [10]) indicate that plant-based products produce 10 to 50 times less kg of CO2 equivalents per kg of product. For example, pea production has a value of 0.9 compared to raising beef with a value of 60 kilograms of CO2 equivalents per kilogram. If we take a closer look at protein, 100 g of pea protein simply emits 0.4 kg of CO2 equivalents. This value is 90 times higher for 100 g of beef protein. In addition, there are other important parameters such as the notion of resource depletion linked to the challenge of feeding a growing world population. As the surface areas and the need for natural resources are less important for plants, their by-products are positioned as an asset for the food of our future.

Protein and health

The health aspect is particularly relevant to the nutritional compounds associated with the different protein sources. Meats, eggs and dairy products (especially cheese) contain types of fat (lipids) such as saturated fat and cholesterol that should not be consumed more than the recommended weekly servings. On the other hand, vegetable sources: legumes (soybeans, lentils, peas, etc.) and cereals (rye, rice, corn, etc.) contain good fiber and very little fat (and not “bad” ones). Published data on the subject suggest a positive correlation between diets containing vegetable protein sources (by replacement in diets rich in animal protein) and long-term health [11-13]. However, these observations must always be qualified because they must take into account the entire diet and all the associated nutrients.

Protein powder: allies of athletes

Being necessary for the formation (anabolism) of body muscle mass, proteins generally constitute a central element in the diet of athletes. The image of protein powders has long been associated with intense and / or rapid muscle-building activities. This consumption is also of interest to any type of athlete simply wishing to improve his performance. On the market, protein powders mainly consist of milk proteins: casein or whey (whey, whey). These are very well assimilated by the body and effectively increase the level of ingested proteins available for muscle anabolism.

To date, plant alternatives to protein powder of animal origin are developing, leading to questions, especially among athletes, about their equivalence or not with milk proteins and their real nutritional value. In addition, in addition to the desire to diversify our diet, opting for vegetable proteins can resolve the inconveniences sometimes observed with a high consumption of whey (milk proteins) such as digestive disorders due to the presence of lactose.

So-called "limiting" proteins and amino acids

Above, we mentioned these essential amino acids that our body cannot manufacture. We must therefore find them in our diet or supplementation for athletes. While protein of animal origin contains all the essential amino acids in sufficient quantities, this is not the case with vegetable proteins, which are less "complete" in certain essential amino acids. These amino acids in lower content are said to be “limiting”. For vegetable proteins, we observe that:

  • Legume proteins are deficient in so-called "sulfur" essential amino acids (methionine and cysteine),
  • Cereal proteins are deficient in lysine.

Two other concepts also make it possible to compare animal and vegetable proteins [14]:

  • The chemical index: which compares the composition and amino acid content of a given protein to that of a reference protein at the optimum composition.

    For example, to determine this chemical index for pea protein, it is necessary to calculate for each essential amino acid of this protein the following ratio: "amount of the amino acid" of the pea protein / "amount of the amino acid "in the reference protein

    This ratio can be:
    - Less than 100: this means that the amino acid in the protein of interest is in lower quantity compared to its content in the reference protein.
    - Greater than 100: this means that the amino acid in the protein of interest is in a greater quantity versus its content in the reference protein.

    Once the ratios of each amino acid have been calculated, the chemical index of the protein corresponds to the lowest amino acid ratio, which is referred to as "limiting amino acid". For pea protein, the limiting amino acid is methionine, and its chemical index is 90.

  • The PDCAAS ("Protein digestibility corrected amino acid score"): it corresponds to the chemical index multiplied by the digestibility index of the protein of interest (that of the pea in our example). It therefore goes a little further than the chemical index since it incorporates a notion of digestibility. The latter is obtained by a physiological measurement (fecal digestibility).

    This score is also based on a reference (such as the chemical index) and it is also indexed on an "ideal" score of 100. Note that the PDCAAS is valid for a specific food or protein, and not for mixtures. protein (unless fecal digestibility measurements are taken).

    PDCAAS can be:
    - Less than 100: which reflects poor digestibility compared to the reference protein.
    - Greater than 100: which indicates good digestibility comparable to that of the reference protein.

In conclusion, the chemical index is more of a way to characterize the profile of the protein, especially the amino acids it contains. PDCAAS is an index, with a physiological dimension, which takes into account the properties of the protein as food.

These two data highlight the main differences between animal and plant proteins:

  • Animal proteins generally have a higher chemical index than vegetable proteins, reflecting a naturally more balanced amino acid profile. Plant proteins generally have one or more limiting amino acids.
  • Their PDCAAS is also superior to that of vegetable proteins, reflecting their better digestibility.

Thus, it appears that a diet composed mainly of animal protein sources (meat, fish, eggs and cheese) incurs little risk of deficiency in essential amino acids, while most vegetable sources alone are not sufficient to cover the requirements for essential amino acids.

So how do you replace animal protein with vegetable protein without running the risk of running out of essential amino acids?

A mix that plays the card of complementarity with an optimized aminogram

Consuming plant protein in the same meal or a diet exclusively made up of plant proteins requires adopting a complementarity strategy. This requires the association on our plate of several complementary plant sources to bring together all the essential amino acids and ensure good digestibility and assimilation [15]. Our Vegetable and Organic Protein brings together 4 protein sources (peas, rice, pumpkin seeds and chia) having to offer an optimal protein which has a complete aminogram (chemical index at 130).

These calculations show that thanks to the use of 4 complementary protein sources, the generally limiting amino acids (at the lowest levels in the aminogram) in vegetable proteins (lysine, methionine and cysteine) are no longer in our Vegetable Protein. and Bio Nutri & Co (values ​​greater than 100 in the reference calculation 2).

Note that the important thing is not to have an always higher chemical index, but rather that it is greater than or equal to 100, thus reflecting the balance of the protein compared to the optimal reference.

A formula with a complete nutritional approach

Our Vegetable and Organic Protein has been designed to combine optimal nutritional balance and taste pleasure. With its 60% protein content and an optimal amino acid profile, our mix guarantees:

  • An intake of 2.6 g / serving of BCAA amino acids (leucine, isoleucine, valine).
  • An intake of 3.3 g / portion of dietary fiber. These natural fibers added to our mix of vegetable proteins allow a significant contribution of fibers which are sorely lacking in our diet (INCA III and NutriNet Santé studies) and which are not present in animal sources of protein. These fibers also allow the tasty texture of our mix.
  • An addition of vitamin B12 up to 100% of the recommended intakes: vitamin B12 is essential for cell reproduction and good health of the nervous system. It should be noted that vitamin B12 is mainly present in animal products [16].
  • Low in sugars: the recommendation on limiting added sugars in food is no secret when it comes to public health.

Each serving (25g) of our protein provides only 3g of sugar.

Finally, our powder mix is ​​both an organic and vegan protein and above all does not contain any sweetener.

The taste challenge

Proteins of plant origin are still little consumed and their taste may seem unusual, especially for lovers of milk / whey protein with “milkshake” type flavors flavored with chocolate or vanilla. In general, there are various types of vegetable protein powder on the market:

  • Those rich in certain vegetable proteins whose taste is too "characteristic" (bad balance, incomplete aminogram),
  • The bis-rich in certain vegetable proteins whose texture is too viscous or, on the contrary, too grainy (poor balance),
  • The very sweet ones by the presence of sweeteners (which try to find the taste of whey / casein powders),
  • Flavored them with chemical aromas.

Formulating a tastefully appreciable vegan protein based solely on vegetable proteins is therefore a real challenge. This is why, at Nutri & Co, we have opted for a composition from 4 specific sources. Although pea and rice proteins are conventionally used (for their protein complementarity; see section on limiting amino acids), the addition of pumpkin seed and chia seed proteins is absolutely new! These two proteins made it possible to obtain a good protein taste and a balanced texture. The presence of cocoa powder and natural cocoa aromas are part of this natural approach by preserving a low sugar level in the final formula, without however using sweeteners.

Publications

  1. INRAE Dossier de PRESSE : Les Racines d’une Alimentation Durable : Quand Les Protéines Végétales s’invitent à Table; 2020; p. 28.
  2. Wolfe, R.R. Branched-Chain Amino Acids and Muscle Protein Synthesis in Humans: Myth or Reality? J. Int. Soc. Sports Nutr. 2017, 14, 30, doi:10.1186/s12970-017-0184-9.
  3. Santos, C. de S.; Nascimento, F.E.L. Isolated Branched-Chain Amino Acid Intake and Muscle Protein Synthesis in Humans: A Biochemical Review. Einstein 2019, 17, 1–5, doi:10.31744/einstein_journal/2019RB4898.
  4. Morse, T.; Willoughby, D.S. Efficacy of BCAA Supplementation for Exercise Performance and Recovery: A Narrative Review. J Nutr Health Food Eng 2019, 9, 128–133, doi:10.15406/jnhfe.2019.09.00337.
  5. ANSES Actualisation Des Repères Du PNNS : Élaboration Des Références Nutritionnelles; 2016; p. 196.
  6. CERIN Besoin En Protéines Des Sportifs (Aspects Quantitatif et Qualitatif) Available online: https://www.cerin.org/actualites/besoin-en-proteines-des-sportifs-aspects-quantitatif-et-qualitatif/.
  7. Ritchie, H.; Roser, M. Our World in Data : Meat and Dairy Production; 2019.
  8. Mariotti, F. Vegetarian and Plant-Based Diets in Health and Disease Prevention; Elsevier, 2017; ISBN 978-0-12-803968-7.
  9. Medawar, E.; Huhn, S.; Villringer, A.; Veronica Witte, A. The Effects of Plant-Based Diets on the Body and the Brain: A Systematic Review. Transl. Psychiatry 2019, 9, 226, doi:10.1038/s41398-019-0552-0.
  10. Ritchie, H.; Roser, M. Our World in Data : Environmental Impacts of Food Production; 2020.
  11. Richter, C.K.; Skulas-Ray, A.C.; Champagne, C.M.; Kris-Etherton, P.M. Plant Protein and Animal Proteins: Do They Differentially Affect Cardiovascular Disease Risk? Adv. Nutr. 2015, 6, 712–728, doi:10.3945/an.115.009654.
  12. Chalvon-Demersay, T.; Azzout-Marniche, D.; Arfsten, J.; Egli, L.; Gaudichon, C.; Karagounis, L.G.; Tomé, D. A Systematic Review of the Effects of Plant Compared with Animal Protein Sources on Features of Metabolic Syndrome. J. Nutr. 2017, jn239574, doi:10.3945/jn.116.239574.
  13. Clark, M.A.; Springmann, M.; Hill, J.; Tilman, D. Multiple Health and Environmental Impacts of Foods. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 2019, 116, 23357–23362, doi:10.1073/pnas.1906908116.
  14. AFSSA Apport en protéines : consommation, qualité, besoins et recommandations; 2007; p. 461;.
  15. Berrazaga, I.; Micard, V.; Gueugneau, M.; Walrand, S. The Role of the Anabolic Properties of Plant- versus Animal-Based Protein Sources in Supporting Muscle Mass Maintenance: A Critical Review. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1825, doi:10.3390/nu11081825.
  16. Obeid, R.; Heil, S.G.; Verhoeven, M.M.A.; van den Heuvel, E.G.H.M.; de Groot, L.C.P.G.M.; Eussen, S.J.P.M. Vitamin B12 Intake From Animal Foods, Biomarkers, and Health Aspects. Front. Nutr. 2019, 6, 93, doi:10.3389/fnut.2019.00093.

Where do our ingredients come from?

Origine des ingrédients de la Mélatonine
Development and production of Organic Vegetable Protein - JLB Dév.

Manufacturing: Brignais, France
For more than 15 years, JLB Développement has positioned itself as an expert group in the innovation and manufacture of products intended for sports nutrition and well-being.

Pea protein - PEVESA

Origin of peas: Canada, US, India and EU. Manufacturing: Madrid, Spain.
PEVESA is one of the world leaders in the production of vegetable proteins. Its pea protein is made from peas of Canada, US, India and European Union origin.

Chia protein - Benexia®

Origin of chia: Chile. Manufacturing: Chile.
Benexia® has developed a patented extraction process, which allows chia protein to retain the integrity of its nutritional potential. This chia protein is the only one authorized for sale in the European Union.

Rice Protein - Jiangxi Hengding Food (via Nutraceuticals)
Origin of rice: Jiangxi, China. Manufacture: Jiangxi, China.
Asia is the largest producer of rice, it seemed obvious to select a well-defined and targeted material, produced by the world market leader.
Pumpkin Seed Protein - Schalk Meuhle (via Seah Int.)

Origin of pumpkin seeds: Austria. Manufacturing: Vienna, Austria.
Schalk Muehle is an Austrian producer of vegetable proteins. It is part of an eco-responsible approach that translates into fair agricultural practices and a goal of neutrality in terms of greenhouse gas emissions.

Guar fibers - Taiyo (via Vivatis Pharma)

Origin of guar gum: India. Manufacturing: Rajasthan, India.
The partially hydrolyzed guar gum fibers are a Taiyo exclusive and come from Indian family farms. Patented (Sunfiber®), they benefit from organic and ISO 19657 certification ("natural ingredient").

Acacia fibers - Nexira

Origin of acacia gum: Chad and Sudan. Manufacturing: Rouen, France.
Nexira est une entreprise familiale qui produit une fibre d’acacia issue d’une filière durable et BIO, préservant les ressources naturelles, soutenant les communautés locales et visant une empreinte carbone neutre.

Cocoa powder - Barry Callebaut

Origin of cocoa: Rep. Dominican, Peru and Tanzania. Manufacturing: Zurich, Switzerland.
Today, cocoa farming is tightly controlled by European regulations which impose full traceability and prohibit certain origins. Barry Callebaut follows a “fair” pricing approach offered to producers.

Natural cocoa flavors - Robertet and Silesia

Manufacturing: Grasse, France and Düsseldorf, Germany
Robertet and Silesia are two European leaders in natural flavors made in France and Germany respectively.

Preparation of shiitake rich in B12 - Rosun (via Seah international)

Origin of shiitake: India. Manufacturing: Tamil Nadu, India.
Rosun is a pioneer in extracting natural vitamins from organically grown plants.

Développement et production de Protéine Végétale et Bio - JLB Développement

Fabrication : Brignais, France
Depuis plus de 15 ans, JLB Développement se positionne comme un groupe expert dans l’innovation et la fabrication de produits destinés à la nutrition sportive et au bien-être.

Protéine de pois - PEVESA

Origine des pois : Canada, US, Inde et Union Européenne - Fabrication : Madrid, Espagne
PEVESA est un des leaders mondiaux de la production de protéines végétales. Sa protéine de pois est élaborée à partir de pois d’origine Canada, US, Inde et Union Européenne.

Protéine de chia - Benexia®

Origine du chia :  Chili - Fabrication : Benexia® , Chili
Benexia® a développé un procédé d’extraction breveté, qui permet à la protéine de chia de conserver l’intégrité de son potentiel nutritif. Cette protéine de chia est la seule autorisée à la vente en Union Européenne.

Protéine de riz  - Jiangxi Hengding Food (via Nutraceuticals)

Origine du riz : Chine, Jiangxi - Fabrication :  Jiangxi Hengding, Jiangxi, Chine
L’Asie est le plus gros producteur de riz, il paraissait évident d’aller sélectionner une matière bien tracée et ciblée, produite par le leader mondial du marché.

Protéine de graines de courge - Schalk Muehle (via Seah international)

Origine des graines de courge : Autriche - Fabrication : Schalk Muehle, Vienne, Autriche
Schalk Muehle est un producteur autrichien de protéines végétales. Il s'inscrit dans une démarche éco-responsable qui se traduit par des pratiques agricoles équitables et un objectif de neutralité en termes d'émissions de gaz à effet de serre.

Fibres de guar - Taiyo (via Vivatis Pharma)

Origine de la gomme de guar : Inde - Fabrication : Taiyo, Rajasthan, Inde
Les fibres partiellement hydrolysées de gomme de guar sont une exclusivité Taiyo et proviennent de fermes familiales indiennes. Brevetées (Sunfiber®), elles bénéficient de la certification BIO et ISO 19657 ("ingrédient naturel").

Fibres d'acacia - Nexira

Origine de la gomme d’acacia : Tchad et Soudan - Fabrication : Nexira, Rouen, France
Nexira est une entreprise familiale qui produit une fibre d’acacia issue d’une filière durable et BIO, préservant les ressources naturelles, soutenant les communautés locales et visant une empreinte carbone neutre.

Poudre de cacao - Barry Callebaut

Origine du cacao : Rép. Dominicaine, Pérou et Tanzanie - Fabrication : Barry Callebaut, Zurich, Suisse
L’exploitation de cacao est aujourd’hui très encadrée par la réglementation européenne qui impose une traçabilité complète et interdit certaines origines. Barry Callebaut s’inscrit dans une démarche de prix "juste" proposé aux producteurs.

Arômes naturels de cacao - Robertet, Silesia

Fabrication : Grasse, France et Düsseldorf, Allemagne
Robertet et Silesia sont deux leaders européens dans les arômes naturels fabriqués en France et en Allemagne respectivement.

Préparation de shiitaké riche en B12 - Rosun (via Seah international)

Origine du shiitaké : Inde - Fabrication : Rosun, Tamil Nadu, Inde
Rosun est un pionnier dans l'extraction de vitamines naturelles à partir de plantes issues de l'agriculture biologique.

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Questions - Answers

How many serving (s) should I take per day?

Notre Protéine Végétale et Bio doit s’adapter à votre alimentation et à votre niveau d’activité physique. Nous conseillons une à plusieurs doses par jour selon l’activité physique réalisée (une portion = 2 scoops). Hors activité physique intense, nous conseillons de ne pas consommer un nombre de portions dépassant le besoin de base en protéines, soit 2 portions par jour. Vous pouvez vous référer au tableau présent dans l’onglet conseils d’utilisation pour des estimations précises ou prendre contact avec nos équipes.

Is your Vegetable and Organic Protein suitable if I carry out an intense sporting activity?

Oui. Son aminogramme optimisé permet de garantir un équilibre en acides aminés essentiels (10%, soit 2,6g de BCAA par portion), une bonne digestibilité et de répondre à la sollicitation musculaire importante tel que dans un sport de force.

Can I take it if I don't play sports?

Tout à fait, notamment si vous êtes dans une démarche de réduire votre consommation de protéines animales. N’hésitez pas à consulter nos équipes, à vous référer à l’onglet conseils d’utilisation et à demander notre livre de recettes dédié !

How to consume it?

Notre Protéine Végétale Bio est une préparation pour boisson en poudre à base de différentes protéines végétales bio. Diluer 25 g (une portion = 2 scoops) de poudre dans 200 ml d'eau, de jus végétal, de lait d’amande. Secouer jusqu'à dissolution complète. Notre Protéine Végétale Bio peut aussi s’intégrer dans différentes préparations du quotidien.

Can it replace a meal?

Non, notre mix de protéines végétales n’est pas un substitut de repas. En revanche, il peut s'intégrer à vos  petit-déjeuners, déjeuners et dîners. Il a même été pensé pour cela…

Why did you add chia and pumpkin seed proteins to your organic proteins?

Notre mix protéique est formulé à partir de 4 sources de protéines spécifiques. Bien que les protéines de pois et de riz soient très souvent associées (pour leur complémentarité en matière d’acides aminés ; cf partie sur les acides aminés limitants dans l’onglet science), l’ajout de protéines de graines de courge et de graines de chia est une vraie particularité ! Ces deux protéines ont notamment permis d'obtenir un goût et une texture équilibrés. En plus, ces 2 ingrédients apportent bien plus que des protéines : le chia contient par exemple des fibres et aussi un peu d’oméga-3 !

Is the amino acid balance equivalent to classic whey and casein?

La whey (protéine de lait) et la caséine sont des protéines issues du lait de vache. Elles sont équilibrées en acides aminés et peuvent donc être utilisées comme source unique de protéines. Une protéine de lait présente donc d’office un indice chimique supérieur à 100 (l’indice chimique reflétant l’équilibre de la protéine).

Prises isolément, les sources de protéines végétales ne présentent jamais l’ensemble des 20 acides aminés. Notre mix associe donc 4 sources de protéines végétales (protéines de pois, de riz, de graines de courge et de chia) afin de couvrir l’ensemble du spectre de ces acides aminés (dont les 9 essentiels). Il atteint ainsi un équilibre optimal et un indice chimique équivalent et supérieur à 100 (estimé à 130).

Can I keep my shake / mix after preparation?

Nous conseillons de consommer votre shaker/mélange de notre Protéine Végétale et Bio dans la journée de préparation afin de converser le goût et la stabilité des ingrédients.

Votre shaker/mélange de protéines végétales peut se conserver toute une journée. Au-delà, le goût et la stabilité des ingrédients risquent de s’altérer.

Your Vegetable and Organic Protein contains 12 g of sugars per 100 g, is it really "low in sugars"?

Tout à fait ! 100 g représentent 4 portions (8 scoops) de notre Protéine Végétale et Bio. En étant à 2 portions par jour, notre Protéine Végétale Bio apporte alors 6 g de sucre soit un tout petit peu plus qu’un carré de sucre pur (5 g). A l’échelle d’une journée, cela représente un apport faible en sucre. Nous avons fait ce choix là aussi pour résoudre l’équation du goût sans ajouter d’édulcorants.

Can I mix it with another protein powder or other products?

- Un mélange de notre mix avec d’autres sources protéiques n’est pas nécessaire puisqu’il a été conçu pour être équilibré et apporter un aminogramme optimisé, avec 10% de BCAA.
- Notre Protéine Végétale et Bio peut être compatible avec la prise d’autres produits de nutrition sportive : BCAA ou EAA, créatine…).
- Bien entendu, les sportifs peuvent également accompagner les protéines d’autres nutraceutiques : multi, enzymes, spiruline ou encore probiotiques.

Are the proteins contained in the Nutri & Co formula dangerous for the kidneys?

Non, si vous n’avez pas de prédispositions aux problèmes rénaux. La relation entre consommation de protéines et problèmes rénaux a émergé il y a plus de 10 ans avec l’apparition des régimes hyperprotéiques (jusqu’à plus de 40% des besoins caloriques apportés par des protéines versus 12-15% dans un régime classique). Des études ont révélé que chez les personnes souffrant de problèmes rénaux, la consommation excessive de protéines a un effet néfaste sur la santé rénale. De manière générale, un apport excessif en protéines sur une période prolongée entraîne une augmentation de la production de déchets organiques (urée, acide urique, créatinine) éliminés dans les urines par filtration rénale. Des reins en bonne santé peuvent exercer leur fonction physiologique de filtration durablement.

Ainsi, en cas de doute, nous vous conseillons de réaliser une analyse d’urines ou de solliciter l’avis de votre médecin avant toute supplémentation en protéines, et le cas échéant, de ne pas dépasser la dose journalière recommandée.

En revanche, chez les personnes ne présentant pas de prédispositions de maladie rénale et qui souhaitent se supplémenter en protéines (i.e. apports journaliers supérieurs aux recommandation), dans l’optique d’une prise de masse par exemple, des apports additionnels en protéines ne présentent pas de risque.

Pour résumer : les protéines végétales sont équivalentes aux protéines alimentaires normales, le plus important étant de respecter les apports protéiques quotidiens et de les adapter selon le niveau d’activité physique.

Is your Vegetable and Organic Protein acidifying?

La question de l’acidification de l’organisme revient souvent quand on compare les protéines animales et végétales. Et les plus téméraires iront même jusqu’à regarder l’indice PRAL (“Potential Renal Acid Load“ : indice permettant d’estimer le potentiel acidifiant ou basifiant d’un aliment) de leurs aliments. Or, même s’il est tentant de considérer les aliments un à un comme une addition d’indices PRAL pour chercher à équilibrer chaque unité potentielle d’acide par une base, nous vous le déconseillons fortement. Vous souhaitez veiller à maintenir un bon équilibre acido-basique? Écoutez les conseils de votre grand-mère : continuez à manger de la viande modérément, doublez ou triplez les fruits et légumes et diminuez d’autant les céréales.

La connexion protéines et acidité vient de la présence d’acides aminés soufrés qui seraient plutôt acidifiants que leurs compères non-soufrés (entre autres). Or, en effet, notre Protéine Végétale et Bio en contient puisque nous avons optimisé son aminogramme. Mais tant que ce produit remplace une partie des autres protéines que vous consommez, il reste équivalent en termes d’acidité.

Ah et vous voulez un scoop ? Dans la période paléolithique, les humains mangeaient en moyenne 3,5 fois plus de viande que l’homme moderne, et d’après les chercheurs leur sang était moins acide… Mais comment faisaient-ils ? Vous le savez déjà : ils écoutaient leur grand-mère !

Is vitamin B12 intake sufficient to meet my B12 needs if I'm vegan?

Non, on ne peut le garantir. Sous le terme "source de B12" se cachent en fait plusieurs formes plus ou moins biodisponibles de vitamine B12. Or, chaque matrice végétale possède un profil spécifique de formes de B12 et augmente donc différemment votre statut vitaminique. Si vous suivez un régime vegan (végétalien), il reste important de suivre de près votre statut vitaminique en B12 (par simple prise de sang sur ordonnance).

Do you use protein isolates or concentrates?

Un peu des deux ! Les ingrédients riz et pois peuvent être qualifiés d’isolats (environ 80% de protéines), car ils affichent une très haute concentration en protéines. Les ingrédients chia et graines de courge sont moins concentrés en protéines (respectivement 40% et 60%) et sont plutôt qualifiés de "poudres de protéines".

Are your vegetable proteins native or hydrolyzed?

Pour assimiler toujours plus d’acides aminés, il est tentant d'utiliser des hydrolysats de protéines (on trouve fréquemment des hydrolysats de whey ou de caséine sur le marché). L’hydrolyse d’une protéine consiste à la traiter par action thermique et chimique pour la dénaturer, ou la "casser". On obtient alors un mélange contenant des protéines, des peptides et des acides aminés. L’avantage de cette technique est de "toujours plus" faciliter l’assimilation et donc l’utilisation des acides aminés par l’organisme, ce qui est notamment recherché par les bodybuilder. On peut imaginer les hydrolysats comme un entre-deux, avec d’un côté des protéines natives et complètes et de l'autre des acides aminés purs, de type BCAA (3 acides aminés branchés) ou EAA (9 acides aminés essentiels).

Notre démarche consiste à proposer un mix harmonieux de protéines végétales et bio, qui optimise l’assimilation et la digestion grâce à l’utilisation de 4 sources de protéines et de fibres, et nous avons donc fait le choix d’opter pour des protéines natives, c’est à dire non-hydrolysées.

What is the PDCAAS of your protein mix?

En théorie, la digestibilité d’une protéine pourrait être exprimée avec le PDCAAS, indice fondé sur une mesure physiologique et pour une source protéique donnée (analyse de la digestibilité fécale pondérée par l’aminogramme).

Il ne fait donc aucun sens d’exprimer le PDCAAS sur un produit fini (car la digestibilité du produit fini n’est pas équivalente à la somme de la digestibilité de chaque protéine) à part si la mesure de digestibilité fécale à bien été réalisée sur le mix.

Pas de fausses promesses chez Nutri&Co, nous ne donnons que l’indice chimique. Le fait d’équilibrer l’aminogramme avec l’utilisation de 4 sources protéiques améliore simplement la digestibilité. Si vous voyez des mix protéiques affichant un PDCAAS précis, nous vous recommandons de demander si les analyses ont bien été réalisées, ou bien si le PDCAAS affiché n’est pas plutôt celui d’une des protéines seules utilisées dans le mix...

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