Probio²

Probio²

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Probiotics benefits

Science continues to accumulate evidence of the benefits of probiotics. But despite more than 1000 known species, few strains have had their roles studied, and with the emergence of prebiotics, it's hard to know what they do...

While more and more formulas are being proposed, none have so far been able to combine patented probiotics AND prebiotics in the same gastro-resistant capsule with scientific evidence. That's why we did it !

60 capsules • from 1/day

€24.90


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sans ogm
WITHOUT GMOS
sans lactose
LACTOSE FREE
sans gélatine
GELATIN-FREE
sans gluten
GLUTEN-FREE
sans excipients
WITHOUT Excipients*
100% vegan
100% Vegan
made in france
Made in France

*with no excipient suspects. We use an organic rice extract.

We have long fought the microbial world.

Yet, it may well be our most valuable ally.

We have long fought the microbial world.

Yet, it may well be our most valuable ally.

EFFECTIVENESS

Combination of 9 probiotic strains, 3 of which are patented

The association of our 5 lactobacilli and 4 bifidobacteria has been thought to find a consensus between the "specific strain" and the "multi-strain" approach :

Each strain has a known human origin and precise identification.

First flavonoid with effective prebiotic action in capsule form

Until now, it was impossible to combine pro and prebiotics in the same formula, due to uncertain stability and unreasonable amounts (minimum 5 g of soluble dietary fibre to achieve efficacy, i.e. 7 gél/d).

But our discovery of a first ingredient with prebiotic potential as early as 500 mg and recognized as stable changes the deal! Thanks to this patented and 100% vegetable flavonoid, our formula is the first to guarantee a pre AND probiotic action in only 2 capsules per day.

CFCU: the guaranteed clinical dose first and foremost !

The maintenance of a certain number of CFUs throughout the life of the product is essential to guarantee its effectiveness. But more important than the overall number of CFUs, it is the specific number of CFUs per key strain that is important to preserve.

In order to guarantee efficacy throughout the product's lifespan, we have multiplied by 12.5 the quantity that has demonstrated the actions of our star strains in clinical studies. Thus, 60 billion CFU are contained in 2 capsules.

Gastro-resistant capsule Made In France

In addition to a selection of robust strains, our probiotics are protected by a patented delayed-release vegetal capsule made in Alsace: DRcaps®*. This capsule is the most documented in terms of its ability to deliver live bacteria to their site of action. The image proof just here<.

**DRCaps® is a trademark of LONZA (or one of its subsidiaries), registered in the EU.

BENEFITS

The benefits of probiotics are numerous. The benefits of probiotics are numerous.

According to the WHO definition, probiotics are living microorganisms which, when ingested in sufficient quantities, have beneficial effects on health.

Probiotics are particularly praised for their positive impact on the microbiota, compensating for imbalances such as dysbiosis.

Our probiotics are accompanied:

  • by vitamin D which contributes to the normal functioning of the immune system.
  • by riboflavin which contributes to the maintenance of normal mucous membranes.

USAGE ADVICES

When to take your Probiotics?

It doesn't matter what time of day it is, what matters most is to take your capsules at mealtimes! You will then benefit from a less acidic stomach PH which allows a better survival rate of bacteria.

How do you take your capsules and tablets?

It's very simple, you have to take your capsules with a big glass of water.

How many capsules?

We recommand 1 to 2 capsules per day.

For personalized recommendations, do not hesitate to download our application. (To be used in addition to a healthy and balanced diet. People on anticoagulants should seek advice from their doctor).

How to store probiotics ?

  • Store in a dry and dark place,
  • Avoid particularly humid areas such as the bathroom or refrigerator.

COMPOSITION

Pour 2 gélules

Probiotic Mix (corn starch): bw/>500 mg bw/>60 bn CFU*

  • Bifidobacterium lactis - SD-5859
    20 Billion CFU
  • Lactobacillus paracasei (Probi SelectTM) - DSM 13434
    12, 5 Billion CFU
  • Lactobacillus plantarum (Probi SelectTM) - DSM 6595
    12.5 Billion CFU
  • Lactobacillus rhamnosus (Probi SelectTM) - DSM 6594
    12, 5 bn CFU
  • Bifidobacterium bifidum 100B - SD-6576
    0.5 bn CFU
  • Bifidobacterium infantis - SD-6669
    0, 5 bn CFU
  • Bifidobacterium longum - SD-5844
    < 0.5 bn CFU
  • Lactobacillus acidophilus 200B - SD-5212
    < 0.5 bn CFU
  • Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei - SD-5842
    0.5 bn CFU

Microbiomex®
500 mg

  • of which orange extract
    470 mg
  • of which grapefruit extract
    30 mg
  • of which Hesperidin
    400 mg
  • of which Naringin
    25 mg

Plant Vitamin D
0.750 µg NRV** : 15%

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)
0.21 mg NRV**: 15%

Rice extract
9.32 mg

*CFCU: colony-forming unit
**NRV: nutritional reference values

SCIENCE

The microbiota: an organ in its own right

The digestive tract is inhabited by a colossal number of microorganisms: 10,000 to 100,000 billion bacteria, that's just a little more than the total number of cells in our body! [1]. This concentration of bacteria that cohabitates with our body is called the microbiota, which is increasingly considered an "organ" in its own right. These bacteria are mostly located in the intestine, especially the colon (the part of the intestine commonly known as the "large intestine"), which is populated by between 1 billion and 100 billion microorganisms. But they are also found throughout the gastrointestinal tract [2], in the mouth, on the lips, on the skin, in the nose, etc.

Throughout the digestive tract, the microbiota assists our body in the digestion and assimilation of micronutrients. One of its best known roles is the digestion of fibre, the consumption of which is highly recommended. These fibres have polysaccharide structures (sugar chains) of varying length and are digested by our intestinal flora.

  • Insoluble fibres found mainly in the rigid walls of vegetables and whole grains that remain in transit without being fermented, often causing digestive discomfort.

But what happens in our colon, the main site of our microbiota, during digestion? At this level come fibers but also residual nutrients (from proteins and sugars) that our microbiota will ferment and degrade. This fermentation produces various compounds of interest, called "bacterial metabolites", which will induce local effects in our colon. Among these compounds, we particularly distinguish the "short-chain fatty acids", three in number: acetate, butyrate and propionate [4]. At the colon level, short-chain fatty acids will serve as an energy source for colon cells [5], activate the specialization of key cells (cells that produce messengers for the body) [6] and control barrier function and permeability (inflammation control, defense of foreign microorganisms, etc.) [7].

These effects translate concretely into improved digestion, optimized metabolism, a sharper immune system, etc.

Finally, beyond the production of short-chain fatty acids through digestion, did you know that our microbiota plays an important role in the production of a variety of nutritional compounds? In fact, our intestinal bacteria participate in the production of vitamin K and certain B group vitamins such as B12 and B9 [8,9].

The microbiota: central player in our health

You've understood that a large part of our health is therefore played in our intestine. Beyond its digestive functions, our microbiota plays a key physiological role, as it has essential functions for our organism: barrier function and role in the immune system, metabolic and nervous regulation, etc. [2]. It is because of its different roles and because our microbiota is extremely adaptable (environment, diet, medication, etc.) that it is capable of playing a fundamental role in our health at various levels [10].

You'll understand, it's better to take care of your microbiota. The health of the latter depends on many parameters, from diet (THE major factor), to age, through your present and past environment [15]! Indeed, more and more research is linking the child's microbiota and the mother's diet to the environment/events during the perinatal period [16,17]. Yes, you may be right to ask yourself some questions about the origin of your microbiota !

Probiotics, what are they ?

You often hear about probiotics but without necessarily explaining what is behind the word. The World Health Organization (WHO) has defined probiotics as "living microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, provide beneficial health effects to the host" [18]. In nutraceuticals, probiotics are essentially proposed in the form of freeze-dried bacterial strains and the number of CFU - Colony Forming Unit - is often put forward as the unit of measurement that allows the quantity of viable bacteria present in the product to be counted.

If numerous scientific data on probiotics have demonstrated their positive impact on gastrointestinal health in response to various physiological disorders (transit, irritability of the colon, etc.), it is important to note that the number of CFU's in the product is not necessarily the same as the number of CFU's in the food supply. 19,20], there are still many areas to explore, such as the specific action strain by strain, their place of activity, their adhesion, their interactions and their mechanisms of action... One of the major prerequisites of a good probiotic is its ability to persist and act throughout the intestinal tract.

Let's say we are talking about the Dupont family. I know Mrs. Dupont from afar, and I tell myself that the Duponts probably all look alike and have the same talents. That's precisely the assumption we make when we work with generic strains. We know that members of the "Plantartum" family are generally very active in the gut, and we assume that if I take any "Plantarum" (randomly, the one available from my producer, the cheapest one), it will do the job as well as all the others. Basically, the promise of these products is: "it seems to work, but don't ask us how!"... And so much the worse for science.

Fortunately, better characterized and methodically studied products are starting to be solidly documented, like our 3 star strains. In other words, we're not talking about a Mr. or Mrs. Smith, we're talking about a particular member of the family, let's say Pierre Smith... whose height, age, hair color... His DNA is dissected in the smallest details, and above all, we know that he's the one you need, not his brother Paul, nor his cousin Martine. As you may have noticed, the number of probiotic formulas has increased exponentially in recent years. However, the quality of a formula remains difficult to evaluate and this is why many labels boast easy arguments, but not always true, such as the overbidding on CFU numbers, the multiplication of the number of strains or even storage in the refrigerator... All this without any clear rationale or credible explanations.

As a result, products are multiplying but the questions remain: which probiotics? What dosages for the best effectiveness? Which target population? What safety? The answers to these questions are also recommended criteria in the literature for choosing good probiotics [21].

Today, a significant gap is widening between products based on science and those based on preconceived ideas. If in doubt, take a look at the list of strains in your mix, and ask yourself these simple questions:

  • Where do the strains come from?
  • Have they been studied for a specific effect?

In fact, to understand how probiotic products are generally formulated, please visit our blog: Probiotics: swiss nutraceutical knife.

Flavonoids (polyphenols), compounds with prebiotic potential ?

As if the complexity of probiotics was insufficient, we will now move on to prebiotics. And let's start with the basics: what is a prebiotic? Prebiotics have been defined as non-viable components that have the ability to reach the colon and selectively stimulate (by fermentation) the growth and/or activity of one or more colonic bacteria [22]. Simply put, this is "good food" for the bacteria in your microbiota: the better they eat, the better they do, and in turn, the better you do!

A recent publication, however, has reported a broader definition that is beginning to gain consensus in the scientific community. It describes prebiotics as substrates ("usable" compounds) specifically used by colonic microorganisms in the host conferring a health benefit. Indeed, while it is established that prebiotics are often fibers (the best known, fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS), galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), inulin, psyllium ...), other compounds are now cited, such as polyphenols or polyunsaturated fatty acids, which may correspond to this more "modern" definition of prebiotics [23]. Why is this? Simply because they also stimulate the growth of colonic bacteria, even if they do so indirectly.

On the other hand, if compounds such as polyphenols seem to be able to interact efficiently and beneficially on the microbiota, their structure must be considered. Because although they show promising activity in test, on the other hand, they often fail in their ability to act "in real life" or in vivo. It should be noted that polyphenols are simply completely metabolized (the molecule is broken down by the body and evacuated) before they reach their place of action. These molecules are therefore very beneficial in the colon [24], provided that they can reach it...

A specific selection of certain polyphenols is necessary to guarantee their arrival in the colon [25]. Fortunately, nature does things well, since some polyphenols are naturally protected (dare we say vectorized!) and can reach the colon intact to be metabolized there and act. They are mainly found in citrus fruits (oranges, grapefruit, etc.): these are the famous flavonoids (hesperidin, for example).

Putting science back at the heart of product development

If a gap is growing between standard formulas and those that are in line with the latest scientific advances, then we clearly choose to be in the second category. Probio2 puts science back at the center of its design, by adhering to the latest advances in science, down to the last detail.

The association of our 5 lactobacilli and 4 bifidobacteria has been designed to bring together the best of the two philosophies:

  • Specific and targeted actions with 3 star strains with multiple studies. Judge for yourself: 21 clinical studies leading to the filing of 22 patents. Strains identified since the early 1990s, extensively studied and characterized.
  • 6 complementary strains for diversity. While targeted effects are gaining momentum, many studies continue to show the benefits of balanced mixes [26,27].

Focus on our 3 star strains

Lactobacillus plantarum 6595 (Probi : DSM 6595)

- Identity : dominant species within the genus Lactobacillus that colonize our digestive tract [28]
- Origin of strain: human intestinal mucosa
- Science: 9 clinical studies on a total of 743 subjects
- Patents: 11 patents to its credit
- Setback: subject of study since 1993 and safety status recognized by European authorities (QSP status)
- Strength: intestinal and digestive health

The beneficial effects of Lactobacillus plantarum 6595 on intestinal health result from its significant capacity to adhere to the cells of the intestinal tract [29,30]. In particular, this strain has shown effects on intestinal protection in weakened subjects: the famous barrier function of the intestine [31-34].

Lactobacillus rhamnosus 6594 (Probi: DSM 6594)

- Identity: species colonizing our digestive tract that can be associated with breastfeeding during childhood [35]
- Strain origin: human intestinal mucosa
- Science: 4 clinical studies on a total of 769 subjects
- Patents: 4 patents to its credit
- Step back : subject of study since 1993 and safety status recognized by European authorities (QSP status)
- Strength: intestinal barrier function

Lactobacillus rhamnosus 6594 has an intestinal adhesion capacity [29,36], and draws its strengths from its ability to act at the level of permeability and inflammatory response at the intestinal level. Lactobacillus rhamnosus is also the strain found in the majority of intestines of healthy newborns. It remains in the majority in the intestine during childhood and is useful throughout life [36,37].

Lactobacillus paracasei 13434 (Probi : DSM 13434)

- Identity : species of the Lactobacillus group mainly used in the food industry for the elaboration of our daily products [38]
- Origin of the strain : Human intestinal mucosa
- Science: 8 clinical studies on a total of more than 860 subjects
- Patents: 7 patents to its credit,
- Background: subject of study since 1998 and recognized safety status with the European authorities (QSP status),
- Strength: immune response

Having shown survival capacity in the intestinal tract [39,30], Lactobacillus paracasei 13434 is involved in the modulation of the immune response and in the efficacy of the response. In a clinical study, it showed an increase in immune defence activity (production of immune molecules) in subjects who received it orally for two weeks [40].

These strains show actions on intestinal health and disorders related to its deregulation. This combination offers an approach on the 3 axes of local functioning of the intestinal tract: barrier, immune and digestive functions.

A polyphenol with proven prebiotic potential

Polyphenols have been reported in the scientific literature as "functional food components that can influence our microbiota" [41]. But although they are capable of interacting with our microbiota in a beneficial way, their arrival in the colon is not always proven. We have therefore naturally turned to citrus flavonoids, which are naturally armed to survive and reach the colon intact.

Microbiomex® is a citrus extract (oranges and grapefruit) rich in flavonoids that has proven its action on the activity of the intestinal microbiota in in vivo and clinical studies, i.e. in real life. The glycosylated chemical form (associated with sugars) of the flavonoids contained in this extract, allows them to be protected in the digestive tract to be finally degraded (cleavage of the bond with sugars = deglycosylation) at the colonic level.

  • as a substrate for the microbiota (prebiotic action),
  • an effect on inflammation [43].

A meaningful Probio/ Prebio combination

As you will have understood, the decisive advantage here is that the beneficial effect on the microbiota (prebiotic) is obtained at a very low dosage compared to that of fibres (7g), prebiotics of another category. As a result, the Probiotic/Prebiotic mix fits in 2 small daily capsules (and not just any capsules, we will see later).

And as you follow perfectly, you logically wonder if the prebiotic does not represent a risk for the stability of the probiotics, since they are mixed in the same capsule. Well, we asked ourselves the same question, and the answer is "no", no stability risk for probiotics, we prove it to you by studies (science, always science).

Guaranteed effectiveness over time

First Guarantee: A "controlled" dosage

On the market, many probiotic formulas confuse the message and put forward a probiotic mix whose dosages are not very explicit. Very often, the diversity of strains takes precedence over their stability and resistance. As a result, you have the right to ask yourself what guarantees can be used to ensure that you will benefit from the promised effects?

<style="text-align: justify;">A mix of probiotics can undoubtedly only be used for a dosage combining a sufficient quantity of CFU (dose-response) and viability (dose-stability). The star strains we have selected have shown very good stability and survival through the gastrointestinal tract.

We have also multiplied by 12.5 the recommended dosage of our 3 star strains to ensure the recommended dose at the expiry date of the product. Indeed, it is very complex to follow the viability of the strains throughout the life of the product, which is why a dose of 12.5 billion per strain ensures that Probio2 provides at least the recommended dose.

Second guarantee: Encapsulation in DRcaps®*

DRcaps® (Capsugel) is a Made In France technology of HMPC capsule (vegetable hypromellosis, fibers) developed to effectively protect compounds sensitive to gastric acidity. Its effectiveness in terms of the release of compounds after passing through the stomach (acid medium) has been demonstrated by a simulation study of the human digestive tract [44] and also in clinical studies. These data showed that the complete dissolution of the capsule, and thus the release of the nutritional compounds present in the capsule, took place in the intestine (small intestine, just after the stomach).
**DRCaps® is a trademark of LONZA (or one of its subsidiaries), registered in the EU.

Third guarantee: production by worldwide specialists

Our desire to make the best probiotics on the market has necessarily led us to seek out the best specialists at the international level. Probi supplies us with probiotics. He is a world-renowned expert since the 1980s. The strains he produces himself have been studied since the 1990s and enjoy an unparalleled degree of hindsight, both in terms of effectiveness and stability.
- Our processor, who encapsulates these probiotics, also enjoys a worldwide reputation in the field. Nutrilinea perfectly controls the production of probiotic capsules, in particular by applying an exceptional level of control of Temperature and Humidity conditions :20/20 = "20°/20%". World record!

Publications

  1. Sender, R.; Fuchs, S.; Milo, R. Revised Estimates for the Number of Human and Bacteria Cells in the Body. PLOS Biol. 2016, 14, e1002533.
  2. Ursell, L.K.; Haiser, H.J.; Van Treuren, W.; Garg, N.; Reddivari, L.; Vanamala, J.; Dorrestein, P.C.; Turnbaugh, P.J.; Knight, R. The Intestinal Metabolome: An Intersection Between Microbiota and Host. Gastroenterology 2014, 146, 1470–1476.
  3. Dai, F.-J.; Chau, C.-F. Classification and regulatory perspectives of dietary fiber. J. Food Drug Anal. 2017, 25, 37–42.
  4. Rosenbaum, M.; Knight, R.; Leibel, R.L. The gut microbiota in human energy homeostasis and obesity. Trends Endocrinol. Metab. 2015, 26, 493–501.
  5. Tremaroli, V.; Bäckhed, F. Functional interactions between the gut microbiota and host metabolism. Nature 2012, 489, 242–249.
  6. Bauer, P.V.; Hamr, S.C.; Duca, F.A. Regulation of energy balance by a gut–brain axis and involvement of the gut microbiota. Cell. Mol. Life Sci. 2016, 73, 737–755.
  7. Canani, R.B. Potential beneficial effects of butyrate in intestinal and extraintestinal diseases. World J. Gastroenterol. 2011, 17, 1519.
  8. Rossi, M.; Amaretti, A.; Raimondi, S. Folate Production by Probiotic Bacteria. Nutrients 2011, 3, 118–134.
  9. Ramakrishna, B.S. Role of the gut microbiota in human nutrition and metabolism: Role of the gut microbiota. J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. 2013, 28, 9–17.
  10. Hills, R.D.; Pontefract, B.A.; Mishcon, H.R.; Black, C.A.; Sutton, S.C.; Theberge, C.R. Gut Microbiome: Profound Implications for Diet and Disease. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1613.
  11. Sekirov, I.; Russell, S.L.; Antunes, L.C.M.; Finlay, B.B. Gut Microbiota in Health and Disease. Physiol Rev 2010, 90, 46.
  12. Shanahan, F. The colonic microbiota in health and disease: Curr. Opin. Gastroenterol. 2013, 29, 49–54.
  13. van de Wouw, M.; Schellekens, H.; Dinan, T.G.; Cryan, J.F. Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis: Modulator of Host Metabolism and Appetite. J. Nutr. 2017, 147, 727–745.
  14. Cani, P.D. The gut microbiota manages host metabolism. Nat. Rev. Endocrinol. 2014, 10, 74–76.
  15. Power, S.E.; O’Toole, P.W.; Stanton, C.; Ross, R.P.; Fitzgerald, G.F. Intestinal microbiota, diet and health. Br. J. Nutr. 2014, 111, 387–402.
  16. Rautava, S.; Luoto, R.; Salminen, S.; Isolauri, E. Microbial contact during pregnancy, intestinal colonization and human disease. Nat. Rev. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. 2012, 9, 565–576.
  17. Sprockett, D.; Fukami, T.; Relman, D.A. Role of priority effects in the early-life assembly of the gut microbiota. Nat. Rev. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. 2018, 15, 197–205.
  18. Probiotics in food: health and nutritional properties and guidelines for evaluation; FAO, World Health Organization, Eds.; FAO food and nutrition paper; Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations : World Health Organization: Rome, 2006; ISBN 978-92-5-105513-7.
  19. Wilkins, T. Probiotics for Gastrointestinal Conditions: A Summary of the Evidence. 2017, 96, 10.
  20. Kechagia, M.; Basoulis, D.; Konstantopopoulou, S.; Dimitriadi, D.; Gyftopoulou, K.; Skarmoutsou, N.; Fakiri, E.M. Health Benefits of Probiotics : A Review. ISRN Nutr. 2012, 2013, 7.
  21. Sarao, L.K.; Arora, M. Probiotics, prebiotics, and microencapsulation: A review. Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr. 2017, 57, 344–371.
  22. Ziemer, C.J.; Gibson, G.R. An Overview of Probiotics, Prebiotics and Synbiotics in the Functional Food Concept: Perspectives and Future Strategies. Int. Dairy J. 1998, 8, 473–479.
  23. Gibson, G.R.; Hutkins, R.; Sanders, M.E.; Prescott, S.L.; Reimer, R.A.; Salminen, S.J.; Scott, K.; Stanton, C.; Swanson, K.S.; Cani, P.D.; et al. Expert consensus document: The International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) consensus statement on the definition and scope of prebiotics. Nat. Rev. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. 2017, 14, 491–502.
  24. Oteiza, P.I.; Fraga, C.G.; Mills, D.A.; Taft, D.H. Flavonoids and the gastrointestinal tract: Local and systemic effects. Mol. Aspects Med. 2018, 61, 41–49.
  25. Cardona, F.; Andrés-Lacueva, C.; Tulipani, S.; Tinahones, F.J.; Queipo-Ortuño, M.I. Benefits of polyphenols on gut microbiota and implications in human health. J. Nutr. Biochem. 2013, 24, 1415–1422.
  26. Chapman, C.M.C.; Gibson, G.R.; Rowland, I. Health benefits of probiotics: are mixtures more effective than single strains? Eur. J. Nutr. 2011, 50, 1–17.
  27. Ouwehand, A.C.; Invernici, M.M.; Furlaneto, F.A.C.; Messora, M.R. Effectiveness of Multi-strain Versus Single-strain Probiotics: Current Status and Recommendations for the Future. J. Clin. Gastroenterol. 2018, 52, S35–S40.
  28. Vries, M.C. de Analyzing global gene expression of Lactobacillus plantarum in the human gastrointestinal tract; Wageningen, 2006; ISBN 978-90-8504-344-7.
  29. Johansson, M.L.; Molin, G.; Jeppsson, B.; Nobaek, S.; Ahrné, S.; Bengmark, S. Administration of different Lactobacillus strains in fermented oatmeal soup: in vivo colonization of human intestinal mucosa and effect on the indigenous flora. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 1993, 59, 15–20.
  30. Berggren, A.; Lazou Ahrén, I.; Larsson, N.; Önning, G. Randomised, double-blind and placebo-controlled study using new probiotic lactobacilli for strengthening the body immune defence against viral infections. Eur. J. Nutr. 2011, 50, 203–210.
  31. Rayes, N.; Hansen, S.; Seehofer, D.; Müller, A.R.; Serke, S.; Bengmark, S.; Neuhaus, P. Early enteral supply of fiber and Lactobacilli versus conventional nutrition: a controlled trial in patients with major abdominal surgery. Nutrition 2002, 18, 609–615.
  32. Rayes, N.; Seehofer, D.; Hansen, S.; Boucsein, K.; M??ller, A.R.; Serke, S.; Bengmark, S.; Neuhaus, P. Early enteral supply of lactobacillus and fiber versus selective bowel decontamination: a controlled trial in liver transplant recipients: Transplantation 2002, 74, 123–128.
  33. OlaÂh, A.; BelaÂgyi, T.; Issekutz, A.; Gamal, M.E.; Bengmark, S. Randomized clinical trial of speci®c lactobacillus and ®bre supplement to early enteral nutrition in patients with acute pancreatitis. Br. J. Surg. 2002, 5.
  34. Klarin, B.; Molin, G.; Jeppsson, B.; Larsson, A. Use of the probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum 299 to reduce pathogenic bacteria in the oropharynx of intubated patients: a randomised controlled open pilot study. Crit. Care 2008, 12, R136.
  35. Kant, R.; Rintahaka, J.; Yu, X.; Sigvart-Mattila, P.; Paulin, L.; Mecklin, J.-P.; Saarela, M.; Palva, A.; von Ossowski, I. A Comparative Pan-Genome Perspective of Niche-Adaptable Cell-Surface Protein Phenotypes in Lactobacillus rhamnosus. PLoS ONE 2014, 9, e102762.
  36. Lazou Ahrén, I.; Berggren, A.; Teixeira, C.; Martinsson Niskanen, T.; Larsson, N. Evaluation of the efficacy of Lactobacillus plantarum HEAL9 and Lactobacillus paracasei 8700:2 on aspects of common cold infections in children attending day care: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study. Eur. J. Nutr. 2020, 59, 409–417.
  37. Pärtty, A.; Kalliomäki, M.; Endo, A.; Salminen, S.; Isolauri, E. Compositional Development of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus Microbiota Is Linked with Crying and Fussing in Early Infancy. PLoS ONE 2012, 7, e32495.
  38. Huys, G.; D’Haene, K.; Danielsen, M.; Mättö, J.; Egervärn, M.; Vandamme, P. Phenotypic and Molecular Assessment of Antimicrobial Resistance in Lactobacillus paracasei Strains of Food Origin. J. Food Prot. 2008, 71, 339–344.
  39. Antonsson, M. Lactobacillus strains isolated from Danbo cheese as adjunct cultures in a cheese model system. Int. J. Food Microbiol. 2003, 85, 159–169.
  40. Rask, C.; Adlerberth, I.; Berggren, A.; Ahrén, I.L.; Wold, A.E. Differential effect on cell-mediated immunity in human volunteers after intake of different lactobacilli: Lactobacilli and cell-mediated immunity. Clin. Exp. Immunol. 2013, 172, 321–332.
  41. Laparra, J.M.; Sanz, Y. Interactions of gut microbiota with functional food components and nutraceuticals. Pharmacol. Res. 2010, 61, 219–225.
  42. Salden, B.N.; Troost, F.J.; Possemiers, S.; Stevens, Y.; Masclee, A. Maastricht Univ. Maastricht NetherlandsUnpublished Work 2019.
  43. Stevens, Y.; Rymenant, E.V.; Grootaert, C.; Camp, J.V.; Possemiers, S.; Masclee, A.; Jonkers, D. The Intestinal Fate of Citrus Flavanones and Their Effects on Gastrointestinal Health. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1464.
  44. Marzorati, M.; Possemiers, S.; Verhelst, A.; Cadé, D.; Madit, N.; Van de Wiele, T. A novel hypromellose capsule, with acid resistance properties, permits the targeted delivery of acid-sensitive products to the intestine. LWT - Food Sci. Technol. 2015, 60, 544–551.
EFFECTIVENESS
BENEFITS
USAGE ADVICES
COMPOSITION
SCIENCE

Combination of 9 strains of which 3 patented

The association of our 5 lactobacilli and 4 bifidobacteria has been designed to find a consensus between the "specific strain" and the "multi-strain" approach:

  • Targeted actions with 3 star strains discovered in 1993 by our Swedish producer Probi. Their roles on the digestive and immune spheres have been studied in 21 clinical studies that have led to the filing of 22 patents.
  • 6 additional strains designed to bring diversity to our mix. While most of the work has focused on single strains, the different studies conducted in multi-strains show encouraging crossover effects.

Each strain has a known human origin and precise identification.

First flavonoid with effective prebiotic action in capsule form

Until now, it was impossible to combine pro and prebiotics in the same formula, due to uncertain stability and unreasonable amounts (minimum 5 g of soluble dietary fibre to achieve efficacy, i.e. 7 gél/d).

But our discovery of a first ingredient with prebiotic potential as early as 500 mg and recognized as stable changes the deal! Thanks to this patented and 100% vegetable flavonoid, our formula is the first to guarantee a pre AND probiotic action in only 2 capsules per day.

CFU: the guaranteed clinical dose above all !

The maintenance of a certain number of CFU throughout the life of the product is essential to guarantee its effectiveness. But more important than the overall number of CFUs, it is the specific number of CFUs per key strain that is important to preserve.

In order to guarantee efficacy throughout the product's lifespan, we have multiplied by 12.5 the quantity that has demonstrated the actions of our star strains in clinical studies. Thus, 60 billion CFU are contained in 2 capsules.

Gastro-resistant capsule Made In France

In addition to a selection of robust strains, our probiotics are protected by a patented delayed-release vegetal capsule made in Alsace: DRcaps®*. This capsule is the most documented in terms of its ability to deliver live bacteria to their site of action. The image proof just here<.

**DRCaps® is a trademark of LONZA (or one of its subsidiaries), registered in the EU.

The benefits of probiotics are numerous.

According to the WHO definition, probiotics are living microorganisms which, when ingested in sufficient quantities, have beneficial effects on health.

Our probiotics are accompanied:

  • by vitamin D which contributes to the normal functioning of the immune system.
  • by riboflavin which contributes to the maintenance of normal mucous membranes.

When do you take your probiotics?

It doesn't matter what time of day it is, what matters most is to take your capsules at mealtimes! You will then benefit from a less acidic stomach PH which allows a better survival rate of bacteria.

How do you take your capsules and tablets?

It's very simple, you have to take your capsules with a big glass of water.

How many capsules?

We recommand 1 to 2 capsules per day..

For personalized recommendations, do not hesitate to download our application. (To be used in addition to a healthy and balanced diet. People on anticoagulants should seek advice from their doctor).

Compound1 capsule2 capsules% des NRVs**

Probiotic Mix (cornstarch)
Bifidobacterium lactis - SD-5859
Lactobacillus paracasei (Probi SelectTM) - DSM 13434
Lactobacillus plantarum (Probi SelectTM) - DSM 6595
Lactobacillus rhamnosus (Probi SelectTM) - DSM 6594
Bifidobacterium bifidum 100B - SD-6576
Bifidobacterium infantis - SD-6669
Bifidobacterium longum - SD-5844
Lactobacillus acidophilus 200B - SD-5212
Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei - SD-5842

250 mg - 30 bn CFU*
10 bn CFU
6,25 bn CFU
6,25 bn CFU
6,25 bn CFU
0,25 bn CFU
0,25 bn CFU
0,25 bn CFU
0,25 bn CFU
0,25 bn CFU

500 mg - 60 bn CFU*
20 bn CFU
12,5 bn CFU
12,5 bn CFU
12,5 bn CFU
0,5 bn CFU
0,5 bn CFU
0,5 bn CFU
0,5 bn CFU
0,5 bn CFU

Microbiomex®
• of wich orange extract
• of wich grapefruit extract
• of which Hesperidin
• of which Naringin

250 mg
235 mg
15 mg
200 mg
12,5 mg

500 mg
470 mg
30 mg
400 mg
25 mg

Vegetable vitamin D0,325 µg0,750 µg15%
Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)0,105 mg0, 21 mg15%
Rice extract4,66 mg9,32 mg


*CFU : colony-forming unit
**NRV : nutritional reference values

The microbiota: an organ in its own right

The digestive tract is inhabited by a colossal number of microorganisms: 10,000 to 100,000 billion bacteria, that's just a little more than the total number of cells in our body! [1]. This concentration of bacteria that cohabitates with our body is called the microbiota, which is increasingly considered an "organ" in its own right. These bacteria are mostly located in the intestine, especially in the colon (the part of the intestine commonly known as the "large intestine"), which is populated by between 1 billion and 100 billion microorganisms. But they are also found throughout the gastrointestinal tract [2], in the mouth, on the lips, on the skin, in the nose, etc.

Throughout the digestive tract, the microbiota assists our bodies in the digestion and assimilation of micronutrients. One of its best known roles is the digestion of fibre, the consumption of which is highly recommended. These fibres have polysaccharide structures (sugar chains) of varying length and are digested by our intestinal flora.

All fibres are not equal and can be categorized simply according to their solubility [3] :

  • Insoluble fibres found mainly in the rigid walls of vegetables and whole grains that remain in transit without being fermented, often causing digestive discomfort.
  • Soluble fibre found in fruits, vegetables and legumes is the preferred food of our microbiota and stimulates their growth. Some of them are less recommended such as the famous fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) and inulin because they can cause bloating depending on the person.

But what happens in our colon, the main site of our microbiota, during digestion? At this level come fibers but also residual nutrients (from proteins and sugars) that our microbiota will ferment and degrade. This fermentation produces various compounds of interest, called "bacterial metabolites", which will induce local effects in our colon. Among these compounds, we particularly distinguish the "short-chain fatty acids", three in number: acetate, butyrate and propionate [4]. At the colon level, short-chain fatty acids will serve as an energy source for colon cells [5], activate the specialization of key cells (cells that produce messengers for the body) [6] and control barrier function and permeability (inflammation control, defense of foreign microorganisms, etc.) [7].

These effects translate into improved digestion, optimized metabolism, a sharper immune system, etc.

Finally, beyond the production of short-chain fatty acids through digestion, did you know that our microbiota plays an important role in the production of a variety of nutritional compounds? In fact, our intestinal bacteria participate in the production of vitamin K and certain B group vitamins such as B12 and B9 [8,9].

The microbiota: central player in our health

You've understood that a large part of our health is therefore played in our intestine. Beyond its digestive functions, our microbiota plays a key physiological role, as it has essential functions for our organism: barrier function and role in the immune system, metabolic and nervous regulation, etc. [2]. It is because of its different roles and because our microbiota is extremely adaptable (environment, diet, medication, etc.) that it is capable of playing a fundamental role in our health, and at various levels [10].

Today, scientists all agree that a "healthy", i.e. "symbiotic" microbiota contributes to the proper balance of our physiological functions beyond our digestive functions [11,12]. Conversely, the scientific literature has reported important relationships between an impoverished and disturbed microbiota (i.e. "dysbiosis") and a variety of health problems, ranging from digestive disorders to metabolic and nervous disorders [13,14].

You'll understand, it's better to take care of your microbiota. The health of the latter depends on many parameters, from diet (THE major factor), to age, through your present and past environment [15]! Indeed, more and more research is linking the child's microbiota and the mother's diet to the environment/events during the perinatal period [16,17]. Yes, you may not be wrong to ask yourself some questions about the origin of your microbiota !

Probiotics, what are they?

You often hear about probiotics, but without necessarily explaining what's behind the word. The World Health Organization (WHO) has defined probiotics as "living microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, provide beneficial health effects to the host" [18]. In nutraceuticals, probiotics are essentially proposed in the form of freeze-dried bacterial strains and the number of CFU - Colony Forming Unit - is often put forward as the unit of measurement that allows the quantity of viable bacteria present in the product to be counted.

If numerous scientific data on probiotics have demonstrated their positive impact on gastrointestinal health in response to various physiological disorders (transit, irritability of the colon, etc.)[19,20], it is important to note that the number of CFU's in the product is not necessarily the same as the number of CFU's in the food supply. One of the major prerequisites of a good probiotic is its ability to persist and act throughout the intestinal tract.

As a result, the majority of nutraceutical products present seemingly balanced and highly dosed mixes (often based on Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria) but actually hide a generic and simply profitable bacteria mix to produce, without any established scientific rationale. What is a generic bacterium? It is very simple. They are strains identified by their family name (for example Lactobacillus plantarum) without knowing exactly which family member we are talking about.

Let's say we are talking about the Dupont family. I know Mrs. Dupont from afar, and I tell myself that the Duponts probably all look alike and have the same talents. That's precisely the assumption we make when we work with generic strains. We know that members of the "Plantartum" family are generally very active in the gut, and we assume that if I take any "Plantarum" (randomly, the one available from my producer, the cheapest one), it will do the job as well as all the others. Basically, the promise of these products is: "it seems to work, but don't ask us how!"... And so much the worse for science.

Fortunately, better characterized and methodically studied products are beginning to be well documented, like our 3 star strains. In other words, we're not talking about a Mr. or Mrs. Smith, we're talking about a particular member of the family, let's say Pierre Smith... of whom we know absolutely everything: height, age, hair color... His DNA is dissected in the smallest details, and above all, we know that he's the one you need, not his brother Paul, nor his cousin Martine.

Not all probiotics are created equal. Not all probiotics are created equal. You may have noticed that in recent years, the number of probiotic formulas has increased exponentially. However, the quality of a formula remains difficult to evaluate and this is why many labels boast easy arguments, but not always true, such as the overbidding on CFU numbers, the multiplication of the number of strains or even storage in the refrigerator... All this without any clear rationale or credible explanations.

As a result, products are multiplying but the questions remain: which probiotics? What dosages for the best effectiveness? Which target population? What safety? The answers to these questions are also recommended criteria in the literature for choosing good probiotics [21].

Today, a significant gap is widening between products based on science and those based on received ideas. If in doubt, take a look at the list of strains in your mix, and ask yourself these simple questions:

  • Where do the strains come from?
  • Have they been studied for a specific effect?

In fact, to understand how probiotic products are generally formulated, please visit our blog: Probiotics: swiss nutraceutical knife.

Flavonoids (polyphenols), compounds with prebiotic potential ?

As if the complexity of probiotics was insufficient, we will now move on to prebiotics. And let's start with the basics: what is a prebiotic? Prebiotics have been defined as non-viable components that have the ability to reach the colon and selectively stimulate (by fermentation) the growth and/or activity of one or more colonic bacteria [22]. Simply put, this is "good food" for the bacteria in your microbiota: the better they eat, the better they do, and by immediate ricochet, the better you do !

A recent publication, however, has reported a broader definition that is beginning to gain consensus in the scientific community. It describes prebiotics as substrates ("usable" compounds) specifically used by colonic microorganisms in the host conferring a health benefit. Indeed, while it is established that prebiotics are often fibers (the best known, fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS), galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), inulin, psyllium ...), other compounds are now cited, such as polyphenols or polyunsaturated fatty acids, which may correspond to this more "modern" definition of prebiotics [23]. Why is this? Simply because they also stimulate the growth of colonic bacteria, even if they do so indirectly.

On the other hand, if compounds such as polyphenols seem to be able to interact efficiently and beneficially on the microbiota, their structure must be considered. For although they show promising activity in test tubes, however, they often fail in their ability to act "in real life" or in vivo. It should be noted that polyphenols are simply completely metabolized (the molecule is broken down by the body and evacuated) before they reach their place of action. These molecules are therefore very beneficial at the level of the colon [24], provided that they can get there...

A specific selection of certain polyphenols is necessary to ensure that they reach the colon [25]. Fortunately, nature does things well, since some polyphenols are naturally protected (dare we say vectorized!) and can reach the colon intact to be metabolized there and act. They are mainly found in citrus fruits (oranges, grapefruit, etc.): the famous flavonoids (hesperidin, for example).

Putting science back at the heart of product development

If a gap is growing between standard formulas and those that are in line with the latest scientific advances, then we clearly choose to be in the second category. Probio² puts science back at the centre of its design, by adhering to the latest advances in science, down to the smallest detail.

The combination of our 5 lactobacilli and 4 bifidobacteria has been designed to bring together the best of both philosophies:

  • Specific and targeted actions with 3 star strains with multiple studies. Judge for yourself: 21 clinical studies leading to the filing of 22 patents. Strains identified since the early 1990s, extensively studied and characterized.
  • 6 complementary strains for diversity. While targeted effects are gaining momentum, many studies continue to show the benefits of balanced mixes [26,27].

Close-up on our 3 star strains

Lactobacillus plantarum 6595 (Probi : DSM 6595)

- Identity : dominant species within the genus Lactobacillus that colonize our digestive tract [28]
- Origin of strain: human intestinal mucosa
- Science: 9 clinical studies on a total of 743 subjects
- Patents: 11 patents to its credit
- Setback: subject of study since 1993 and safety status recognized by European authorities (QSP status)
- Strength: intestinal and digestive health

The beneficial effects of Lactobacillus plantarum 6595 on intestinal health result from its significant capacity to adhere to the cells of the intestinal tract [29,30]. In particular, this strain has shown effects on intestinal protection in weakened subjects: the famous barrier function of the intestine [31-34].

Lactobacillus rhamnosus 6594 (Probi : DSM 6594)

- Identity : species colonizing our digestive tract that can be associated with breastfeeding during childhood [35]
- Origin of strain: human intestinal mucosa
- Science: 4 clinical studies on a total of 769 subjects
- Patents: 4 patents to its credit
- Setback: subject of study since 1993 and safety status recognized by the European authorities (QSP status)
- Strength: intestinal barrier function

Lactobacillus rhamnosus 6594 has an intestinal adhesion capacity [29,36], and draws its strengths from its ability to act at the level of permeability and inflammatory response at the intestinal level. Lactobacillus rhamnosus is also the strain found in the majority of intestines of healthy newborns. It remains in the majority in the intestine during childhood, and is useful throughout life [36,37].

Lactobacillus paracasei 13434 (Probi : DSM 13434)

- Identity : species of the Lactobacillus group mainly used in the food industry for the elaboration of our daily products [38]
- Origin of the strain: human intestinal mucosa
- Science: 8 clinical studies on a total of more than 860 subjects
- Patents: 7 patents to its credit,
- Setback: subject of study since 1998 and safety status recognized by the European authorities (QSP status),
- Strength: immune response

Shown to have a survival capacity in the intestinal tract [39,30], Lactobacillus paracasei 13434 is involved in the modulation of the immune response and in the efficacy of the response. In a clinical study, it showed an increase in immune defence activity (production of immune molecules) in subjects who received it orally for two weeks [40].

These strains show actions on intestinal health and disorders related to its deregulation. This combination offers an approach on the 3 axes of local functioning of the intestinal tract: barrier, immune and digestive functions.

A polyphenol with proven prebiotic potential

Polyphenols have been reported in the scientific literature as "functional food components that can influence our microbiota" [41]. But although they are able to interact with our microbiota in a beneficial way, their arrival in the colon is not always proven. We have therefore naturally turned to citrus flavonoids, which are naturally armed to survive and reach the colon intact.

Microbiomex® is a citrus extract (oranges and grapefruit) rich in flavonoids that has proven its action on the activity of the intestinal microbiota in in vivo and clinical studies, i.e. in real life. The glycosylated chemical form (associated with sugars) of the flavonoids contained in this extract, allows them to be protected in the digestive tract to be finally degraded (cleavage of the bond with sugars = deglycosylation) at the colonic level.

The results of the studies carried out on Microbiomex® have shown that it potentiates the production of short chain fatty acids suggesting a modulation of the activity of the microbiota as early as 500mg [42]. This 100% vegetable extract, standardised in hesperidin, is thus attributed a prebiotic action according to the most recent definitions.

Flavonoids act by two mechanisms:

  • as a substrate for the microbiota (prebiotic action),
  • an effect on inflammation [43].

A meaningful Probio/Prébio combination

As you will have understood, the decisive advantage here is that the beneficial effect on the microbiota (prebiotic) is obtained at a very low dosage compared to that of fibres (7g), prebiotics of another category. As a result, the Probiotic/Prebiotic mix fits in 2 small daily capsules (and not just any capsules, we will see later).

And as you follow perfectly, you logically wonder if the prebiotic does not represent a risk for the stability of the probiotics, since they are mixed in the same capsule. Well, we asked ourselves the same question, and the answer is "no", no stability risk for probiotics, we prove it to you by studies (science, always science).

Guaranteed effectiveness over time

First Guarantee: A "controlled" dosage

On the market, many probiotic formulas confuse the message and promote a probiotic mix whose dosages are not very explicit. Very often, the diversity of strains takes precedence over their stability and resistance. As a result, you have the right to ask yourself what guarantees can be used to ensure that you will benefit from the promised effects ?

A probiotic mix can only be used for a dosage that combines a sufficient quantity of CFU (dose-response) and viability (dose-stability). The star strains we have selected have shown very good stability and survival through the gastrointestinal tract.

We have also multiplied by 12.5 the recommended dosage of our 3 star strains to ensure the recommended dose at the expiry date of the product. Indeed, it is very complex to follow the viability of the strains throughout the life of the product, which is why a dose of 12.5 billion per strain ensures that Probio² provides at least the recommended dose.

Probiotic strainActive dose according to clinical studiesDose Nutri&Co
Quantity for 2 capsules at production
Guaranteed Dose
Amount for 2 capsules
at the end of the use-by date
Storage conditions, strain life cycle...
Lactobacillus plantarum
DSM 6595
Min. 1 x 109* CFU**

12.5 x 109 CFU

> 2 x 109 CFU

Lactobacillus rhamnosus
DSM 6594
Min. 1 x 109 CFU

12.5 x 109 CFU

> 2 x 109 CFU

Lactobacillus paracasei
DSM 13434
Min. 1 x 109 CFU

12.5 x 109 CFU

> 2 x 109 CFU

*109 : 1 billion
** CFU : Colony Forming Unit

Second guarantee: Encapsulation in DRcaps®*

DRcaps® (Capsugel) is a Made In France technology of HMPC (vegetable hypromellosis, fibers) capsules developed to effectively protect compounds sensitive to gastric acidity. Its effectiveness in terms of the release of compounds after passing through the stomach (acid medium) has been demonstrated by a simulation study of the human digestive tract [44] and also in clinical studies. These data showed that the complete dissolution of the capsule, and thus the release of the nutritional compounds present in the capsule, took place in the intestine (small intestine, just after the stomach).
*DRCaps® is a trademark of LONZA (or one of its subsidiaries), registered in the EU.

Third guarantee: production by world specialists

Our desire to produce the best probiotics on the market has inevitably led us to seek out the best specialists at international level.

- Probi supplies us with probiotics. He is a world-renowned expert since the 1980s. The strains he produces himself have been studied since the 1990s and enjoy an unparalleled degree of hindsight, both in terms of effectiveness and stability.
- Our processor, who encapsulates these probiotics, also enjoys a worldwide reputation in the field. Nutrilinea perfectly controls the production of probiotic capsules, in particular by applying an exceptional level of control of Temperature and Humidity conditions :20/20 = "20°/20%". World record !

Publications

  1. Sender, R.; Fuchs, S.; Milo, R. Revised Estimates for the Number of Human and Bacteria Cells in the Body. PLOS Biol. 2016, 14, e1002533.
  2. Ursell, L.K.; Haiser, H.J.; Van Treuren, W.; Garg, N.; Reddivari, L.; Vanamala, J.; Dorrestein, P.C.; Turnbaugh, P.J.; Knight, R. The Intestinal Metabolome: An Intersection Between Microbiota and Host. Gastroenterology 2014, 146, 1470–1476.
  3. Dai, F.-J.; Chau, C.-F. Classification and regulatory perspectives of dietary fiber. J. Food Drug Anal. 2017, 25, 37–42.
  4. Rosenbaum, M.; Knight, R.; Leibel, R.L. The gut microbiota in human energy homeostasis and obesity. Trends Endocrinol. Metab. 2015, 26, 493–501.
  5. Tremaroli, V.; Bäckhed, F. Functional interactions between the gut microbiota and host metabolism. Nature 2012, 489, 242–249.
  6. Bauer, P.V.; Hamr, S.C.; Duca, F.A. Regulation of energy balance by a gut–brain axis and involvement of the gut microbiota. Cell. Mol. Life Sci. 2016, 73, 737–755.
  7. Canani, R.B. Potential beneficial effects of butyrate in intestinal and extraintestinal diseases. World J. Gastroenterol. 2011, 17, 1519.
  8. Rossi, M.; Amaretti, A.; Raimondi, S. Folate Production by Probiotic Bacteria. Nutrients 2011, 3, 118–134.
  9. Ramakrishna, B.S. Role of the gut microbiota in human nutrition and metabolism: Role of the gut microbiota. J. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. 2013, 28, 9–17.
  10. Hills, R.D.; Pontefract, B.A.; Mishcon, H.R.; Black, C.A.; Sutton, S.C.; Theberge, C.R. Gut Microbiome: Profound Implications for Diet and Disease. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1613.
  11. Sekirov, I.; Russell, S.L.; Antunes, L.C.M.; Finlay, B.B. Gut Microbiota in Health and Disease. Physiol Rev 2010, 90, 46.
  12. Shanahan, F. The colonic microbiota in health and disease: Curr. Opin. Gastroenterol. 2013, 29, 49–54.
  13. van de Wouw, M.; Schellekens, H.; Dinan, T.G.; Cryan, J.F. Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis: Modulator of Host Metabolism and Appetite. J. Nutr. 2017, 147, 727–745.
  14. Cani, P.D. The gut microbiota manages host metabolism. Nat. Rev. Endocrinol. 2014, 10, 74–76.
  15. Power, S.E.; O’Toole, P.W.; Stanton, C.; Ross, R.P.; Fitzgerald, G.F. Intestinal microbiota, diet and health. Br. J. Nutr. 2014, 111, 387–402.
  16. Rautava, S.; Luoto, R.; Salminen, S.; Isolauri, E. Microbial contact during pregnancy, intestinal colonization and human disease. Nat. Rev. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. 2012, 9, 565–576.
  17. Sprockett, D.; Fukami, T.; Relman, D.A. Role of priority effects in the early-life assembly of the gut microbiota. Nat. Rev. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. 2018, 15, 197–205.
  18. Probiotics in food: health and nutritional properties and guidelines for evaluation; FAO, World Health Organization, Eds.; FAO food and nutrition paper; Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations : World Health Organization: Rome, 2006; ISBN 978-92-5-105513-7.
  19. Wilkins, T. Probiotics for Gastrointestinal Conditions: A Summary of the Evidence. 2017, 96, 10.
  20. Kechagia, M.; Basoulis, D.; Konstantopopoulou, S.; Dimitriadi, D.; Gyftopoulou, K.; Skarmoutsou, N.; Fakiri, E.M. Health Benefits of Probiotics : A Review. ISRN Nutr. 2012, 2013, 7.
  21. Sarao, L.K.; Arora, M. Probiotics, prebiotics, and microencapsulation: A review. Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr. 2017, 57, 344–371.
  22. Ziemer, C.J.; Gibson, G.R. An Overview of Probiotics, Prebiotics and Synbiotics in the Functional Food Concept: Perspectives and Future Strategies. Int. Dairy J. 1998, 8, 473–479.
  23. Gibson, G.R.; Hutkins, R.; Sanders, M.E.; Prescott, S.L.; Reimer, R.A.; Salminen, S.J.; Scott, K.; Stanton, C.; Swanson, K.S.; Cani, P.D.; et al. Expert consensus document: The International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) consensus statement on the definition and scope of prebiotics. Nat. Rev. Gastroenterol. Hepatol. 2017, 14, 491–502.
  24. Oteiza, P.I.; Fraga, C.G.; Mills, D.A.; Taft, D.H. Flavonoids and the gastrointestinal tract: Local and systemic effects. Mol. Aspects Med. 2018, 61, 41–49.
  25. Cardona, F.; Andrés-Lacueva, C.; Tulipani, S.; Tinahones, F.J.; Queipo-Ortuño, M.I. Benefits of polyphenols on gut microbiota and implications in human health. J. Nutr. Biochem. 2013, 24, 1415–1422.
  26. Chapman, C.M.C.; Gibson, G.R.; Rowland, I. Health benefits of probiotics: are mixtures more effective than single strains? Eur. J. Nutr. 2011, 50, 1–17.
  27. Ouwehand, A.C.; Invernici, M.M.; Furlaneto, F.A.C.; Messora, M.R. Effectiveness of Multi-strain Versus Single-strain Probiotics: Current Status and Recommendations for the Future. J. Clin. Gastroenterol. 2018, 52, S35–S40.
  28. Vries, M.C. de Analyzing global gene expression of Lactobacillus plantarum in the human gastrointestinal tract; Wageningen, 2006; ISBN 978-90-8504-344-7.
  29. Johansson, M.L.; Molin, G.; Jeppsson, B.; Nobaek, S.; Ahrné, S.; Bengmark, S. Administration of different Lactobacillus strains in fermented oatmeal soup: in vivo colonization of human intestinal mucosa and effect on the indigenous flora. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 1993, 59, 15–20.
  30. Berggren, A.; Lazou Ahrén, I.; Larsson, N.; Önning, G. Randomised, double-blind and placebo-controlled study using new probiotic lactobacilli for strengthening the body immune defence against viral infections. Eur. J. Nutr. 2011, 50, 203–210.
  31. Rayes, N.; Hansen, S.; Seehofer, D.; Müller, A.R.; Serke, S.; Bengmark, S.; Neuhaus, P. Early enteral supply of fiber and Lactobacilli versus conventional nutrition: a controlled trial in patients with major abdominal surgery. Nutrition 2002, 18, 609–615.
  32. Rayes, N.; Seehofer, D.; Hansen, S.; Boucsein, K.; Müller, A.R.; Serke, S.; Bengmark, S.; Neuhaus, P. Early enteral supply of lactobacillus and fiber versus selective bowel decontamination: a controlled trial in liver transplant recipients: Transplantation 2002, 74, 123–128.
  33. Oláh, A.; Belágyi, T.; Issekutz, A.; Gamal, M.E.; Bengmark, S. Randomized clinical trial of speci®c lactobacillus and ®bre supplement to early enteral nutrition in patients with acute pancreatitis. Br. J. Surg. 2002, 5.
  34. Klarin, B.; Molin, G.; Jeppsson, B.; Larsson, A. Use of the probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum 299 to reduce pathogenic bacteria in the oropharynx of intubated patients: a randomised controlled open pilot study. Crit. Care 2008, 12, R136.
  35. Kant, R.; Rintahaka, J.; Yu, X.; Sigvart-Mattila, P.; Paulin, L.; Mecklin, J.-P.; Saarela, M.; Palva, A.; von Ossowski, I. A Comparative Pan-Genome Perspective of Niche-Adaptable Cell-Surface Protein Phenotypes in Lactobacillus rhamnosus. PLoS ONE 2014, 9, e102762.
  36. Lazou Ahrén, I.; Berggren, A.; Teixeira, C.; Martinsson Niskanen, T.; Larsson, N. Evaluation of the efficacy of Lactobacillus plantarum HEAL9 and Lactobacillus paracasei 8700:2 on aspects of common cold infections in children attending day care: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study. Eur. J. Nutr. 2020, 59, 409–417.
  37. Pärtty, A.; Kalliomäki, M.; Endo, A.; Salminen, S.; Isolauri, E. Compositional Development of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus Microbiota Is Linked with Crying and Fussing in Early Infancy. PLoS ONE 2012, 7, e32495.
  38. Huys, G.; D’Haene, K.; Danielsen, M.; Mättö, J.; Egervärn, M.; Vandamme, P. Phenotypic and Molecular Assessment of Antimicrobial Resistance in Lactobacillus paracasei Strains of Food Origin. J. Food Prot. 2008, 71, 339–344.
  39. Antonsson, M. Lactobacillus strains isolated from Danbo cheese as adjunct cultures in a cheese model system. Int. J. Food Microbiol. 2003, 85, 159–169.
  40. Rask, C.; Adlerberth, I.; Berggren, A.; Ahrén, I.L.; Wold, A.E. Differential effect on cell-mediated immunity in human volunteers after intake of different lactobacilli: Lactobacilli and cell-mediated immunity. Clin. Exp. Immunol. 2013, 172, 321–332.
  41. Laparra, J.M.; Sanz, Y. Interactions of gut microbiota with functional food components and nutraceuticals. Pharmacol. Res. 2010, 61, 219–225.
  42. Salden, B.N.; Troost, F.J.; Possemiers, S.; Stevens, Y.; Masclee, A. Maastricht Univ. Maastricht NetherlandsUnpublished Work 2019.
  43. Stevens, Y.; Rymenant, E.V.; Grootaert, C.; Camp, J.V.; Possemiers, S.; Masclee, A.; Jonkers, D. The Intestinal Fate of Citrus Flavanones and Their Effects on Gastrointestinal Health. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1464.
  44. Marzorati, M.; Possemiers, S.; Verhelst, A.; Cadé, D.; Madit, N.; Van de Wiele, T. A novel hypromellose capsule, with acid resistance properties, permits the targeted delivery of acid-sensitive products to the intestine. LWT - Food Sci. Technol. 2015, 60, 544–551.

Where do our ingredients come from?

Probiotic strains - Probi

Location: Redmond, Washington,  USA - Research Center: Malmö, Sweden
A pioneer and reference in probiotic research, Probi has its own library of unique patented strains that they have been developing and studying since the group was founded in 1991.

Microbiomex®  - Bioactor

Research: Netherlands, Maastricht, Citrus growing area and production: Spain, Murcia.
Specializing in research on the benefits of citrus fruits, Bioactor has discovered several plant active ingredients with digestive virtues that have given rise to a patent: Microbiomex®.

DRCaps® capsule Lonza

Place of production: Colmar, France
Considered as the most qualitative capsule manufacturer in the world, LONZA has developed DRCaps® in France, specifically to protect probiotics from gastric acidity.

Capsule manufacturing - Nutrilinea

Place of manufacture: Milan, Italy
Nutrilinea is a global player known for its expertise in preserving the viability of probiotics, which requires absolute control of temperature and humidity conditions.

Probiotic strains - Probi

Location: Redmond, Washington, USA - Research Center: Malmö, Sweden
A pioneer and reference in probiotic research, Probi has its own library of unique patented strains that they have been developing and studying since the group was founded in 1991.

Microbiomex® - Bioactor

Research: The Netherlands, Maastricht, Citrus growing area and production: Spain, Murcia.
Specializing in research on the benefits of citrus fruits, Bioactor has discovered several plant active ingredients with digestive virtues that have given rise to a patent: Microbiomex®.

DRCaps® capsule Lonza

Place of production: Colmar, France
Considered as the most qualitative capsule manufacturer in the world, LONZA has developed DRCaps® in France, specifically to protect probiotics from gastric acidity.

Capsule manufacturing - Nutrilinea

Place of manufacture: Milan, Italy
Nutrilinea is a global player known for its expertise in preserving the viability of probiotics, which requires absolute control of temperature and humidity conditions.

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Questions - Answers

Should we keep our product in the fridge

The use of freeze-dried probiotics eliminates the need for a refrigerator. Unlike live bacteria, these strains are placed in a dormant state to freeze their development and prevent their death. This freeze-drying process thus guarantees good stability at room temperature. Once ingested, these bacteria awaken in contact with moisture to perform their beneficial roles.

Studies comparing the penetration and survival of freeze-dried and live bacteria once ingested showed no significant difference. Most of the research is therefore conducted using lyophilized strains.

In reality, the number one enemy of probiotics is not temperature, but humidity, which awakens the bacteria and thus accelerates their life cycle. For this reason, refrigerated storage is counter-productive as it causes moisture condensation in the bottle when it is opened. Therefore, avoid the fridge and particularly humid rooms such as bathrooms.

Are your strains of human origin?

The 3 "star" strains (Probi SelectTM) selected, as well as the other strains in our mix, are exclusively of human origin and present in the intestinal mucosa. They have been identified, selected, characterized and studied by our partner PROBI who also produces them.

How long does it take to get visible results?

It is important to understand that probiotic results are a function of the host microbiota. Everyone will react differently. However, two approaches can be distinguished :

- The curative approach (2 gél/d) in case of digestive ailments present and identified. It would be pretentious to give you the exact duration of this approach, as we have no idea how your microbiota will react. Some people experience immediate effects, while for others the results are expressed in one or two weeks.

- The anticipatory approach aims at a reinforced digestive and immune health. In this case it is advisable to take one capsule per day but continuously. A large American study has shown that such a preventive action can have a substantial impact on reducing healthcare costs.

It is also interesting to accompany the intake of probiotics with a diet rich in fibre (Low-FODMAPs) and rich in flavonoids.

Do probiotic strains sustainably colonize the microbiota?

By "colonize" we mean to colonize a probiotic strain that is capable of taking its place permanently within your microbiota. Although no one is able to say for sure, several studies suggest that probiotics only spend a few weeks playing the role of a temporal patch. To continue to benefit from the effects of a probiotic, it must therefore be taken over the long term.

Why did you re-formulate your first version?

At Nutri&Co, we prefer to improve existing formulas rather than multiply references. Our team is therefore constantly on the lookout for areas for improvement. On our probiotics, we had identified 3 of them:

  1. The addition of an effective prebiotic in a maximum of two capsules per day,
  2. The selection of patented strains supported by clinical studies in order to understand the usefulness of each bacterium and not of the mix in general,
  3. The use of a gastro-resistant capsule made in France, the famous DRCaps®, because it is better documented than its Asian counterparts.

Is Microbiomex® a natural product?

The Microbiomex® compound (standardized in flavonoids) is 100% of plant origin. It is a pure citrus extract (Grapefruit and Orange), without carrier or additives. Its origin is known and controlled, from the fields of cultivation in Spain to your capsules.

You've argued in the past that prebiotics aren't effective in small amounts.

Indeed, in the first version of our probiotics, we ruled out prebiotics because their effectiveness was only proven to be effective from 3g per day, i.e. a dose of 7 capsules of standard size. But science is advancing and to date, a new definition of prebiotics is emerging, suggesting that new compounds could be integrated into them, such as certain polyphenols like flavonoids. The latter would in fact be capable of exerting a prebiotic action by being effective in very small quantities (500mg) and this is precisely the case of Microbiomex®, which, icing on the cake, does not alter the stability of probiotics in any way. On the other hand, when we talk about flavonoids with prebiotic action, it is important to specify that the latter is not a substitute for fibres, whose prebiotic action is complementary.

In conclusion, it is now possible to couple probiotic and prebiotic actions in the same formula and guarantee its effectiveness.

In conclusion, it is now possible to couple probiotic and prebiotic actions in the same formula and guarantee its effectiveness.

Can bacteria increase immunity?

Probiotics influence our immunity in three ways:

  1. Some strains are able to inhibit pathogenic bacteria present in the intestine by producing lactic acid.
  2. More than 70% of our immune material is produced in the intestine. By adhering to the intestinal mucous membrane, the bacteria educate our immune system to distinguish our microbiota from possible intruders.
  3. Some strains help to protect the intestinal walls (which are real physical barriers) which is always beneficial to the immune system.

Should we choose the highest number of PDUs?

For marketers, the number of Colony Forming Units is a godsend because it brings back an element easily intelligible to the eyes of neophytes. However, while the number of CFUs gives us vague information on the overall load of the mix, it does not in any way guarantee the quality of a product.

What counts above all is to find at every moment of the product's life the quantity of key strains that have demonstrated efficacy in clinical studies.

Most key strains are operative from the billion CFUs and their overdosage in tens of billions is only to ensure the effectiveness of the mix after 24 months of conservation.

Are your patented strains GMO?

No, our strains are not GMO (Genetically Modified Organism) because they all come from human mucous membranes. In reality it is not their genetic material that is patented, but their specific clinical benefits. This is the case of our 3 star strains present in our mix :

- Lactobacillus plantarum (Probi: DSM 6595),
- Lactobacillus rhamnosus (Probi: DSM 6594),
- Lactobacillus paracasei (Probi: DSM 13434).

Are your probiotics ORGANIC?

Our probiotics are fermented like all micro-organisms and are of human origin. This means that the mother strain used to ferment our products was originally extracted from human mucous membranes. The BIO label is there to guarantee "Organic Agriculture". You can therefore easily understand that it makes no sense to label probiotics as "Organic Agriculture". Unless they are not of human origin...

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