The Multi

The Multi

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Essential for the proper functioning of the body, vitamins and minerals are not always present in sufficient quantities in Western diets*.

Multivitamins thus appear as the keystone of all health prevention strategies.

Rather than developing yet another catch-all formula, we focused on 27 key active ingredients adapted to all: bio-active vitamins, plant D3, high absorption minerals, plant extracts, CoQ10...

90 capsules • from 2/day

€22.90


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sans omg
whithout gmos
sans lactose
LACTOSE-free
sans gélatine
gelatin-free
sans gluten
Gluten-free
sans excipients
without Excipients*
100% vegan
100% Vegan
made in france
Made in France

*with no excipient suspects. We use an organic rice extract.

« The food pyramid must include daily intake of multivitamins. »

Walter Willett • Head of nutrition department – Harvard

«The food pyramid must include daily intake of multivitamins.»

Walter Willett • Head of nutrition department – Harvard

EFFECTIVENESS

27 essential assets

Our complex focuses on nutrients that are difficult to find in the diet. Our dosages are based on clinical studies that have demonstrated their health benefits. It contains 14 vitamins, 5 minerals, 4 carotenoids, 2 bio-flavonoids, coenzyme Q10, alpha-lipoic acid and is free of pro-oxidant minerals (iron, copper and manganese).

Natural and bio-active vitamins

No more artificial shapes! We have selected new so-called "ready-to-use" vitamins such as P'-5-P (B6), Quatrefolic® folates (B9), methylcobalamin (B12) or vitamins A, E and D3 in vegetable form.

A new magnesium salt!

For the first time a magnesium combining content AND absorption takes place in a multi-vitamin. It allows to reduce the number of capsules per day while maintaining a high efficiency.

BENEFITS

The benefits of multivitamins are numerous. It is known for its antioxidant virtues and acts on immunity as well as tonus.

Our formula is optimized: Pro-oxidant minerals have given way to a whole range of co-factors.
Liposomal magnesium is the only one to reconcile high content and high absorption.

We offer 1000 IU of vegetable vitamin D3 ! Vegetable vitamins A, D and E, folates, B6 co-enzyme, K2 MK7... but above all, a year of research to select the best.

Liposomal minerals combine both high content and high absportion.

USAGE ADVICES

When to take your Multivitamin ?

No matter the time of day, what matters is to take your capsules in the middle or at the end of a meal containing fat. You will then benefit from maximum absorption of fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K) and fatty acids !

How to take your capsules and tablets?

It's very simple, you have to take your capsules with a big glass of water.

How many capsules?

We recommend 3 capsules per day.

For personalized recommendations, please download our application. (To be used in addition to a healthy and balanced diet. People on anticoagulants should seek advice from their doctor.)

COMPOSITION

For 3 capsules

Vitamins

Vitamin A (from Dunaliela) : 800 μg (NRV* : 100%)
Vitamin B1 (Thiamine HCL) : 2,2 mg (NRV* : 200%)
Vitamine B2 (Riboflavine) : 2,8 mg (NRV* : 200%)
Vitamin B3 (Nicotinamide) : 16 mg (NRV* : 100%)
Vitamin B5 (Calcium panthothenate) : 6 mg (NRV* : 100%)
Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxal-5-phosphate) : 2 mg (VNR* : 143%)
Vitamin B7 (Inositol) : 30 mg
Vitamin B8 (Biotin) : 51 μg (NRV* : 100%)
Vitamin B9 (Quatrefolic®) : 200 μg (NRV* : 100%)
Vitamin B12 (Methylcobalamin) : 2,7 μg (NRV* : 100%)
Vitamin C (L-Ascorbic acid) : 80 mg (VNR* : 100%)
Vitamin D3 (Lichen Cholecalciferol) : 1000 UI (NRV* : 500%)
Vitamin E (Nutrabiol®) : 12 mg (NRV* : 100%)
Vitamin K2 (K2VITAL® DELTA) : 80 μg (NRV* : 107%)

Minerals

Magnesium element (UltraMag®) : 150 mg (NRV* : 40%)
Zinc element (Gluconate) : 10 mg (NRV* : 100%)
Selenium (Selenium yeast) : 30 μg (NRV* : 54%)
Iode (Rockweed extract) : 10 μg (NRV* : 6,7%)
Element chromium (Chromax®) : 25 μg (NRV* : 62%)

Co-factors

N-Acetyl-Cysteine : 180 mg
Alpha Lipoic Acid (form R) : 50 mg
Rutin (extract of S. japonica) : 32 mg
Hesperidin (citrus extract) : 32 mg
CoEnzyme Q10 : 30 mg
Quercetin (extract of S. japonica) : 20 mg
Montein (tagetes extract) : 7 mg
Lycopene (tomato extract) : 1 mg

Ingredients

Magnesium sucrosome, Capsule of vegetable origin HPMC, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, Alpha lipoic acid, Nu-RICE®, Zinc gluconate, Ascorbic acid, Dunaliela extract, Menaquinone-7, Rutin, Hesperidin, CoQ10, Inositol, d-alpha-tocopheryl acetate, Quercetine, Nicotinamide, Selenie yeast, Tagetes extract, Lichen cholecalciferol, Rockweed extract, Calcium pantothenate, Tomato extract, Pyridoxal-5-phosphate, Riboflavin, Thiamine HCL, (6S)-5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid, Methylcobalamin, Chromium piccolinate, Biotin.

*NRV : nutritional reference values

SCIENCE

Essential vitamins and micronutrients

Vitamins belong to the category of micronutrients (also including minerals and trace elements). The latter are components that derive mainly from our diet because they are not synthesized by our body. Micronutrients are required in small quantities for our vital development, the prevention of pathologies and our general well-being [1]. Every day, our organism needs vitamins for its physiological homeostasis, which are found in our diet. There are two categories of vitamins: water-soluble vitamins, i.e. soluble in water (group B and C vitamins), and fat-soluble vitamins, i.e. soluble in fat (vitamins A, D, E and K).

Food sources*

Foods richest in g of vitamins per 100 g of food

Water-soluble vitamins

Vitamins B1 (Thiamine)
Food yeast, grain bran, cereals, oilseeds, pork.

Vitamins B2 (Riboflavin)
Liver, giblets, eggs, some cheeses and mushrooms.

Vitamins B3 (Nicotinamide)
Bran from cereals, liver, fatty fish, poultry and other meats.

Vitamins B5 (Pantothenic acid)
Mushrooms, liver, eggs, abas, some poultry and cheese.

Vitamins B6 (Pyridoxine)
Dried aromatic herbs, cereal bran, poultry liver and giblets, oil seeds.

Vitamins B7 (Inositol) / Vitamins B8 (Biotin)
Liver, eggs, fish and meat, legumes, mushrooms, sprouted seeds.

Vitamins B9 (Folic Acid)
Liver, edible yeast, legumes, oilseeds, abas, spinach, dried aromatic herbs.

Vitamins B12 (Cobalamine)
Liver, abas, crustaceans, fatty fish and other fish.

Vitamins C (Ascorbic acid)
Raw foods: guava, blackcurrant, parsley, pepper, lemon, cabbage, kiwi, citrus.

Fat-soluble vitamins

Vitamins A (Retinol)
Dried aromatic herbs, liver, tuna, dried mushrooms.
Foods rich in provitamin A carotenoids (beta-carotene): carrots, sweet potato, spinach, squash.

Vitamins D (Calciferol)
Cod liver oil, cod liver, fatty fish, fish eggs and some margarines.

Vitamins E (Tocopherol)
Wheat germ oil and other vegetable oils, oil seeds.

Vitamin K (K1: Phylloquinone and K2: Menaquinone)
Vitamin K1: dried aromatic herbs, cabbage, spinach, salads.
Vitamin K2: liver, butter, poultry, yoghurt.

*The nutritional composition of foods is available for consultation. on the ANSES website, National Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health Safety.

Vitamin consumption

Vitamins do not all come from the same foods, so it is necessary to have a varied consumption (foods from different major food groups) but also a diversified diet (foods from the same food group). Micronutrients have no energy value (basically, they do not intervene directly on our energy balance, neither to lose weight nor to gain weight!) compared to macronutrients, which have a direct and significant impact (carbohydrates, lipids and proteins). The ESFA (European Food Safety Authority) has established Nutrient Reference Values (NRVs, formerly known as RDAs: Daily Reference Intakes) for the vitamins summarised below :

Vitamins and NRVs in adults, amount per day

Vitamins B1 (Thiamine)
0.1 mg / energy consumed
For individual at 2200 Kcak/d = 0.91 mg

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)
1.6 mg

Vitamin B3 (Nicotinamide)
1.6 mg / energy consumed
For individual at 2200 Kcal/d = 14.6 mg

Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic acid)
5 mg

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine)
1.7 mg (Men)
1.6 mg (Women)

Vitamin B8 (Biotin)
40 μg

Vitamin B9 (Folic acid)
330 μg
(in dietary folate*)

Vitamin B12 (Cobalamine)
4 μg

Vitamin C (Ascorbic acid)
110 mg (Men)
95 mg (Women)

Vitamin A (Retinol)
750 μg

Vitamin D (Calciferol)
15 μg (soit 600 UI)

Vitamin E (Tocopherol)
13 mg (Men)
90 mg (Women)

Vitamin K (Phylloquinone)
70 μg


*Dietary folate is less well assimilated than folic acid.

On the other hand, these NRVs, and therefore the needs, evolve according to particular physiological situations, particularly in pregnant or breastfeeding women and the elderly. During pregnancy, the need for vitamin B12 (increasing from 4 to 4.5 μg per day) and folates (increasing from 330 to 600 μg per day) is increased. During breastfeeding, the need for vitamin A (from 750 to 1300 μg per day) and vitamin C (from 95 to 155 mg per day) is also increased. These data suggest the importance of the pre-conceptional period, when optimal nutritional status would help to ensure "reserves" of micronutrients for the periods of pregnancy and breastfeeding, which are critical for the future health of the newborn. Finally, the elderly are more exposed to nutritional deficits due to a decrease and changes in micronutrient absorption [2] as well as changes in consumption (reduced appetite, pronounced dietary choices for foods loaded with flavour, etc.). There are other reasons that can generate deficiencies beyond the physiological status in which we find ourselves. Indeed, they can result from simply poor diets or from other types of factors such as absorption defects linked to intestinal pathologies or even to the taking of medication [3].

On the other hand, it is also less obvious to detect our consumption levels of micronutrients because they have varied and less known origins, making it more difficult to highlight a possible targeted "deficiency" ("I don't eat enough of this food so I don't consume enough of this vitamin").

A fundamental question then seems to arise: can we really claim an optimal consumption profile in our current food models ? Unfortunately, the food transitions we have faced and are still facing are extremely rapid and abrupt. We have moved from traditional consumption patterns characterized by high nutritional density to modern consumption patterns characterized by high energy density [4,5], which are real public health issues. More concretely, these changes have led to a decrease in the quality of our food (decrease in the consumption of essential micronutrients and fibre), particularly associated with the intensification of industrial processes (increase in the consumption of fat/sugar and industrial products; decrease in the quality of foods rich in essential micronutrients, particularly vitamins) [6]. In addition to these dietary parameters, lifestyles and environments constrain the attainment of certain vitamin requirements such as vitamin D (80% of vitamin D comes from photoconversion in the skin by UVB (sunlight) [7].

Finally, the problem is not essentially based on whether our diet is complete (balanced) or not. It is a question of accepting that the human species is a formidable adaptation machine, but that its corollary implies that we are never 100% adapted to a given biotope and therefore to 100% of our intake in the long term. Today, nutraceuticals offer the possibility of meeting or even exceeding these needs in order to ensure our well-being and health for the future.

Choose your Multivitamins: vitamins carefully selected at Nutri&Co

Here we give you some keys but above all some essential information to take the right direction in terms of multivitamins, because history repeats itself, there is a great diversity of products on the market. To benefit from the effects of vitamins, you need to be sure that they reach their targets, ideally in an active (= "ready-to-use") form. This is what defines the famous bioavailability, corresponding to the quality that a nutrient has to be able to be absorbed by the intestinal mucosa and to be used efficiently. Several criteria are taken into account to ensure the bioavailability of a compound and in particular its form (specific structure of the molecule). Indeed, some forms are said to be bioactive, i.e. they correspond to the form in which they can be used by the organism, which facilitates the work of assimilation of the latter [8].

How about a concrete example? Let's talk about vitamin B9 (folic acid from dietary folates). Within the Nutri&Co formula, vitamin B9 has been selected in the form of Quatrefolic. The latter corresponds to 5-Methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MTHF) which is a reduced form of folate. Supplementing this bioactive form also makes it possible to obtain a high bioavailability of vitamin B9 by "short-circuiting" the formation of intermediate molecules. In fact, when the body ingests "standard" folic acid, it must transform it 4 times before obtaining the active form such as Quatrefolic®. These successive transformations obviously generate losses, but also random efficacy, with a strong disparity between individuals [9].

The combination of bioactivity and bioavailability makes it possible to provide the Multivitamins with a bioidentical form of vitamin B9.

It is in this approach to effectiveness, and after more than a year of research, that Nutri&Co has systematically chosen vitamins in their bioactive form.

Vitamins, but also minerals and co-factors

In addition to vitamins, our formula also combines the presence of magnesium, trace elements (small-sized minerals) and co-factors that complement the action of supporting physiological reactions, while taking judicious care to eliminate potentially pro-oxidising or "antagonistic" minerals (iron and manganese in particular). Moreover, calcium has also not been included in our Multi, as the current scientific consensus highlights a sufficient dietary intake of calcium in the French population.

An example of a crucial trace element for our body is zinc. It is mainly found in red meats, certain seeds, shiitake mushrooms and shellfish. In moderate deficiencies, disturbances can be observed such as growth retardation, hypogonadism in young adolescents, healing defects, immune system response defects or neurosensory changes [10]. Three capsules of our multi provides 100% of the NRVs in a Gluconate form, perfectly well assimilated and usable by the body.

With regard to iodine, marine products are known to contain the highest concentration. Depending on their importance, possible deficiencies can have consequences at all ages, from the fetus to adulthood, ranging from developmental problems to neurological disorders. Coverage of iodine intake appears to be particularly important in the periconceptional period up to childhood [11]. Iodine supplementation is not systematic and yet iodine seems to have an important position in clinical practices related to specific nutritional recommendations in the periconceptional period [12].

Among the co-factors selected in the Multivitamins are :

  • Coenzyme Q10, a molecule produced by the organism involved in the processes of energy production and defence against oxidation of cell membranes,
  • Quercetin, a polyphenol that fights cellular aggression,
  • Lutein and lycopene, both from the family of carotenoids known for their antioxidant role,

This combination thus increases the antioxidant potential of our body [13] by molecules of various origins and normally poorly bioavailable.

Health benefits

Although vitamins and minerals act synergistically and through complex mechanisms, each has physiological roles that can be briefly listed (biological role tables). These major implications in our physiological balance give vitamins and minerals major axes of activity: vitality, tonus, immunity and antioxidant supply. During particular physiological situations such as pregnancy, meeting the needs for certain vitamins (especially vitamins B9 and D) and minerals (zinc and iodine) is crucial. Indeed, beyond the functions of maintaining our physiological balance, micronutrients also play a primordial role in periods of increased development.

Vitamins and biological roles

Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)
Supports energy metabolism (cofactor in the conversion of carbohydrates into energy), nerve and muscle functions.

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)
Supports energy metabolism (cofactor in the respiratory chain, coenzyme component), vision and skin.

Vitamin B3 (Nicotinamide)
Supports energy metabolism (cofactor in the respiratory chain), nerve function and improves lipid profiles and skin health.

Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic acid)
Supports energy metabolism.

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine)
Plays a role in the metabolism of amino acids (cofactor of about 100 enzymatic reactions) and fatty acids, red blood cell production, and heart health.

Vitamin B7 (Inositol) / Vitamin B8 (Biotin)
Plays a role in bone and hair health, in the conversion of nutrients to energy, and in the synthesis of lipids, amino acids and glycogen (the body's endogenous carbohydrate stores).

Vitamin B9 (Folic Acid)
Participates in DNA synthesis (genetic material), co-factors required for methylation reactions, and enables the formation of new cells and supports heart health.

Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)
Plays a role in heart health, production of new cells, hydrolysis of amino and fatty acids and supports nerve cell maintenance, interacts with vitamin B9 metabolism.

Vitamin C (Ascorbic acid)
Plays a role in the synthesis of new cells, in the hydrolysis of fatty acids and amino acids, supports the maintenance of nerve cells (synthesis of hormones and neurotransmitters), acts as an antioxidant, plays a role in the immune system, facilitates the absorption of non-heme iron (from plants), allows the recycling of vitamin E.

Vitamin A (Retinol)
Supports vision, skin and bones, immunity and reproduction, acts as an antioxidant.

Vitamin D (Calciferol)
Plays a role in bone metabolism (bone mineralization), maintains calcium and phosphorus levels in the blood to strengthen bones.

Vitamin E (Tocopherol)
Antioxidant regulating oxidation reactions, protects cell membranes and body compounds (lipids, enzymes...).

Vitamin K (K1 : Phylloquinone and K2 : Menaquinones)
Plays a role in the clotting of proteins in the blood and regulates blood calcium.

(Data from [14,15])

Minerals and biological roles

Magnesium
Find out more about the importance of magnesium in our physiological functions in the science section of our Magnesium.

Zinc
Involved in the structure and catalytic activity of many enzymes, plays a role in the function of the immune system, wound healing, protein synthesis, DNA synthesis and cell division, required in the perception of taste and odour, acts as an antioxidant.

Selenium
Plays a role in immune function, acts as an antioxidant.

Iodine
Plays a role as an essential constituent of thyroid hormones, involved in the general process of development and growth.

(Data from [16])

In conclusion, multivitamin supplementation very often raises the notion of "safety". Beyond the quality of the selected nutraceutical ingredients (origin, efficacy...), it is important to take into account the notion of "dose". We must not confuse NRVs (Nutritional Reference Values), which are thresholds below which we are potentially deficient (different NRVs between regulatory values for labelling and values defined by type of population), and MDIs (Maximum Daily Intakes) which represent the limits not to be exceeded in a supplement.

This is why our formula does not contain "supraphysiological" doses, which some people call "megadoses", thus respecting all French MDIs. It has been recognized that, at short and long-term physiological doses, taking multivitamins (of guaranteed quality!) does not present any danger and would even make it possible to limit the differences in micronutrients that grow over time, and potentially permanently, between our needs and what we consume [17]. Multivitamin supplementation could even be a preventive asset on the risk of the appearance and recurrence of cell degeneration in the long term [18].

Publications

  1. Shenkin, A. Micronutrients in health and disease. Postgrad. Med. J. 2006, 82, 559–567.
  2. Holt, P.R. Intestinal Malabsorption in the Elderly. Dig. Dis. 2007, 25, 144–150.
  3. Basu, T.K.; Donaldson, D. Intestinal absorption in health and disease: micronutrients. Best Pract. Res. Clin. Gastroenterol. 2003, 17, 957–979.
  4. Popkin, B.M. Nutrition Transition and the Global Diabetes Epidemic. Curr. Diab. Rep. 2015, 15, 64.
  5. Popkin, B.M. Relationship between shifts in food system dynamics and acceleration of the global nutrition transition. Nutr. Rev. 2017, 75, 73–82.
  6. FAO INFLUENCING FOOD ENVIRONMENTS FOR HEALTHY DIETS; 2016; p. 154;.
  7. Khammissa, R.A.G.; Fourie, J.; Motswaledi, M.H.; Ballyram, R.; Lemmer, J.; Feller, L. The Biological Activities of Vitamin D and Its Receptor in Relation to Calcium and Bone Homeostasis, Cancer, Immune and Cardiovascular Systems, Skin Biology, and Oral Health. BioMed Res. Int. 2018, 2018, 1–9.
  8. Rein, M.J.; Renouf, M.; Cruz-Hernandez, C.; Actis-Goretta, L.; Thakkar, S.K.; da Silva Pinto, M. Bioavailability of bioactive food compounds: a challenging journey to bioefficacy: Bioavailability of bioactive food compounds. Br. J. Clin. Pharmacol. 2013, 75, 588–602.
  9. Pietrzik, K.; Bailey, L.; Shane, B. Folic Acid and L-5-Methyltetrahydrofolate: Comparison of Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics. Clin. Pharmacokinet. 2010, 49, 535–548.
  10. Prasad, A.S. Discovery of Human Zinc Deficiency: Its Impact on Human Health and Disease. Adv. Nutr. 2013, 4, 176–190.
  11. Zimmermann, M.B. Iodine Deficiency. Endocr. Rev. 2009, 30, 376–408.
  12. FIGO Working Group on Good Clinical Practice in Maternal–Fetal Medicine; Di Renzo, G.C.; Fonseca, E.; Gratacos, E.; Hassan, S.; Kurtser, M.; Malone, F.; Nambiar, S.; Nicolaides, K.; Sierra, N.; et al. Good clinical practice advice: Micronutrients in the periconceptional period and pregnancy. Int. J. Gynecol. Obstet. 2019, 144, 317–321.
  13. Tan, B.L.; Norhaizan, M.E.; Liew, W.-P.-P.; Sulaiman Rahman, H. Antioxidant and Oxidative Stress: A Mutual Interplay in Age-Related Diseases. Front. Pharmacol. 2018, 9, 1162.
  14. Huskisson, E.; Maggini, S.; Ruf, M. The Role of Vitamins and Minerals in Energy Metabolism and Well-Being. J. Int. Med. Res. 2007, 35, 277–289.
  15. Gironés-Vilaplana, A.; Villaño, D.; Marhuenda, J.; Moreno, D.A.; García-Viguera, C. Vitamins. In Nutraceutical and Functional Food Components; Elsevier, 2017; pp. 159–201 ISBN 978-0-12-805257-0.
  16. Bhattacharya, P.T.; Misra, S.R.; Hussain, M. Nutritional Aspects of Essential Trace Elements in Oral Health and Disease: An Extensive Review. Scientifica 2016, 2016, 1–12.
  17. Biesalski, H.K.; Tinz, J. Multivitamin/mineral supplements: Rationale and safety – A systematic review. Nutrition 2017, 33, 76–82.
  18. Gaziano, J.M.; Sesso, H.D.; Christen, W.G.; Bubes, V.; Smith, J.P.; MacFadyen, J.; Schvartz, M.; Manson, J.E.; Glynn, R.J.; Buring, J.E. Multivitamins in the Prevention of Cancer in Men: The Physicians’ Health Study II Randomized Controlled Trial. JAMA 2012, 308, 1871.

ANALYSIS

One year of development

We undertook to develop our latest generation multivitamins in September 2017. It is by reviewing the entire scientific literature that we came across coenzyme forms of vitamins, liposomal magnesium, high absorption chromium or the synergistic effects of carotenoids and bio-flavonoids.

Security analysis (click on it)

On the tangible improvement of health over time thanks to multivitamins

On the high content and high absorption of UltraMag® (liposomal magnesium) 

On the high assimilation of Quatrefolic® (Vitamin B9) 

On alpha-lipoic acid as a key element in the synthesis of glutathione

EFFECTIVENESS
BENEFITS
USAGE ADVICES
COMPOSITION
SCIENCE
ANALYSIS

27 essential assets

Our complex focuses on nutrients that are difficult to find in the diet. Our dosages are based on clinical studies that have demonstrated their health benefits. It contains 14 vitamins, 5 minerals, 4 carotenoids, 2 bio-flavonoids, coenzyme Q10, alpha-lipoic acid and is free of pro-oxidant minerals (iron, copper and manganese).

Natural and bio-active vitamins

No more artificial shapes! We have selected new so-called "ready-to-use" vitamins such as P'-5-P (B6), Quatrefolic® folates (B9), methylcobalamin (B12) or vitamins A, E and D3 in vegetable form.

A new magnesium salt!

For the first time a magnesium combining content AND absorption takes place in a multi-vitamin. It allows to reduce the number of capsules per day while maintaining a high efficiency.

The benefits of multivitamins are numerous. It is known for its antioxidant virtues and acts on immunity as well as tonus.

Our formula is optimized : pro-oxidizing minerals have given way to a range of co-factors.

We propose 1000 IU of vegetable vitamin D3 !

Vegetable vitamins A, D and E, folates, B6 co-enzyme, K2 MK7.... but above all, one year of research to select the best.
Liposomal minerals combine high content and high absportion.

When to take your Multivitamin ?

No matter what time of day you take your capsules, what counts is to take them in the middle or at the end of a meal containing fat. You will then benefit from maximum absorption of fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E and K) and fatty acids !

How to take your capsules and tablets?

It's very simple, you have to take your capsules with a big glass of water.

How many capsules?

We recommend 3 capsules per day.

For personalized recommendations, please download our application. (To be used in addition to a healthy and balanced diet. People on anticoagulants should seek advice from their doctor.)

For 3 capsules
QuantityNRV* For 3 capsulesQuantité
   
VitaminsCo-factors
Vitamin A (from Dunaliela)
800 μg100%N-Acetyl-Cysteine180 mg
Vitamin B1 (Thiamine HCL)
2,2 mg200%Alpha Lipoic Acid (form R)50 mg
Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)
2,8 mg200%Rutin (extract of S. japonica)32 mg
Vitamin B3 (Nicotinamide)16 mg100%Hesperidin (citrus extract)32 mg
Vitamin B5 (Calcium pantothenate)
6 mg100%CoEnzyme Q1030 mg
Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxal-5-phosphate)
2 mg143%Quercetin (extract of S. japonica)20 mg
Vitamin B7 (Inositol)
30 mg-Montein (tagetes extract)7 mg
Vitamin B8 (Biotin)51 μg100%Lycopene (tomato extract)1 mg
Vitamin B9 (Quatrefolic®)200 μg100%
Vitamin B12 (Methylcobalamin)2,7 μg100%Autres ingrédients
Vitamin C ( L-Ascorbic acid)80 mg100%Magnesium sucrosome, Capsule of vegetable origin HPMC, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, Alpha lipoic acid, Nu-RICE®, Zinc gluconate, Ascorbic acid, Dunaliela extract, Menaquinone-7, Rutin, Hesperidin, CoQ10, Inositol, d-alpha-tocopheryl acetate, Quercetine, Nicotinamide, Selenie yeast, Tagetes extract, Lichen cholecalciferol, Rockweed extract, Calcium pantothenate, Tomato extract, Pyridoxal-5-phosphate, Riboflavin, Thiamine HCL, (6S)-5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid, Methylcobalamin, Chromium piccolinate, Biotin.
Vitamine D3 (Cholecalciferol de lichen)1000 UI
500%
Vitamin E (Nutrabiol®)12 mg100%
Vitamin K2 (K2VITAL® DELTA)80 μg107%
   
Minerals
Magnesium element (UltraMag®)
150 mg40%
Zinc element (Gluconate)10 mg100%
Selenium (Selenium yeast)30 μg54%
Iodine (Rockweed extract)10 μg6,7%
Element chromium (Chromax®)25 μg62%


*NRV : nutritional reference values

Vitamins, essential micronutrients
Vitamins belong to the category of micronutrients (also including minerals and trace elements). The latter are components that derive mainly from our diet because they are not synthesized by our body. Micronutrients are required in small quantities for our vital development, the prevention of pathologies and our general well-being [1]. Every day, our organism needs vitamins for its physiological homeostasis, which are found in our diet. There are two categories of vitamins: water-soluble vitamins, i.e. soluble in water (group B and C vitamins), and fat-soluble vitamins, i.e. soluble in fat (vitamins A, D, E and K).

Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic acid)Mushrooms, liver, eggs, abas, certain poultry and cheese

Vitamins

Food sources*
Foods richest in g of vitamin per 100 g of food
Hydrosoluble vitamins
Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)Food yeast, cereal bran, cereals, oilseeds, pork
Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)Liver, giblets, eggs, certain cheeses and mushrooms
Vitamin B3 (Nicotinamide)Sound of cereals, liver, fatty fish, poultry and other meats
Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine)Dried aromatic herbs, cereal bran, poultry liver and giblets, oilseeds
Vitamin B7 (Inositol)/Vitamin B8 (Biotin)Liver, eggs, fish and meat, legumes, mushrooms, sprouted seeds
Vitamin B9 (Folic acid)Liver, food yeast, legumes, oilseeds, germinated seeds, giblets, spinach, dried aromatic herbs
Vitamin B12 (Cobalamine)Liver, gut, shellfish, fatty fish and other fish
Vitamin C (Ascorbic acid)Raw food: guava, blackcurrant, parsley, pepper, lemon, cabbage, kiwi, citrus fruit
Fat-soluble vitamins
Vitamin A (Retinol)Dried aromatic herbs, liver, tuna, dried mushrooms
Foods rich in provitamin A carotenoids (beta-carotene): carrots, sweet potato, spinach, squash
Vitamin D (Calciferol)Cod liver oil, cod liver, fatty fish, fish eggs and some margarines
Vitamin E (Tocopherol)Wheat germ oil and other vegetable oils, oilseeds
Vitamin K (K1: Phylloquinone and K2: Menaquinone)Vitamin K1: dried aromatic herbs, cabbage, spinach, salads.
Vitamin K2: liver, butter, poultry, yoghurts


*The nutritional composition of foods can be consulted on the site of the ANSES, National Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health Safety.

Consumption of vitamins
Vitamins do not all come from the same foods, it is therefore necessary to have a varied consumption (foods from different major food groups) but also a diversified diet (foods from the same food group). Micronutrients have no energy value (basically, they do not intervene directly on our energy balance, neither to lose weight nor to gain weight!) compared to macronutrients, which have a direct and significant impact (carbohydrates, lipids and proteins). The ESFA (European Food Safety Authority) has established Nutrient Reference Values (NRVs, formerly known as RDAs: Daily Reference Intakes) for the vitamins summarised in the table below :

VitaminsAdult NRV
Quantity per day
Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)0,1 mg / consumed energy
For individual at 2200 Kcak/d = 0.91 mg
Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)1,6 mg
Vitamin B3 (Nicotinamide)1,6 mg / consumed energy
For individual at 2200 Kcak/d= 14.6 mg
Vitamie B5 (Pantothenic acid)5 mg
Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine)1.7 mg (Men)
1.6 mg (Women)
Vitamin B8 (Biotin)40 μg
Vitamin B9 (Folic Acid)330 μg
(in dietary folate*)
Vitamin B12 (Cobalamine)4 μg
Vitamin C (Ascorbic acid)110 mg (Men)
95 mg (Women)
Vitamin A (Retinol)750 μg
Vitamin D (Calciferol)15 μg (600 UI)
Vitamin E (Tocopherol)13 mg (Men)
90 mg (Women)
Vitamin K (Phylloquinone)70 μg


*Dietary folate is less well assimilated than folic acid.

On the other hand, these NRVs, and therefore the needs, evolve according to certain specific physiological situations, particularly in pregnant or breastfeeding women and the elderly. During pregnancy, the need for vitamin B12 (increasing from 4 to 4.5 μg per day) and folate (increasing from 330 to 600 μg per day) is increased. During breastfeeding, the need for vitamin A (from 750 to 1300 μg per day) and vitamin C (from 95 to 155 mg per day) is also increased. These data suggest the importance of the pre-conceptional period, when optimal nutritional status would help to ensure "reserves" of micronutrients for the periods of pregnancy and breastfeeding, which are critical for the future health of the newborn. Finally, the elderly are more exposed to nutritional deficits due to a decrease and changes in micronutrient absorption [2] as well as changes in consumption (reduced appetite, pronounced dietary choices for foods loaded with flavour, etc.). There are other reasons that can generate deficiencies beyond the physiological status in which we find ourselves. Indeed, they can result from simply poor diets or from other types of factors such as absorption defects linked to intestinal pathologies or even to the taking of medication [3].

On the other hand, it is also less obvious to detect our consumption levels of micronutrients because they have varied and less well known origins, making it more difficult to highlight a possible targeted "deficiency" ("I don't eat enough of this food so I don't consume enough of this vitamin").

A key question seems to be: can we really claim an optimal consumption profile in our current food models? Unfortunately, the food transitions we have faced and are still facing are extremely rapid and abrupt. We have moved from traditional consumption patterns characterized by high nutritional density to modern consumption patterns characterized by high energy density [4,5], which are real public health issues. More concretely, these changes have led to a decrease in the quality of our food (decrease in the consumption of essential micronutrients and fibre), particularly associated with the intensification of industrial processes (increase in the consumption of fat/sugar and industrial products; decrease in the quality of foods rich in essential micronutrients, particularly vitamins) [6]. In addition to these dietary parameters, lifestyles and environments constrain the attainment of certain vitamin requirements such as vitamin D (80% of vitamin D comes from photoconversion in the skin by UVB (sunlight) [7].

Finally, the problem is not essentially based on whether our diet is complete (balanced) or not. It is a question of accepting that the human species is a formidable adaptation machine, but that its corollary implies that we are never 100% adapted to a given biotope and therefore to 100% of our intake in the long term. Today, nutraceuticals offer the possibility to meet or even exceed these needs in order to ensure our well-being and health for the future.

Choosing your Multivitamins: carefully selected vitamins at Nutri&Co
Here we give you some keys but above all some essential information to take the right direction in terms of multivitamins, because history repeats itself, there is a wide variety of products on the market. To benefit from the effects of vitamins, you need to be sure that they reach their targets, ideally in an active (= "ready-to-use") form. This is what defines the famous bioavailability, corresponding to the quality that a nutrient has to be able to be absorbed by the intestinal mucosa and to be used efficiently. Several criteria are taken into account to ensure the bioavailability of a compound and in particular its form (specific structure of the molecule). Indeed, some forms are said to be bioactive, i.e. they correspond to the form in which they can be used by the organism, which facilitates the work of assimilation of the latter [8].

How about a concrete example? Let's talk about vitamin B9 (folic acid from dietary folates). Within the Nutri&Co formula, vitamin B9 has been selected in the form of Quatrefolic. The latter corresponds to 5-Methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MTHF) which is a reduced form of folate. Supplementing this bioactive form also makes it possible to obtain a high bioavailability of vitamin B9 by "short-circuiting" the formation of intermediate molecules. In fact, when the body ingests "standard" folic acid, it must transform it 4 times before obtaining the active form such as Quatrefolic®. These successive transformations obviously generate losses, but also random efficacy, with a strong disparity between individuals [9].

The combination of bioactivity and bioavailability makes it possible to provide the Multivitamins with a bioidentical form of vitamin B9.

It is in this approach to effectiveness, and after more than a year of research, that Nutri&Co has systematically chosen vitamins in their bioactive form. .

Vitamins, but also minerals and co-factors
In addition to vitamins, our formula also combines the presence of magnesium, trace elements (small-sized minerals) and co-factors that complement the action of supporting physiological reactions, while taking great care to eliminate potentially pro-oxidising or "antagonistic" minerals (iron and manganese in particular).Moreover, calcium has also not been included in our Multi, as the current scientific consensus highlights the sufficient dietary intake of calcium in the French population.

An example of a crucial trace element for our body is zinc. It is mainly found in red meats, certain seeds, shiitake mushrooms and shellfish. In moderate deficiencies, disturbances can be observed such as growth retardation, hypogonadism in young adolescents, healing defects, immune system response defects or neurosensory changes [10]. Three capsules of our multi provides 100% of the NRVs in a Gluconate form, perfectly well assimilated and usable by the body.

With regard to iodine, marine products are known to contain the highest concentration. Depending on their importance, possible deficiencies can have consequences at all ages, from the fetus to adulthood, ranging from developmental problems to neurological disorders. Coverage of iodine intake appears to be particularly important in the periconceptional period up to childhood [11]. Iodine supplementation is not systematic and yet iodine seems to have an important position in clinical practices related to specific nutritional recommendations in the periconceptional period [12].

Among the co-factors selected in the Multivitamin, we find in particular :

  • Coenzyme Q10, a molecule produced by the organism involved in the processes of energy production and defence against oxidation of cell membranes,
  • Quercetin, a polyphenol that fights cellular aggression,
  • Lutein and lycopene, both from the family of carotenoids known for their antioxidant role,

This combination therefore increases the antioxidant potential of our body [13] by molecules of various origins and normally poorly bioavailable.

Health benefits
Although vitamins and minerals act synergistically and via complex mechanisms, each has physiological roles that can be briefly listed (biological role tables). These major implications in our physiological balance give vitamins and minerals major axes of activity: vitality, tonus, immunity and antioxidant supply. During particular physiological situations such as pregnancy, meeting the needs for certain vitamins (especially vitamins B9 and D) and minerals (zinc and iodine) is crucial. Indeed, beyond the functions of maintaining our physiological balance, micronutrients also play a primordial role in periods of increased development.

VitaminsBiological roles
Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)Supports energy metabolism (cofactor in the conversion of carbohydrates to energy), nerve and muscle functions
Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)Supports energy metabolism (cofactor in the respiratory chain, component of coenzymes), vision and skin
Vitamin B3 (Nicotinamide)Supports energy metabolism (respiratory chain cofactor), nerve function and improves lipid profiles and skin health
Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic acid)Supports energy metabolism
Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine)Plays a role in the metabolism of amino acids (cofactor of about 100 enzyme reactions) and fatty acids, in red blood cell production, and heart health
Vitamin B7 (Inositol) / Vitamin B8 (Biotin)Plays a role in bone and hair health, in the conversion of nutrients to energy, and in the synthesis of lipids, amino acids and glycogen (endogenous carbohydrate reserves in the body)
Vitamin B9 (Folic acid)Participates in DNA synthesis (genetic material), cofactors required for methylation reactions, and allows the formation of new cells and supports heart health
Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)Plays a role in heart health, the production of new cells, in the hydrolysis of amino and fatty acids and supports the maintenance of nerve cells, interacts with the metabolism of vitamin B9
Vitamin C (Ascorbic acid)Plays a role in the synthesis of new cells, in the hydrolysis of fatty acids and amino acids, supports the maintenance of nerve cells (synthesis of hormones and neurotransmitters), acts as an antioxidant, plays a role in the immune system, facilitates the absorption of non-heme iron (from plants), allows the recycling of vitamin E
Vitamin A (Retinol)Supports vision, skin and bones, immunity and reproduction, acts as an antioxidant
Vitamin D (Calciferol)Plays a role in bone metabolism (bone mineralization), maintains calcium and phosphorus levels in the blood to strengthen bones
Vitamin E (Tocopherol)Antioxidant regulating oxidation reactions, protects cell membranes and body compounds (lipids, enzymes...)
Vitamin K (K1 : Phylloquinone and K2: Menaquinones)Play a role in the coagulation of proteins in the blood and regulates blood calcium

(Data from [14,15])

MineralsBiological roles
MagnesiumFind all the importance of magnesium in our physiological functions in the science section of ourMagnesium
ZincInvolved in the structure and catalytic activity of many enzymes, plays a role in the function of the immune system, wound healing, protein synthesis, DNA synthesis and cell division, required in the perception of taste and odour, acts as an antioxidant
SeleniumPlays a role in immune functions, acts as an antioxidant
IodinePlays a role as an essential constituent of thyroid hormones, involved in the general process of development and growth

(Data from [16])

In conclusion, multivitamin supplementation very often raises the notion of "safety". Beyond the quality of the selected nutraceutical ingredients (origin, efficacy...), it is important to take into account the notion of "dose". We must not confuse NRVs (Nutritional Reference Values), which are thresholds below which we are potentially deficient (different NRVs between regulatory values for labelling and values defined by type of population), and MDIs (Maximum Daily Intakes) which represent the limits not to be exceeded in a supplement.

This is why our formula does not contain "supraphysiological" doses, which some people call "megadoses", thus respecting all French MDIs. It has been recognized that, at short and long-term physiological doses, taking multivitamins (of guaranteed quality!) does not present any danger and would even make it possible to limit the differences in micronutrients that grow over time, and potentially permanently, between our needs and what we consume [17]. Multivitamin supplementation could even be an asset in preventing the risk of the appearance and recurrence of long-term cellular degeneration [18].

Publications

  1. Shenkin, A. Micronutrients in health and disease. Postgrad. Med. J. 2006, 82, 559–567.
  2. Holt, P.R. Intestinal Malabsorption in the Elderly. Dig. Dis. 2007, 25, 144–150.
  3. Basu, T.K.; Donaldson, D. Intestinal absorption in health and disease: micronutrients. Best Pract. Res. Clin. Gastroenterol. 2003, 17, 957–979.
  4. Popkin, B.M. Nutrition Transition and the Global Diabetes Epidemic. Curr. Diab. Rep. 2015, 15, 64.
  5. Popkin, B.M. Relationship between shifts in food system dynamics and acceleration of the global nutrition transition. Nutr. Rev. 2017, 75, 73–82.
  6. FAO INFLUENCING FOOD ENVIRONMENTS FOR HEALTHY DIETS; 2016; p. 154;.
  7. Khammissa, R.A.G.; Fourie, J.; Motswaledi, M.H.; Ballyram, R.; Lemmer, J.; Feller, L. The Biological Activities of Vitamin D and Its Receptor in Relation to Calcium and Bone Homeostasis, Cancer, Immune and Cardiovascular Systems, Skin Biology, and Oral Health. BioMed Res. Int. 2018, 2018, 1–9.
  8. Rein, M.J.; Renouf, M.; Cruz-Hernandez, C.; Actis-Goretta, L.; Thakkar, S.K.; da Silva Pinto, M. Bioavailability of bioactive food compounds: a challenging journey to bioefficacy: Bioavailability of bioactive food compounds. Br. J. Clin. Pharmacol. 2013, 75, 588–602.
  9. Pietrzik, K.; Bailey, L.; Shane, B. Folic Acid and L-5-Methyltetrahydrofolate: Comparison of Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics. Clin. Pharmacokinet. 2010, 49, 535–548.
  10. Prasad, A.S. Discovery of Human Zinc Deficiency: Its Impact on Human Health and Disease. Adv. Nutr. 2013, 4, 176–190.
  11. Zimmermann, M.B. Iodine Deficiency. Endocr. Rev. 2009, 30, 376–408.
  12. FIGO Working Group on Good Clinical Practice in Maternal–Fetal Medicine; Di Renzo, G.C.; Fonseca, E.; Gratacos, E.; Hassan, S.; Kurtser, M.; Malone, F.; Nambiar, S.; Nicolaides, K.; Sierra, N.; et al. Good clinical practice advice: Micronutrients in the periconceptional period and pregnancy. Int. J. Gynecol. Obstet. 2019, 144, 317–321.
  13. Tan, B.L.; Norhaizan, M.E.; Liew, W.-P.-P.; Sulaiman Rahman, H. Antioxidant and Oxidative Stress: A Mutual Interplay in Age-Related Diseases. Front. Pharmacol. 2018, 9, 1162.
  14. Huskisson, E.; Maggini, S.; Ruf, M. The Role of Vitamins and Minerals in Energy Metabolism and Well-Being. J. Int. Med. Res. 2007, 35, 277–289.
  15. Gironés-Vilaplana, A.; Villaño, D.; Marhuenda, J.; Moreno, D.A.; García-Viguera, C. Vitamins. In Nutraceutical and Functional Food Components; Elsevier, 2017; pp. 159–201 ISBN 978-0-12-805257-0.
  16. Bhattacharya, P.T.; Misra, S.R.; Hussain, M. Nutritional Aspects of Essential Trace Elements in Oral Health and Disease: An Extensive Review. Scientifica 2016, 2016, 1–12.
  17. Biesalski, H.K.; Tinz, J. Multivitamin/mineral supplements: Rationale and safety – A systematic review. Nutrition 2017, 33, 76–82.
  18. Gaziano, J.M.; Sesso, H.D.; Christen, W.G.; Bubes, V.; Smith, J.P.; MacFadyen, J.; Schvartz, M.; Manson, J.E.; Glynn, R.J.; Buring, J.E. Multivitamins in the Prevention of Cancer in Men: The Physicians’ Health Study II Randomized Controlled Trial. JAMA 2012, 308, 1871.

One year of developpement

We undertook to develop our latest generation multivitamins in September 2017. It is by reviewing the entire scientific literature that we came across coenzyme forms of vitamins, liposomal magnesium, high absorption chromium or the synergistic effects of carotenoids and bio-flavonoids.

Security analysis (click on it)

On the tangible improvement of health over time thanks to multivitamins

On the high content and high absorption of UltraMag® (liposomal magnesium) 

On the high assimilation of Quatrefolic® (Vitamin B9) 

On alpha-lipoic acid as a key element in the synthesis of glutathione

Where do our ingredients come from?

Capsule manufacturing

Montpellier, France
Laboratory Lustrel 

Magnesium - UltraMag®

Pisa, Italy
Laboratory Alesco

Vitamin K2 - VitaMK7®

Danemark
Kappa bio science lab

Natural Vitamin E - Nutrabiol®

Madrid, Spain
Laboratory BTSA

Vitamin B9 - Quatrefolic®

Milan, Italy
Gnosis Lab

Sélénium - Lynside®

Maisons Alfort, France
Lesaffre Lab

Capsule manufacturing

Montpellier, France
Laboratoire Lustrel

Vitamin K2 - VitaMK7®

Denmark
Kappa bio science lab

Magnesium - UltraMag®

Pisa, Italy
Laboratory Alesco

Natural Vitamin E - Nutrabiol®

Madrid, Spain
Laboratory BTSA

Vitamin B9-Quatrefolic®

Milan, Italy
Gnosis Lab

Chrome - Chromax®

New-York, USA
Laboratory Nutrition 21

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Questions - Answers

Why take a multivitamin and how long does a cure last?

The idea that "taking vitamins is useless when you eat a balanced diet" is still very widespread in France. However, several nationwide studies (SU.VI.MAX, etc.) have shown that micro-nutrient deficiencies affect the entire population, with special mention for pregnant women, adolescents and people over 50.It should also be noted that a recent and very serious study of unprecedented scope (more than 14,000 subjects)* has demonstrated an 8% reduction in the risk of cancer in people consuming a daily multivitamin for 11 years! Even if a one-time cure makes sense during the winter or during a period of gestation, long-term daily prevention remains the line that we defend at NUTRI & CO. 

* : Gaziano J, Sesso HD, Christen WG, et al Multivitamins in the Prevention of Cancer in Men: The Physicians' Health Study II Randomized Controlled Trial. JAMA. 

2012 ;():1-10. doi:10.1001/jama.2012.14641. 

What is a bio-active vitamin?

Most vitamins are not directly usable by the body and must be activated through various stages of processing. Some steps do not work properly and lead to an uncertain result. For example, this is the case of folic acid (synthetic B9), which the body has difficulty metabolising into B9 and whose excess could have an impact on health*. When administered in bioactive form, vitamins are such that the body uses them and can avoid hazardous transformation stages. 

* : Kim YI. Folate and carcinogenesis: Evidence, mechanisms and implications. J Nutr Biochem 1999;10:66-88. Medline

Is there a risk of overdose with your vitamins?

The fear of overdose arises from the mention "100% NRVs" found in the nutritional tables. Some neophytes are afraid of exceeding the limits by adding a multi-vitamin to their diet. However, we should not confuse NRVs (Nutrient Reference Values*), which are thresholds below which we are deficient, and MDIs (Maximum Daily Intakes), which represent the limits not to be exceeded in a supplement. To date, the EU has not yet determined a MDI for vitamins and minerals. They are therefore specific to each State. These French thresholds are defined in the decree of 9 May 2006. However, it should be noted that some of them have been cancelled (vitamins K, B1, B2, B5, B8 and B12) by the decision of the Conseil d'Etat of 27 April 2011. Our formula does not contain any "megadoses" and respects all the French DJMs. However, it should be noted that case law very often authorizes the exceeding of these thresholds. For example, this is the case for the following vitamins: 

- Vit D : 2000UI in jurisprudence vs. 1000UI in MDI

- Vit B9 : 400mcg vs. 200mcg (in particular following the arrival of folate such as Quatrefolic)

- Vit B6 : 4mg vs. 2mg (following the arrival of the co-enzyme form P'-5-P)

- Vit C : 250mg vs. 180mg. 

* : formerly RDA (Recommended Daily Allowance). 

Does your formula contain synthetic vitamins?

Most of the vitamins in our formula are in vegetable form (A, D, E, etc.), but we do not reject molecular chemistry when it brings a real plus. In reality, synthetic does not necessarily mean artificial. Some man-made vitamins are 100% bio-identical to their natural forms and therefore just as effective*. They therefore have advantages in terms of content and are free of extraction solvents.

* : it has been shown that natural and synthetic vitamin C have exactly the same level of absorption. Carr AC, Bozonet SM, Vissers MCM. A Randomized Cross-Over Pharmacokinetic Bioavailability Study of Synthetic versus Kiwifruit-Derived Vitamin C. Nutrients. 2013.

Why is calcium missing from your recipe?

There are two reasons for the absence of calcium in our formula:

- Contrary to popular belief, it is very rare to suffer from a calcium deficiency. This mineral is indeed found in abundance in our diet. Today, it is rather deficiencies in vitamins D and K, the two cofactors of calcium, that are rather pointed out when we encounter bone problems. 

- Calcium supplementation has not yet been proven effective and could even have a negative impact on the cardiovascular system.*

* : M. J. Bolland, A. Grey, A. Avenell, G. D. Gamble, I. R. Reid. Calcium supplements with and without vitamin D and risk of cardiovascular events: A reanalysis of the limited-access Women's Health Initiative dataset and meta-analysis. BMJ, 2011; 342 (Apr19 1)

Why is iron missing from your recipe?

The routine prescription of iron is not based on tangible clinical results. However, since the publication of an American study in 2011, iron supplementation is no longer universally accepted. This study involving more than 38,000 women showed a reduction in life expectancy in subjects who had taken the most iron supplements*. Experts point to the pro-oxidant effect of iron when it is present in too large quantities in the body.

* : Mursu J, Robien K, Harnack LJ, Park K, Jacobs DR Jr. Dietary supplements and mortality rate in older women: the Iowa Women's Health Study. Arch medical trainee. 2011 Oct 10;171(18):1625-33

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