Organic Fibers
Organic Fibers

Irritable bowel • Low-FODMAP

7 pods • from 1/day

Quantity :
Add to cart - €25.90
Organic Fibers

Irritable bowel • Low-FODMAP

7 pods • from 1/day

Fiber plays a central role in our diet and our health. Or, we consume an average of 20g per day, which is 10g less than the ANSES recommendation.

Certified Organic, Vegan, Low-Fodmap, our duo of Organic Fibers is the first ingredient developed by Nutri & Co. Accompanied by its digital recipe book, it makes it easy to provide soluble dietary fiber, while being suitable for the people studied. irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

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EFFECTIVENESS

Intestin Low-fodmap Irritable
bowel & Low
FODMAP

Dietary fiber: a need too often overlooked

Fiber is not a nutrient like any other since it is not assimilated by our body and therefore does not provide calories. However, they play a central role in our health and our digestion: some are fermented (digested) by the microbiota while others facilitate transit.
But today, the French consume an average of 20 g of fiber daily, which is 10 g less than the official recommendation (ANSES).

Dietary fiber is good, but soluble is even better!

The so-called "insoluble" fibers (like those of wheat bran) have as their main action the regulation of transit by mechanical action. We sometimes talk about irritating fibers.
As for "soluble" fibers, they are digested by our microbiota, promoting its growth and diversity. We can speak of a "prebiotic" effect. However, all soluble fibers are not equal: this is why we have favored in our organic formula two soluble fibers (acacia and guar) whose clinical studies have shown their very good tolerance, unlike others which are less so. like chicory inulin.

Low-FODMAP fibers, suitable for people with irritable bowel (IBS)

In France, around 5% of the population has irritable bowel disease (= IBS, Irritable Bowel Syndrome or functional colopathy). For reasons of sometimes severe digestive discomfort, people suffering from this syndrome generally avoid consuming fiber, especially those considered FODMAPs *. Certified Low-FODMAP by Monash University (leader in FODMAPs research), our Organic Fiber formula is specifically designed from clinically documented dietary fiber to allow people with IBS to consume more fiber, without suffering any inconvenience. .

Neutral taste and easy dosage

Our Organic Fiber is an ingredient specifically designed by Nutri & Co to help you increase your daily fiber intake. For this, it reconciles efficiency and practicality: with approximately 5.3 g of fiber per dose, it is tasteless and odorless, perfectly soluble in hot or cold drinks, yogurts, and easily incorporated into cakes or dishes. cooked.

The development challenge was to find an optimal granulation to allow the solubility of the mix and thus easy use in your daily preparations. Our cookbook will help you adopt the right reflexes!

*Fibers qualified as FODMAP are quickly fermented by the intestinal flora (see Benefits tab).

BENEFITS

Our Organic Fiber mix is ​​a duo of soluble fibers of acacia gum and guar, it is indicated for:

  • The general population for which it is recommended to consume 25 to 30 g of fiber per day,
  • People with irritable bowel * for whom it is recommended:
    - Opt for a soluble fiber intake, 
    - To follow periods under a diet low in FODMAP **,
    - Have a non-FODMAP ** soluble fiber intake of at least 25-30 g per day.

* Irritable Bowel Syndrome, or Irritable Bowel Syndrome ("IBS" or "IBS"), is a disorder of the functioning of the bowel that disrupts the absorption, digestion, assimilation, metabolism or excretion of certain foods. In people with IBS, consuming “classic” fibers (containing FODMAPs) leads to stomach aches and transit problems:

  • Constipation,
  • Diarrhea,
  • - or both alternately,
  • Bloating,
  • Chronic stomach pain.

** FODMAPs are a category of carbohydrate compounds: F: Fermentable (fermentable) - O: Oligosaccharides (fructans and galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS)) - D: Disaccharides - M: Monosaccharides - A: and (et) - P: Polyols (sorbitol, mannitol, xylitol, maltitol… and other "-ol" compounds with sweetening power). These compounds are poorly absorbed and rapidly fermented by the intestinal bacterial flora. They are found in milk and in varying amounts in fruits and vegetables, legumes ... People with IBS avoid the consumption of these fibers and therefore have a nutritional fiber deficiency.

The "Low-FODMAP" label from the University of Monash (Australia) guarantees that our Organic Fiber duo contains a very low amount of FODMAPs. The fibers "Low-FODMAPs" make it possible to compensate for the deficiency in fibers while limiting the digestive disorders related to the consumption of fibers.

HOW TO USE

When to take our Organic Fibers duo?

  • At any time of the day!

In what setting should we take our Organic Fibers duo?

  • To increase your daily fiber intake.
  • For people with irritable bowel.

How many doses?

  • The recommendation is 1 to 5 scoops per day (or 5.3 g to 26.3 g of fiber).
  • To cover your total daily fiber intake, take 5 scoops per day, starting with 1 serving / day and increasing by one scoop every 4 days.

How to take our duo of Organic Fibers?

  • Dilute one scoop (5.3 g) in 250 ml of water (a large glass of water).    
  • For several pods, increase the volume of water accordingly.   
  • With our recipe book sent by email for any purchase, discover simple and varied ideas to integrate it into your meals.

Duration of a sachet

  • For 1 scoop per day: 1 month and a half.    
  • For 5 pods per day: 9 days.

Precautions for use

  • If more than one pod is recommended, gradually increase the number of pods per day, starting with 1 / day.    
  • Do not exceed the recommended daily doses.    
  • The product must be used under medical supervision in the context of irritable bowel.    
  • The product should not be used as the sole source of food.

Storage conditions

  • Store in a dry place away from light.    
  • Keep out of the reach of children.

Need recipe ideas?

  • Our digital recipe book, free with any purchase, will help you integrate our duo of Organic Fibers into your hot or cold preparations.
  • Our Organic Fiber formula is referenced on the Monash University FODMAP Diet application to support you in your Low-FODMAP diet.

INGREDIENTS

Per 100 g

Energy : 200 kcal / 813 KJ

Fat : 0,3 g
of which saturated fatty acids : 0,3 g

Total carbohydrates : 85,9 g
with sugar : 4,2 g

Dietary fiber : 76,8 g

Proteins : 1,9 g

Salt : 0,4 g

Ingredients: Acacia gum fibers * (47.5%), Partially hydrolyzed guar gum fibers * (47.5%), Dehydrated blueberry juice * (5%).

* Ingredients from organic farming (> 95%)

SCIENCE

Fiber consumption, a victim of our sudden changes in diet

Our food consumption patterns have evolved a lot, but above all, they have evolved very quickly. One of the publications resulting from the analysis of NutriNet Santé data (scientific work that studies the eating habits of French people) is very clear: out of a total of more than 100,000 participants followed between 2009 and 2019, the consumption of ultra-processed products and ultra-formulated (very dense in energy and with less nutritional value) comes at the expense of that of fibers [1]. Logical, since the industrialization of food has led to a decrease in the consumption of products that undergo little or no processing: raw fruits, vegetables and whole grain products. These behaviors and food choices automatically lead to a reduction in fiber consumption. In France, ANSES has established that an adequate intake of dietary fiber in adults is 30 g / day. At European level (EFSA), the recommendation is around 25 g / day. The last French INCA survey [2], carried out in 2017, revealed insufficient daily fiber intake with only 19.6 g on average. The analysis of food consumption in the NutriNet Santé cohort agrees with these values, concluding on a fiber intake of around 19.5 g / day [3]. Insufficient fiber intake has also been reported in other developed countries suggesting a real global problem [4].

Fiber, a nutrient like no other

Fibers are complex carbohydrate polymers found in the walls and internal structures of plants. There are in fact two types of fibers: soluble fibers and insoluble fibers.

Soluble fiber
These fibers are soluble in water, they are easily fermented (digested by the intestinal microbiota) and more or less viscous. Among the soluble fibers, we find: pectin, ꞵ-glucans, inulin, gums (guar and acacia for example), psyllium, konjac, resistant starch, or FOS (fructooligosaccharides) and GOS (galactooligosaccharides).

Insoluble fiber
Insoluble fiber does not undergo any digestion process, it is hardly fermented. They increase the volume of the food bolus (the mass of food coming out of the stomach) by absorbing water from the food consumed. They stimulate intestinal transit and participate in the mechanical role of digestion. Among the insoluble fibers, we find: cellulose (most present in the walls of plants), hemicelluloses and lignin.

As you can see, fiber is not digestible by humans. Indeed, our digestive tract does not have the enzymatic equipment necessary for the degradation of these carbohydrates which are then said to be "indigestible". Put more simply, these compounds are not assimilated by the body, which is why they provide almost no calories. They are nevertheless essential for the functioning of digestion, as well as intestinal and metabolic health.

But then how does it work? While the effects of insoluble fibers are overwhelmingly described for their mechanical effect on transit, the functionalities of soluble fibers can be more complex to decipher.

Focus on soluble fibers

If our body does not assimilate the fibers, our best friend the microbiota is particularly fond of it. Indeed, the bacteria in our digestive tract ferment soluble fibers and produce metabolites such as short chain fatty acids (SCFA), including the famous acetate, propionate and butyrate. In addition, the viscosity (ability to form a gel) of certain soluble fibers reduces the absorption of certain nutrients such as sugar or certain fats such as cholesterol.

Dietary sources of fiber

In our daily diet, we get fiber from fruits, vegetables, whole grains and legumes. The table below reports the fiber composition of some common foods.

AlimentQuantité de fibres D (g/100g)*
Haricots blancs bouillis15,8
Amandes (avec peau)12,5
Artichaut cuit à la vapeur10,9
Légumineuses cuites (valeur moyenne)9,3
Lentilles vertes bouillies8,5
Pain complet6,2
Pois chiches en conserve5,5
Pruneaux secs5,1
Figues crues4,1
Noix fraîches3,9
Légumes cuits (valeur moyenne)2,7
Pain baguette courante2,7
Pommes crues2,5
Riz complet cuit2,2
Pommes de terre cuites au four2,2
Fruits crus (valeur moyenne)2,0
Pâtes sèches standards cuites1,9

* The nutritional composition of foods can be viewed on the ANSES website, the National Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health Safety: https://www.anses.fr/fr/content/la-table -of-nutritional-composition-of-ciqual

Fiber and health

Eating patterns can be classified, in a fairly simplified way, into two types:

  • "reasonable", Mediterranean type, (varied and diverse, rich in source of fiber and polyphenols, quality of fats controlled),
  • "Western", or "modern" (poorly varied and diverse, rich in energy dense foods and low quality sugars, low in antioxidants).

Large dietary components differentiate these two types of models, and research has been conducted on their difference in impact on health. This research has shown a positive impact of the varied and diversified diet, Mediterranean type, on long-term health, including digestive health [7–9]. A closer look at these two eating patterns reveals that Mediterranean diets contain a lot of foods that are sources of fiber, which is a major differentiator.

Among the health functions of these diets rich in fiber, one distinguishes their prebiotic potential, that is to say their ability to "nourish" our intestinal microbiota, to increase its individual diversity and to promote the production of AGCC (acids short chain fat). This diversity of species (in number and in species) guarantees a "normal" and "healthy" ecosystem for an individual.

Although there are very significant interindividual variabilities, a loss of microbial diversity is correlated with the increased prevalence of certain digestive and metabolic pathologies [9–11]. From a physiological standpoint, the production of AGCC is known to be beneficial locally (intestine) and peripherally (elsewhere in the body). Locally, butyrate is a source of energy for intestinal cells (cell proliferation), it has anti-inflammatory and immune regulation action. SCFAs (butyrate, propionate and acetate) also act on the periphery of the intestines on various metabolic pathways in the liver, muscle, adipose tissue and the brain. It is in this context that we talk about the action of the microbiota on energy homeostasis [12,13]. As a result, it is estimated that the intestinal microbiota has an absolutely decisive intermediary role in our health and more specifically in the appearance of chronic discomfort. This role is reflected in particular by a targeted action at the intestinal level so as to preserve the integrity of the intestinal barrier and by maintaining a controlled regulation of the immune response. Within the framework of a "Western" diet model, a loss of balance of these functions is observed, making the intestinal barrier vulnerable and creating a window of opportunity for the installation of a pro-inflammatory status [7 ].

In summary, good digestive and metabolic health is correlated with a healthy microbiota. And the good health of the microbiota, especially in terms of diversity, is itself correlated with the diet and its high fiber content.

IMG à UPLOADER
Adapté de [7]

In general, although there are still differences between soluble and insoluble fiber, the health effects of consuming foods high in fiber are well established [14–16]:

  • Improvement of intestinal disorders: regulation of transit and prebiotic supply,    
  • Weight control: increase in the volume of the food bolus and slowing down of digestion (satiating effect),    
  • Blood sugar control (blood sugar level): slowing sugar absorption (limiting blood sugar spikes) and reducing the propensity to "fat" with excess sugar,    
  • Cholesterolemia control (LDL level in the blood): captures cholesterol that can be eliminated in the stool.

Interestingly, it has been reported in prospective studies a significant reduction in the risk of certain long-term health parameters with each increase of 7 g / d of fiber [17].
In France, research teams from the NutriNet Santé cohort (2009-2019; prospective study) studied the associations between fiber consumption and long-term health risks. Fiber consumption was broken down by type of fiber: insoluble, soluble, or both, and by type of source: fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, potatoes and other tubers (107,377 participants included). In this cohort, 92.5% of people do not meet the fiber recommendations. The analyzes have established a positive relationship between an overall intake of fiber, both soluble and insoluble, with long-term health. This relationship would be all the stronger for soluble fiber from fruit. In addition, people who had a higher level of fiber consumption had a greater local diversity of their gut microbiota [3]. Of course, other studies are still needed to confirm the relationships between the different types of fibers and the risks of chronic pathologies.

The general conclusion of these data highlights that the consumption of fiber, by favoring a variety of sources, must be encouraged in response to insufficient dietary intakes, i.e. 30 g of fiber per day instead of 19 , 6 g per day observed in France.

The problem of irritable bowel syndrome

The World Organization for Gastroenterology (WGO) defines irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or irritable bowel syndrome or functional colopathy, as "a functional bowel disorder in which abdominal pain or discomfort is associated with defecation and / or a change in bowel habit ". IBS is a fairly common disorder that affects around 11% of the world's adult population and nearly 5% in France.
This prevalence varies between countries and affects three times as many women as men [18–20]. Several causes or triggers are suspected. In any case, it would seem that the origin is multifactorial:

  • Food    
  • Psychic factors (stress type)    
  • Infections    
  • Microbiota health (richness and diversity)    
  • Genetic factors

IBS is a recurrent disorder established by precise clinical criteria (the Rome IV criteria: stool texture, frequency of pain episodes, etc.). In the absence of detectable organic causes and without specific biological markers, the diagnosis is thus based on symptoms [21]. However, IBS remains a difficult pathology to diagnose and can be associated with a diagnosis of exclusion of other pathologies such as Crohn's disease, sensitivity to non-celiac gluten.
In general, this chronic syndrome includes recurrent and / or chronic clinical signs of abdominal pain, discomfort and intestinal transit disorders:

  • Constipation or diarrhea (or both alternately),
  • Bloating,
  • Chronic stomach aches.

Overall, IBS causes disturbance and / or decrease in the absorption, digestion, assimilation, metabolization or excretion capacities of ordinary foods or of some of their ingredients or metabolites. These manifestations lead to an important problem, that of the risk of nutritional deficiency.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Fiber Consumption

Fiber is a compound that is difficult for people with irritable bowel to digest. Indeed, they are likely to cause characteristic digestive disorders such as bloating [21]. Consequence: People with IBS avoid dietary fiber because of the discomfort it causes, even though it is essential for their health ...
As we recall here, two categories of fibers exist according to their solubility: soluble fibers and insoluble fibers. As part of the diets followed by people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), there is a consensus in principle that a controlled FODMAP diet (see below) can be considered temporarily (especially if general advice on diet and lifestyle prove ineffective).

The term FODMAP refers to a set of poorly absorbed and rapidly fermented short-chain fermentable carbohydrates that are naturally present in many foods:

  • F: Fermentable (fermentable),
  • O: Oligosaccharides (fructans and galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS)),
  • D: Disaccharides,
  • M: Monosaccharides,
  • A: and (and),
  • P: Polyols (sorbitol, mannitol, xylitol, maltitol… and other "-ol" compounds with sweetening power). Therefore, people with IBS may need to adopt a low-FODMAP ("low-FODMAP") diet.

Here are some examples of foods high in FODMAP:

  • Fructans: onions, garlic, wheat, rye, peaches, watermelon,
  • GOS: legumes,Lactose (disaccharide): milk, ice cream,
  • Fructose in excess of glucose: honey, fruit juice, dried fruit, apple, pear, mango,
  • Mannitol (polyol): apples, cherries, nectarines, plums,
  • Sorbitol (polyol): avocado, mushrooms, cauliflower, snow peas, sugar-free products.

In practice, people with irritable bowels will seek to limit their intake of foods rich in FODMAPs. So how do you exclude FODMAP-type fibers without sacrificing all dietary fiber?

Dietary advice and medical follow-up are the keys to the success of this complex dietary approach. A skilled and experienced healthcare professional can provide a detailed diet plan that will ensure a nutritionally adequate low-FODMAP diet. To find out more, visit the websites of the SNFGE or the DigestScience foundation.

Australian Monash University is a pioneer and leader in FODMAP research in a country where 1 in 7 people have irritable bowel syndrome. This university has worked to set up a "low-FODMAP" certification program in order to offer appropriate and trusted products. The program is now well established and includes products from companies around the world (Australia, US, Canada and Europe) and well known. Associated with this program, an application ("Monash University FODMAP Diet" on which our Organic Fibers is referenced) and a site provided on the SII environment and FODMAPs have been developed (site: https://www.monashfodmap.com/ )

Nutri & Co Organic Fibers: fibers for all certified "Low-FODMAP"

Our Organic Fiber mix results from the development of an exclusive ingredient combining two types of fibers: guar fibers and acacia fibers. A unique solution to allow everyone to increase their fiber intake but also for people with irritable bowel while limiting the inconvenience associated with the consumption of certain fibers.

Characteristics of selected fibers
Our organic fiber "Low-FODMAP" ingredient has been formulated for:

  • increase your fiber intake simply and efficiently,    
  • meet the fiber needs and more specifically the pronounced deficits in people with irritable bowel.

For this ingredient, Nutri & Co has selected two soluble fibers whose physicochemical properties (including optimal viscosity) allow them to be slowly fermented by the intestinal microbiota:

  • Partially hydrolyzed guar gum fibers (galactomannan),
  • Acacia gum fibers (arabinogalactan).

Clinical data of our selected fibers on the IBS
Acacia fiber [22] and partially hydrolyzed guar fiber [23,24] have been studied in the context of irritable bowel. They showed good tolerance in people with irritable bowel, indicating that they could be taken as a daily supplement to alleviate the fiber deficit.

The recommendations

  • Our Organic Fibers are not defined as a formulation to directly reduce the symptoms of irritable bowel.    
  • Our Organic Fibers make it possible to compensate for the potential fiber deficiency in the event of irritable colon.    
  • This is why our Bio Fiber duo is suitable for a diet low in FODMAP ("Low-FODMAP") and should be integrated into a structured diet under the supervision of a doctor / dietitian in case of IBS.  Icône de validation par la communauté.

Publications

  1. Beslay, M.; Srour, B.; Méjean, C.; Allès, B.; Fiolet, T.; Debras, C.; Chazelas, E.; Deschasaux, M.; Wendeu-Foyet, M.G.; Hercberg, S.; et al. Ultra-Processed Food Intake in Association with BMI Change and Risk of Overweight and Obesity: A Prospective Analysis of the French NutriNet-Santé Cohort. PLOS Med. 2020, 17, e1003256, doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1003256.
  2. ANSES Etude Individuelle Nationale Des Consommations Alimentaires 3 (INCA 3). Avis de l’ANSES. Rapport d’expertise Collective; 2017; p. 566;
  3. Partula, V.; Deschasaux, M.; Druesne-Pecollo, N.; Latino-Martel, P.; Desmetz, E.; Chazelas, E.; Kesse-Guyot, E.; Julia, C.; Fezeu, L.K.; Galan, P.; et al. Associations between Consumption of Dietary Fibers and the Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases, Cancers, Type 2 Diabetes, and Mortality in the Prospective NutriNet-Santé Cohort. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 2020, 112, 195–207, doi:10.1093/ajcn/nqaa063.
  4. Stephen, A.M.; Champ, M.M.-J.; Cloran, S.J.; Fleith, M.; van Lieshout, L.; Mejborn, H.; Burley, V.J. Dietary Fibre in Europe: Current State of Knowledge on Definitions, Sources, Recommendations, Intakes and Relationships to Health. Nutr. Res. Rev. 2017, 30, 149–190, doi:10.1017/S095442241700004X.
  5. Mcrorie, J.W.; Fahey, G.C. A Review of Gastrointestinal Physiology and the Mechanisms Underlying the Health Benefits of Dietary Fiber: Matching an Effective Fiber with Specific Patient Needs. Clin. Nurs. Stud. 2013, 1, p82, doi:10.5430/cns.v1n4p82.
  6. McRorie, J.W. Evidence-Based Approach to Fiber Supplements and Clinically Meaningful Health Benefits, Part 1: What to Look for and How to Recommend an Effective Fiber Therapy. Nutr. Today 2015, 50, 82–89, doi:10.1097/NT.0000000000000082.
  7. Makki, K.; Deehan, E.C.; Walter, J.; Bäckhed, F. The Impact of Dietary Fiber on Gut Microbiota in Host Health and Disease. Cell Host Microbe 2018, 23, 705–715, doi:10.1016/j.chom.2018.05.012.
  8. Reynolds, A.; Mann, J.; Cummings, J.; Winter, N.; Mete, E.; Te Morenga, L. Carbohydrate Quality and Human Health: A Series of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. The Lancet 2019, 393, 434–445, doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(18)31809-9.
  9. Nagpal, R.; Shively, C.A.; Register, T.C.; Craft, S.; Yadav, H. Gut Microbiome-Mediterranean Diet Interactions in Improving Host Health. F1000Research 2019, 8, 699, doi:10.12688/f1000research.18992.1.
  10. Mosca, A.; Leclerc, M.; Hugot, J.P. Gut Microbiota Diversity and Human Diseases: Should We Reintroduce Key Predators in Our Ecosystem? Front. Microbiol. 2016, 7, doi:10.3389/fmicb.2016.00455.
  11. Myhrstad, M.C.W.; Tunsjø, H.; Charnock, C.; Telle-Hansen, V.H. Dietary Fiber, Gut Microbiota, and Metabolic Regulation—Current Status in Human Randomized Trials. Nutrients 2020, 12, 859, doi:10.3390/nu12030859.
  12. Canfora, E.E.; Jocken, J.W.; Blaak, E.E. Short-Chain Fatty Acids in Control of Body Weight and Insulin Sensitivity. Nat. Rev. Endocrinol. 2015, 11, 577–591, doi:10.1038/nrendo.2015.128.
  13. Byrne, C.S.; Chambers, E.S.; Morrison, D.J.; Frost, G. The Role of Short Chain Fatty Acids in Appetite Regulation and Energy Homeostasis. Int. J. Obes. 2015, 39, 1331–1338, doi:10.1038/ijo.2015.84.
  14. Anderson, J.W.; Baird, P.; Davis Jr, R.H.; Ferreri, S.; Knudtson, M.; Koraym, A.; Waters, V.; Williams, C.L. Health Benefits of Dietary Fiber. Nutr. Rev. 2009, 67, 188–205, doi:10.1111/j.1753-4887.2009.00189.x.
  15. Slavin, J. Fiber and Prebiotics: Mechanisms and Health Benefits. Nutrients 2013, 5, 1417–1435, doi:10.3390/nu5041417.
  16. Mattea Müller; Emanuel Canfora; Ellen Blaak Gastrointestinal Transit Time, Glucose Homeostasis and Metabolic Health: Modulation by Dietary Fibers. Nutrients 2018, 10, 275, doi:10.3390/nu10030275.
  17. Lockyer, S.; Spiro, A.; Stanner, S. Dietary Fibre and the Prevention of Chronic Disease – Should Health Professionals Be Doing More to Raise Awareness? Nutr. Bull. 2016, 41, 214–231, doi:10.1111/nbu.12212.
  18. Lovell, R.M.; Ford, A.C. Global Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis. Clin. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. 2012, 10, 712-721.e4, doi:10.1016/j.cgh.2012.02.029
  19. Canavan, C.; West, J.; Card, T. The Epidemiology of Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Clin. Epidemiol. 2014, 71, doi:10.2147/CLEP.S40245.
  20. SNFGE Syndrome de l’intestin Irritable Available online: https://www.snfge.org/content/syndrome-de-lintestin-irritable.
  21. Zisimopoulou, S.; Guessous, I. Syndrome de l’intestin Irritable: Un Diagnostic d’exclusion? Rev. Médicale Suisse 2012, 1821–1825.
  22. Min, Y.W. Effect of Composite Yogurt Enriched with Acacia Fiber and Bifidobacterium Lactis. World J. Gastroenterol. 2012, 18, 4563, doi:10.3748/wjg.v18.i33.4563.
  23. Niv, E.; Halak, A.; Tiommny, E.; Yanai, H.; Strul, H.; Naftali, T.; Vaisman, N. Randomized Clinical Study: Partially Hydrolyzed Guar Gum (PHGG) versus Placebo in the Treatment of Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Nutr. Metab. 2016, 13, 10, doi:10.1186/s12986-016-0070-5.
  24. Yasukawa, Z.; Inoue, R.; Ozeki, M.; Okubo, T.; Takagi, T.; Honda, A.; Naito, Y. Effect of Repeated Consumption of Partially Hydrolyzed Guar Gum on Fecal Characteristics and Gut Microbiota: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, and Parallel-Group Clinical Trial. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2170, doi:10.3390/nu11092170.
EFFECTIVENESS
BENEFITS
HOW TO USE IT
INGREDIENTS
SCIENCE
Intestin Low-fodmap Irritable
bowel & Low
FODMAP

Dietary fiber: a need too often overlooked
Fiber is not a nutrient like any other since it is not assimilated by our body and therefore does not provide calories. However, they play a central role in our health and our digestion: some are fermented (digested) by the microbiota while others facilitate transit.
But today, the French consume an average of 20 g of fiber daily, which is 10 g less than the official recommendation (ANSES).

Dietary fiber is good, but soluble is even better!
The so-called "insoluble" fibers (like those of wheat bran) have as their main action the regulation of transit by mechanical action. We sometimes talk about irritating fibers.
As for "soluble" fibers, they are digested by our microbiota, promoting its growth and diversity. We can speak of a "prebiotic" effect. However, all soluble fibers are not equal: this is why we have favored in our organic formula two soluble fibers (acacia and guar) whose clinical studies have shown their very good tolerance, unlike others which are less so. like chicory inulin.

Low-FODMAP fibers, suitable for people with irritable bowel (IBS)
In France, around 5% of the population has irritable bowel disease (= IBS, Irritable Bowel Syndrome or functional colopathy). For reasons of sometimes severe digestive discomfort, people suffering from this syndrome generally avoid consuming fiber, especially those considered FODMAPs *. Certified Low-FODMAP by Monash University (leader in FODMAPs research), our Organic Fiber formula is specifically designed from clinically documented dietary fiber to allow people with IBS to consume more fiber, without suffering any inconvenience. .

Neutral taste and easy dosage
Our Organic Fiber is an ingredient specifically designed by Nutri & Co to help you increase your daily fiber intake. For this, it reconciles efficiency and practicality: with approximately 5.3 g of fiber per dose, it is tasteless and odorless, perfectly soluble in hot or cold drinks, yogurts, and easily incorporated into cakes or dishes. cooked.

The development challenge was to find an optimal granulation to allow the solubility of the mix and thus easy use in your daily preparations. Our cookbook will help you adopt the right reflexes!

*Fibers qualified as FODMAP are quickly fermented by the intestinal flora (see Benefits tab).

Our Organic Fiber mix is ​​a duo of soluble fibers of acacia gum and guar, it is indicated for:

  • The general population for which it is recommended to consume 25 to 30 g of fiber per day,
  • People with irritable bowel * for whom it is recommended:
    - Opt for a soluble fiber intake, 
    - To follow periods under a diet low in FODMAP **,
    - Have a non-FODMAP ** soluble fiber intake of at least 25-30 g per day.

* Irritable Bowel Syndrome, or Irritable Bowel Syndrome ("IBS" or "IBS"), is a disorder of the functioning of the bowel that disrupts the absorption, digestion, assimilation, metabolism or excretion of certain foods. In people with IBS, consuming “classic” fibers (containing FODMAPs) leads to stomach aches and transit problems:

  • Constipation,
  • Diarrhea,
  • - or both alternately,
  • Bloating,
  • Chronic stomach pain.

** FODMAPs are a category of carbohydrate compounds: F: Fermentable (fermentable) - O: Oligosaccharides (fructans and galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS)) - D: Disaccharides - M: Monosaccharides - A: and (et) - P: Polyols (sorbitol, mannitol, xylitol, maltitol… and other "-ol" compounds with sweetening power). These compounds are poorly absorbed and rapidly fermented by the intestinal bacterial flora. They are found in milk and in varying amounts in fruits and vegetables, legumes ... People with IBS avoid the consumption of these fibers and therefore have a nutritional fiber deficiency.

The "Low-FODMAP" label from the University of Monash (Australia) guarantees that our Organic Fiber duo contains a very low amount of FODMAPs. The fibers "Low-FODMAPs" make it possible to compensate for the deficiency in fibers while limiting the digestive disorders related to the consumption of fibers.

When to take our Organic Fibers duo?

  • At any time of the day!

In what setting should we take our Organic Fibers duo?

  • To increase your daily fiber intake.
  • For people with irritable bowel.

How many doses?

  • The recommendation is 1 to 5 scoops per day (or 5.3 g to 26.3 g of fiber).
  • To cover your total daily fiber intake, take 5 scoops per day, starting with 1 serving / day and increasing by one scoop every 4 days.

How to take our duo of Organic Fibers?

  • Dilute one scoop (5.3 g) in 250 ml of water (a large glass of water).    
  • For several pods, increase the volume of water accordingly.   
  • With our recipe book sent by email for any purchase, discover simple and varied ideas to integrate it into your meals.

Duration of a sachet

  • For 1 scoop per day: 1 month and a half.    
  • For 5 pods per day: 9 days.

Precautions for use

  • If more than one pod is recommended, gradually increase the number of pods per day, starting with 1 / day.    
  • Do not exceed the recommended daily doses.    
  • The product must be used under medical supervision in the context of irritable bowel.    
  • The product should not be used as the sole source of food.

Storage conditions

  • Store in a dry place away from light.    
  • Keep out of the reach of children.

Need recipe ideas?

  • Our digital recipe book, free with any purchase, will help you integrate our duo of Organic Fibers into your hot or cold preparations.
  • Our Organic Fiber formula is referenced on the Monash University FODMAP Diet application to support you in your Low-FODMAP diet.

Per 100 g

Energy : 200 kcal / 813 KJ

Fat : 0,3 g
of which saturated fatty acids : 0,3 g

Total carbohydrates : 85,9 g
with sugar : 4,2 g

Dietary fiber : 76,8 g

Proteins : 1,9 g

Salt : 0,4 g

Ingredients: Acacia gum fibers * (47.5%), Partially hydrolyzed guar gum fibers * (47.5%), Dehydrated blueberry juice * (5%).

* Ingredients from organic farming (> 95%)

Fiber consumption, a victim of our sudden changes in diet
Our food consumption patterns have evolved a lot, but above all, they have evolved very quickly. One of the publications resulting from the analysis of NutriNet Santé data (scientific work that studies the eating habits of French people) is very clear: out of a total of more than 100,000 participants followed between 2009 and 2019, the consumption of ultra-processed products and ultra-formulated (very dense in energy and with less nutritional value) comes at the expense of that of fibers [1]. Logical, since the industrialization of food has led to a decrease in the consumption of products that undergo little or no processing: raw fruits, vegetables and whole grain products. These behaviors and food choices automatically lead to a reduction in fiber consumption. In France, ANSES has established that an adequate intake of dietary fiber in adults is 30 g / day. At European level (EFSA), the recommendation is around 25 g / day. The last French INCA survey [2], carried out in 2017, revealed insufficient daily fiber intake with only 19.6 g on average. The analysis of food consumption in the NutriNet Santé cohort agrees with these values, concluding on a fiber intake of around 19.5 g / day [3]. Insufficient fiber intake has also been reported in other developed countries suggesting a real global problem [4].

Fiber, a nutrient like no other
Fibers are complex carbohydrate polymers found in the walls and internal structures of plants. There are in fact two types of fibers: soluble fibers and insoluble fibers.

Soluble fiber
These fibers are soluble in water, they are easily fermented (digested by the intestinal microbiota) and more or less viscous. Among the soluble fibers, we find: pectin, ꞵ-glucans, inulin, gums (guar and acacia for example), psyllium, konjac, resistant starch, or FOS (fructooligosaccharides) and GOS (galactooligosaccharides).

Insoluble fiber
Insoluble fiber does not undergo any digestion process, it is hardly fermented. They increase the volume of the food bolus (the mass of food coming out of the stomach) by absorbing water from the food consumed. They stimulate intestinal transit and participate in the mechanical role of digestion. Among the insoluble fibers, we find: cellulose (most present in the walls of plants), hemicelluloses and lignin.

As you can see, fiber is not digestible by humans. Indeed, our digestive tract does not have the enzymatic equipment necessary for the degradation of these carbohydrates which are then said to be "indigestible". Put more simply, these compounds are not assimilated by the body, which is why they provide almost no calories. They are nevertheless essential for the functioning of digestion, as well as intestinal and metabolic health.

But then how does it work? While the effects of insoluble fibers are overwhelmingly described for their mechanical effect on transit, the functionalities of soluble fibers can be more complex to decipher.

Focus on soluble fibers
If our body does not assimilate the fibers, our best friend the microbiota is particularly fond of it. Indeed, the bacteria in our digestive tract ferment soluble fibers and produce metabolites such as short chain fatty acids (SCFA), including the famous acetate, propionate and butyrate. In addition, the viscosity (ability to form a gel) of certain soluble fibers reduces the absorption of certain nutrients such as sugar or certain fats such as cholesterol.

Dietary sources of fiber
In our daily diet, we get fiber from fruits, vegetables, whole grains and legumes. The table below reports the fiber composition of some common foods.

AlimentQuantité de fibres D (g/100g)*
Haricots blancs bouillis15,8
Amandes (avec peau)12,5
Artichaut cuit à la vapeur10,9
Légumineuses cuites (valeur moyenne)9,3
Lentilles vertes bouillies8,5
Pain complet6,2
Pois chiches en conserve5,5
Pruneaux secs5,1
Figues crues4,1
Noix fraîches3,9
Légumes cuits (valeur moyenne)2,7
Pain baguette courante2,7
Pommes crues2,5
Riz complet cuit2,2
Pommes de terre cuites au four2,2
Fruits crus (valeur moyenne)2,0
Pâtes sèches standards cuites1,9

* The nutritional composition of foods can be viewed on the ANSES website, the National Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health Safety: https://www.anses.fr/fr/content/la-table -of-nutritional-composition-of-ciqual

Fiber and health
Eating patterns can be classified, in a fairly simplified way, into two types:

  • "reasonable", Mediterranean type, (varied and diverse, rich in source of fiber and polyphenols, quality of fats controlled),
  • "Western", or "modern" (poorly varied and diverse, rich in energy dense foods and low quality sugars, low in antioxidants).

Large dietary components differentiate these two types of models, and research has been conducted on their difference in impact on health. This research has shown a positive impact of the varied and diversified diet, Mediterranean type, on long-term health, including digestive health [7–9]. A closer look at these two eating patterns reveals that Mediterranean diets contain a lot of foods that are sources of fiber, which is a major differentiator.

Among the health functions of these diets rich in fiber, one distinguishes their prebiotic potential, that is to say their ability to "nourish" our intestinal microbiota, to increase its individual diversity and to promote the production of AGCC (acids short chain fat). This diversity of species (in number and in species) guarantees a "normal" and "healthy" ecosystem for an individual.

Although there are very significant interindividual variabilities, a loss of microbial diversity is correlated with the increased prevalence of certain digestive and metabolic pathologies [9–11]. From a physiological standpoint, the production of AGCC is known to be beneficial locally (intestine) and peripherally (elsewhere in the body). Locally, butyrate is a source of energy for intestinal cells (cell proliferation), it has anti-inflammatory and immune regulation action. SCFAs (butyrate, propionate and acetate) also act on the periphery of the intestines on various metabolic pathways in the liver, muscle, adipose tissue and the brain. It is in this context that we talk about the action of the microbiota on energy homeostasis [12,13]. As a result, it is estimated that the intestinal microbiota has an absolutely decisive intermediary role in our health and more specifically in the appearance of chronic discomfort. This role is reflected in particular by a targeted action at the intestinal level so as to preserve the integrity of the intestinal barrier and by maintaining a controlled regulation of the immune response. Within the framework of a "Western" diet model, a loss of balance of these functions is observed, making the intestinal barrier vulnerable and creating a window of opportunity for the installation of a pro-inflammatory status [7 ].

In summary, good digestive and metabolic health is correlated with a healthy microbiota. And the good health of the microbiota, especially in terms of diversity, is itself correlated with the diet and its high fiber content.


Adapté de [7]

In general, although there are still differences between soluble and insoluble fiber, the health effects of consuming foods high in fiber are well established [14–16]:

  • Improvement of intestinal disorders: regulation of transit and prebiotic supply,    
  • Weight control: increase in the volume of the food bolus and slowing down of digestion (satiating effect),    
  • Blood sugar control (blood sugar level): slowing sugar absorption (limiting blood sugar spikes) and reducing the propensity to "fat" with excess sugar,    
  • Cholesterolemia control (LDL level in the blood): captures cholesterol that can be eliminated in the stool.

Interestingly, it has been reported in prospective studies a significant reduction in the risk of certain long-term health parameters with each increase of 7 g / d of fiber [17].
In France, research teams from the NutriNet Santé cohort (2009-2019; prospective study) studied the associations between fiber consumption and long-term health risks. Fiber consumption was broken down by type of fiber: insoluble, soluble, or both, and by type of source: fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, potatoes and other tubers (107,377 participants included). In this cohort, 92.5% of people do not meet the fiber recommendations. The analyzes have established a positive relationship between an overall intake of fiber, both soluble and insoluble, with long-term health. This relationship would be all the stronger for soluble fiber from fruit. In addition, people who had a higher level of fiber consumption had a greater local diversity of their gut microbiota [3]. Of course, other studies are still needed to confirm the relationships between the different types of fibers and the risks of chronic pathologies.

The general conclusion of these data highlights that the consumption of fiber, by favoring a variety of sources, must be encouraged in response to insufficient dietary intakes, i.e. 30 g of fiber per day instead of 19 , 6 g per day observed in France.

The problem of irritable bowel syndrome
The World Organization for Gastroenterology (WGO) defines irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or irritable bowel syndrome or functional colopathy, as "a functional bowel disorder in which abdominal pain or discomfort is associated with defecation and / or a change in bowel habit ". IBS is a fairly common disorder that affects around 11% of the world's adult population and nearly 5% in France.
This prevalence varies between countries and affects three times as many women as men [18–20]. Several causes or triggers are suspected. In any case, it would seem that the origin is multifactorial:

  • Food    
  • Psychic factors (stress type)    
  • Infections    
  • Microbiota health (richness and diversity)    
  • Genetic factors

IBS is a recurrent disorder established by precise clinical criteria (the Rome IV criteria: stool texture, frequency of pain episodes, etc.). In the absence of detectable organic causes and without specific biological markers, the diagnosis is thus based on symptoms [21]. However, IBS remains a difficult pathology to diagnose and can be associated with a diagnosis of exclusion of other pathologies such as Crohn's disease, sensitivity to non-celiac gluten.
In general, this chronic syndrome includes recurrent and / or chronic clinical signs of abdominal pain, discomfort and intestinal transit disorders:

  • Constipation or diarrhea (or both alternately),
  • Bloating,
  • Chronic stomach aches.

Overall, IBS causes disturbance and / or decrease in the absorption, digestion, assimilation, metabolization or excretion capacities of ordinary foods or of some of their ingredients or metabolites. These manifestations lead to an important problem, that of the risk of nutritional deficiency.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Fiber Consumption
Fiber is a compound that is difficult for people with irritable bowel to digest. Indeed, they are likely to cause characteristic digestive disorders such as bloating [21]. Consequence: People with IBS avoid dietary fiber because of the discomfort it causes, even though it is essential for their health ...
As we recall here, two categories of fibers exist according to their solubility: soluble fibers and insoluble fibers. As part of the diets followed by people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), there is a consensus in principle that a controlled FODMAP diet (see below) can be considered temporarily (especially if general advice on diet and lifestyle prove ineffective).

The term FODMAP refers to a set of poorly absorbed and rapidly fermented short-chain fermentable carbohydrates that are naturally present in many foods:

  • F: Fermentable (fermentable),
  • O: Oligosaccharides (fructans and galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS)),
  • D: Disaccharides,
  • M: Monosaccharides,
  • A: and (and),
  • P: Polyols (sorbitol, mannitol, xylitol, maltitol… and other "-ol" compounds with sweetening power). Therefore, people with IBS may need to adopt a low-FODMAP ("low-FODMAP") diet.

Here are some examples of foods high in FODMAP:

  • Fructans: onions, garlic, wheat, rye, peaches, watermelon,
  • GOS: legumes,Lactose (disaccharide): milk, ice cream,
  • Fructose in excess of glucose: honey, fruit juice, dried fruit, apple, pear, mango,
  • Mannitol (polyol): apples, cherries, nectarines, plums,
  • Sorbitol (polyol): avocado, mushrooms, cauliflower, snow peas, sugar-free products.

In practice, people with irritable bowels will seek to limit their intake of foods rich in FODMAPs. So how do you exclude FODMAP-type fibers without sacrificing all dietary fiber?

Dietary advice and medical follow-up are the keys to the success of this complex dietary approach. A skilled and experienced healthcare professional can provide a detailed diet plan that will ensure a nutritionally adequate low-FODMAP diet. To find out more, visit the websites of the SNFGE or the DigestScience foundation.

Australian Monash University is a pioneer and leader in FODMAP research in a country where 1 in 7 people have irritable bowel syndrome. This university has worked to set up a "low-FODMAP" certification program in order to offer appropriate and trusted products. The program is now well established and includes products from companies around the world (Australia, US, Canada and Europe) and well known. Associated with this program, an application ("Monash University FODMAP Diet" on which our Organic Fibers is referenced) and a site provided on the SII environment and FODMAPs have been developed (site: https://www.monashfodmap.com/ )

Nutri & Co Organic Fibers: fibers for all certified "Low-FODMAP"
Our Organic Fiber mix results from the development of an exclusive ingredient combining two types of fibers: guar fibers and acacia fibers. A unique solution to allow everyone to increase their fiber intake but also for people with irritable bowel while limiting the inconvenience associated with the consumption of certain fibers.

Characteristics of selected fibers
Our organic fiber "Low-FODMAP" ingredient has been formulated for:

  • increase your fiber intake simply and efficiently,    
  • meet the fiber needs and more specifically the pronounced deficits in people with irritable bowel.

For this ingredient, Nutri & Co has selected two soluble fibers whose physicochemical properties (including optimal viscosity) allow them to be slowly fermented by the intestinal microbiota:

  • Partially hydrolyzed guar gum fibers (galactomannan),
  • Acacia gum fibers (arabinogalactan).

Clinical data of our selected fibers on the IBS
Acacia fiber [22] and partially hydrolyzed guar fiber [23,24] have been studied in the context of irritable bowel. They showed good tolerance in people with irritable bowel, indicating that they could be taken as a daily supplement to alleviate the fiber deficit.

The recommendations

  • Our Organic Fibers are not defined as a formulation to directly reduce the symptoms of irritable bowel.    
  • Our Organic Fibers make it possible to compensate for the potential fiber deficiency in the event of irritable colon.    
  • This is why our Bio Fiber duo is suitable for a diet low in FODMAP ("Low-FODMAP") and should be integrated into a structured diet under the supervision of a doctor / dietitian in case of IBS.  Icône de validation par la communauté.

Publications

  1. Beslay, M.; Srour, B.; Méjean, C.; Allès, B.; Fiolet, T.; Debras, C.; Chazelas, E.; Deschasaux, M.; Wendeu-Foyet, M.G.; Hercberg, S.; et al. Ultra-Processed Food Intake in Association with BMI Change and Risk of Overweight and Obesity: A Prospective Analysis of the French NutriNet-Santé Cohort. PLOS Med. 2020, 17, e1003256, doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1003256.
  2. ANSES Etude Individuelle Nationale Des Consommations Alimentaires 3 (INCA 3). Avis de l’ANSES. Rapport d’expertise Collective; 2017; p. 566;
  3. Partula, V.; Deschasaux, M.; Druesne-Pecollo, N.; Latino-Martel, P.; Desmetz, E.; Chazelas, E.; Kesse-Guyot, E.; Julia, C.; Fezeu, L.K.; Galan, P.; et al. Associations between Consumption of Dietary Fibers and the Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases, Cancers, Type 2 Diabetes, and Mortality in the Prospective NutriNet-Santé Cohort. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 2020, 112, 195–207, doi:10.1093/ajcn/nqaa063.
  4. Stephen, A.M.; Champ, M.M.-J.; Cloran, S.J.; Fleith, M.; van Lieshout, L.; Mejborn, H.; Burley, V.J. Dietary Fibre in Europe: Current State of Knowledge on Definitions, Sources, Recommendations, Intakes and Relationships to Health. Nutr. Res. Rev. 2017, 30, 149–190, doi:10.1017/S095442241700004X.
  5. Mcrorie, J.W.; Fahey, G.C. A Review of Gastrointestinal Physiology and the Mechanisms Underlying the Health Benefits of Dietary Fiber: Matching an Effective Fiber with Specific Patient Needs. Clin. Nurs. Stud. 2013, 1, p82, doi:10.5430/cns.v1n4p82.
  6. McRorie, J.W. Evidence-Based Approach to Fiber Supplements and Clinically Meaningful Health Benefits, Part 1: What to Look for and How to Recommend an Effective Fiber Therapy. Nutr. Today 2015, 50, 82–89, doi:10.1097/NT.0000000000000082.
  7. Makki, K.; Deehan, E.C.; Walter, J.; Bäckhed, F. The Impact of Dietary Fiber on Gut Microbiota in Host Health and Disease. Cell Host Microbe 2018, 23, 705–715, doi:10.1016/j.chom.2018.05.012.
  8. Reynolds, A.; Mann, J.; Cummings, J.; Winter, N.; Mete, E.; Te Morenga, L. Carbohydrate Quality and Human Health: A Series of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. The Lancet 2019, 393, 434–445, doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(18)31809-9.
  9. Nagpal, R.; Shively, C.A.; Register, T.C.; Craft, S.; Yadav, H. Gut Microbiome-Mediterranean Diet Interactions in Improving Host Health. F1000Research 2019, 8, 699, doi:10.12688/f1000research.18992.1.
  10. Mosca, A.; Leclerc, M.; Hugot, J.P. Gut Microbiota Diversity and Human Diseases: Should We Reintroduce Key Predators in Our Ecosystem? Front. Microbiol. 2016, 7, doi:10.3389/fmicb.2016.00455.
  11. Myhrstad, M.C.W.; Tunsjø, H.; Charnock, C.; Telle-Hansen, V.H. Dietary Fiber, Gut Microbiota, and Metabolic Regulation—Current Status in Human Randomized Trials. Nutrients 2020, 12, 859, doi:10.3390/nu12030859.
  12. Canfora, E.E.; Jocken, J.W.; Blaak, E.E. Short-Chain Fatty Acids in Control of Body Weight and Insulin Sensitivity. Nat. Rev. Endocrinol. 2015, 11, 577–591, doi:10.1038/nrendo.2015.128.
  13. Byrne, C.S.; Chambers, E.S.; Morrison, D.J.; Frost, G. The Role of Short Chain Fatty Acids in Appetite Regulation and Energy Homeostasis. Int. J. Obes. 2015, 39, 1331–1338, doi:10.1038/ijo.2015.84.
  14. Anderson, J.W.; Baird, P.; Davis Jr, R.H.; Ferreri, S.; Knudtson, M.; Koraym, A.; Waters, V.; Williams, C.L. Health Benefits of Dietary Fiber. Nutr. Rev. 2009, 67, 188–205, doi:10.1111/j.1753-4887.2009.00189.x.
  15. Slavin, J. Fiber and Prebiotics: Mechanisms and Health Benefits. Nutrients 2013, 5, 1417–1435, doi:10.3390/nu5041417.
  16. Mattea Müller; Emanuel Canfora; Ellen Blaak Gastrointestinal Transit Time, Glucose Homeostasis and Metabolic Health: Modulation by Dietary Fibers. Nutrients 2018, 10, 275, doi:10.3390/nu10030275.
  17. Lockyer, S.; Spiro, A.; Stanner, S. Dietary Fibre and the Prevention of Chronic Disease – Should Health Professionals Be Doing More to Raise Awareness? Nutr. Bull. 2016, 41, 214–231, doi:10.1111/nbu.12212.
  18. Lovell, R.M.; Ford, A.C. Global Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis. Clin. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. 2012, 10, 712-721.e4, doi:10.1016/j.cgh.2012.02.029
  19. Canavan, C.; West, J.; Card, T. The Epidemiology of Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Clin. Epidemiol. 2014, 71, doi:10.2147/CLEP.S40245.
  20. SNFGE Syndrome de l’intestin Irritable Available online: https://www.snfge.org/content/syndrome-de-lintestin-irritable.
  21. Zisimopoulou, S.; Guessous, I. Syndrome de l’intestin Irritable: Un Diagnostic d’exclusion? Rev. Médicale Suisse 2012, 1821–1825.
  22. Min, Y.W. Effect of Composite Yogurt Enriched with Acacia Fiber and Bifidobacterium Lactis. World J. Gastroenterol. 2012, 18, 4563, doi:10.3748/wjg.v18.i33.4563.
  23. Niv, E.; Halak, A.; Tiommny, E.; Yanai, H.; Strul, H.; Naftali, T.; Vaisman, N. Randomized Clinical Study: Partially Hydrolyzed Guar Gum (PHGG) versus Placebo in the Treatment of Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Nutr. Metab. 2016, 13, 10, doi:10.1186/s12986-016-0070-5.
  24. Yasukawa, Z.; Inoue, R.; Ozeki, M.; Okubo, T.; Takagi, T.; Honda, A.; Naito, Y. Effect of Repeated Consumption of Partially Hydrolyzed Guar Gum on Fecal Characteristics and Gut Microbiota: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, and Parallel-Group Clinical Trial. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2170, doi:10.3390/nu11092170.
Low fodmap LOW FODMAP
Sans additifs without additives
Sans edulcorant without sweeteners
100% vegan 100% vegan
Made in france Made in france

Have a question?

Our experts answer to all your questions.

I already eat a lot of fruits and vegetables, do I need to take this organic fiber mix in addition?

What is eating a lot of fruits and vegetables? For some, one apple a day is already a lot, for others, 10 apples is just an average. To help you find your way around, here is a guideline: by consuming 2 fruits, 2 portions of vegetables and one portion of legumes daily, for example, the fiber intake would be around 18 g / day. We are far from the 30 g recommended daily! With this information, everyone will be able to know if our duo of Organic Fibers is interesting for them.

What is irritable bowel?

Irritable bowel syndrome, or irritable bowel syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome or functional colopathy, is a chronic disease of the functioning of the intestine that disrupts the absorption, digestion, assimilation, metabolism or excretion of certain foods. In people with IBS, consuming “classic” fibers (containing FODMAPs) leads to stomach aches and transit problems.

I am already taking your Probio², can I also take your Organic Fibers at the same time?

Absolutely, the two are very popular in our microbiota and combining them is therefore no problem, quite the contrary. Lactic ferments sometimes called "probiotics" are used for digestive discomfort. Our mix of Organic Fibers responds to a nutritional fiber deficiency. It allows you to increase your fiber intake without suffering any inconvenience (clinically proven) and can very logically be associated with taking Probio². People with IBS are particularly affected.

Can I use this product in the kitchen?

Absolutely ! Our Organic Fiber mix can be consumed in water or in food and it can be cooked. It can even add a little texture to certain preparations. You can take inspiration from our cookbook.

What is the difference between guar fiber and guar gum?

Guar gum (absent from our mix) is the raw material extracted from guar. Its gelling properties make it a very popular natural additive, but which does not have the qualities required for a soluble fiber low in FODMAP. Guar fiber, on the other hand, is obtained from guar gum by a natural hydrolysis process and is certified natural product ISO 16128. It is this ingredient that takes place in our mix.

What is the recommended daily allowance for a man and a woman?

ANSES health recommendations recommend a daily fiber intake of 30 g for men AND for women, so no difference in sex. The latest INCA study (National Individual Food Consumption Study) shows that we lack an average of 10 g per day. In an effort to optimize your fiber intake, we recommend that you gradually increase them with our Organic Fibers duo: ideally starting with 1 scoop / day (5.3 g) then increasing every 3-4 days of 1 scoop, without exceeding 5 scoops / day (26.3 g). 

Does absorbing fiber help us feel full?

In general, the consumption of fiber contributes to the feeling of fullness. This is the big difference between the consumption of whole fruit compared to the consumption of fruit juice for example.

Is it useful if I don't have digestion problems?

Fiber has a reputation for facilitating transit and relieving certain digestive discomforts. But not only ! It is also known that diets rich in fiber are associated with more favorable health parameters in the long term. Taking care of your fiber intake can therefore also be part of a health anticipation process.

I think I have irritable bowel syndrome, what should I do to check it?

It is not always easy to characterize an "irritable bowel". It is therefore important to consult a specialist doctor who can then rely on specific clinical criteria to diagnose this chronic pathology. This diagnosis may be followed by specific nutritional advice such as possibly the transitional implementation of a "Low-FODMAP" diet.

I would like to follow a "Low-FODMAP" diet, where do I start?

By seeking to exclude FODMAPs, our sources of fiber may be limited and more complex to vary. It is in this approach that our duo of Organic Fibers, certified "Low-FODMAP" (which is suitable for a low FODMAP diet) makes it possible to overcome the fiber deficit while being easy to use on a daily basis. Going further, the Monash University FODMAP Diet app has been developed to help everyone follow a low FODMAP diet. You will find all the information to get started here.

Why not inulin or chicory in your product?

Chicory is known as a natural source of inulin, a fiber with prebiotic properties considered "FODMAP" (fermented very quickly by the microbiota). Therefore, inulin, and by extension chicory, are not recommended for people with irritable bowel syndrome. For our duo of Organic Fibers we have selected two fibers of guar and acacia which, they are not considered as FODMAP and well tolerated by all, including people suffering from irritable bowel.

Are your products a fiber-based dietary supplement?

No, it is not a food supplement but a DADFMS (Foodstuff For Special Medical Purposes). We can talk about a nutritional supplement specifically dedicated to people suffering from irritable bowel, allowing them to consume fiber without suffering any inconvenience. However, it is suitable for the general population.

Does your mix of Organic Fibers facilitate transit?

A transit that is sometimes too fast or on the contrary too slow, can cause inconvenience. Although the function of fibers on intestinal transit is more attributed to insoluble fiber, soluble fibers may contribute, to a lesser extent, to modify transit in the event of disturbances. Our duo of Organic Fibers can thus help you regulate a transit that is too fast or too slow. Moreover, the clinical data available on the two fibers used in our mix suggest that they play a regulatory role acting "in both directions".

I see there is blueberry juice in Organic Fiber, so is it flavored?

Indeed, our Organic Fibers formula contains 5% organic blueberry juice. This juice does not give any taste or smell to the mix or to the preparations that you can make of it. On the other hand, it brings texture and color to our powder.

Is it possible to actually diet without FODMAP?

You can limit FODMAPs, but you cannot eliminate them completely. Moreover, serious labels speak of "Low-FODMAP" products, or "low in FODMAP" rather than "without FODMAP", because it is unrealistic to achieve zero FODMAP.

Where do our ingredients come from?

Origine des ingrédients du Magnésium
Development of the Organic Fiber duo
Nutri&CoAix-en-Provence, France

Organic fibers is the first exclusive ingredient developed by the Nutri & Co R&D team. It consists of two reference soluble fibers that have never been associated before: an organic acacia fiber (made in France, origin acacia Sudan and Chad), an organic guar gum fiber (made and originated in India) and a juice. of organic blueberries (manufacture and origin Ukraine).

Manufacturing • NexiraLibourne, France

Nexira has been manufacturing functional ingredients for over a century, and has enabled us to bring this tailor-made fiber mix to life in a soluble and convenient form to use, in its production facility in Libourne.

Packaging • StrapharmSaint-Hilaire-de-Loulay, Francee

Strapharm has more than 30 years of experience in Nutraceuticals and offers packaging solutions to guarantee the stability and quality of the formulations.

Map Mobile

Where do our ingredients come from?

Development of the organic fibers duo • Nutri&Co

Aix-en-Provence, France

Organic fibers is the first exclusive ingredient developed by the Nutri & Co R&D team. It consists of two reference soluble fibers that have never been associated before: an organic acacia fiber (made in France, origin acacia Sudan and Chad), an organic guar gum fiber (made and originated in India) and a juice. of organic blueberries (manufacture and origin Ukraine).

Manufacturing • Nexira

Libourne, France

Nexira has been manufacturing innovative functional ingredients for over a century, and has enabled us to bring this tailor-made fiber mix to life in a soluble and convenient form to use, in its production facility in Libourne.

Packaging • Strapharm

Saint-Hilaire-de-Loulay, France

Strapharm has more than 30 years of experience in Nutraceuticals and offers packaging solutions to guarantee the stability and quality of the formulations.

Our certified customer reviews

Those who we tested Organic Fibers approved it.
Based on 10 reviews
4,3/5
Goût agréable très bon produit
15.09.2021
Efficace et neutre en gout
31.08.2021
Ce produit crée beaucoup d’agrégats et souvent ne se dilue pas correctement même après un temps de repos. J’utilise ce produit dans ma boisson isotonique. Je n’ai vu aucune différence à l’utilisation…
15.08.2021
Rien à dire
06.08.2021
Un rituel quotidien pour faire face à mon diabète gestationnel (diabète de grossesse) !
19.07.2021
J utilise ce produit le matin dans du thé, ce dernier n altere en aucun cas le gout des aliments Concernant le bienfait de ce produit, j ai constaté une amélioration sensible de la digestion et de la régulation des troubles intestinaux Je recommande ce produit
17.06.2021
Les fibres ont amélioré ma digestion et le livre de recette est au top ! Je les commanderai certainement à nouveau ! :)
24.05.2021
prendre soin de son intestin !!!
20.05.2021
Produit complet, facile d'usage et à intégrer au quotidien ! Répond à mes attentes.
12.05.2021
All our customer reviews

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