The Collagen
The Collagen

Skin • Articulations

63 pods • from 2/day

Quantity :
Add to cart - €28.90
The Collagen

Skin • Articulations

63 pods • from 2/day

Collagen gives the skin and cartilage their structure and suppleness, but as adults, we lose 1% of this protein every year. Many of us turn to marine collagen to try to repel the visible signs of aging.

While many formulas exist, none have managed to combine clinically documented collagen peptides with a fruity taste, all without sweeteners or artificial flavors.

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EFFECTIVENESS

Skin Articulations Skin & Articulations

Collagen, the protein pillar of the body 

 Skin, cartilages, tendons, ligaments, connective tissues, etc. Collagen is everywhere. Type I, it ensures the firmness of the skin, while type II promotes the comfort of joint mechanics. Due to the effects of age, UV rays and sports, our collagen capital is shrinking by an average of 1% per year. Our collagen formula is designed to effectively compensate for some of these losses.

Clinically documented collagen types I and II

The effectiveness of a collagen formula depends above all on the size of peptides and the specific contribution of majority amino acids (mainly glycine). The hydrolysed forms of collagen make it possible to obtain small peptides more easily assimilated, which is why we selected complementary types I and II hydrolysates. Their dosages are based on clinical studies that have proven their effectiveness on elasticity, tone and texture of the skin.

100% natural, no taste of fish

Our high-grade peptides (purity and quality) offer perfect solubility and are formulated without additives, sugar or sweeteners. A subtle natural peach flavour allows our formula to be incorporated into your hot and cold preparations.

BENEFITS

The benefits of collagen are numerous

 Collagen is the majority structure protein of the body. As for the benefits, it provides a support function by contributing to the formation of connective tissues such as the dermis, the thickest layer of the skin, or cartilage, tissue of junction between the bones in the joints.

Collagen: 

  • Collagen improves the elasticity, tone and texture of the skin. It decreases the appearance of wrinkles and fine lines.

Vitamin C:

  • Vitamin C contributes to the normal formation of collagen to ensure the normal function of the skin, cartilages and bones.

HOW TO USE IT

When to take Collagen?

Collagen is to be taken in the morning for breakfast, lunch for lunch or dinner.

How many pods ?

  • Children: not recommended.
  • Adolescents: not recommended.
  • Adults: 2 pods (6 g) per day.
  • Pregnant and nursing women: 2 pods (6 g) per day.

How to take Collagen?

  • Nutri&Co Collagen is a dietary supplement to dilute. In a large glass, pour 200 ml of water, tea or your favorite drink. Add 2 pods (6 g) of Collagen. Mix until you obtain a homogeneous result.a

Duration of a take

To comply with the conditions of clinical studies, our Collagen is taken over long periods between 2 and 6 months

Duration of a packet

The bag of Collagen lasts 1 month at a rate of 2 pods per day.

Precautions for use

  • Dietary supplement based on marine collagen, vitamin C, to be used in addition to a healthy and balanced diet.
  • Do not exceed the recommended daily intakes.
  • Pregnant and nursing women should consult a doctor before any supplementation.
  • Allergens: Fish.

Storage conditions

  • Store in original packaging, in a dry place and away from heat and light.
  • Keep out of reach of children.

Need some recipe ideas?

Our RECIPE BOOK, offered for any purchase, allows you to integrate our Collagen in your beverage preparations.

INGREDIENTS

For 2 pods (6g)

  • HMG® Collagen: 2.5 g
  • Cartidyss® Collagen: 250 mg
  • Vitamin C: 12 mg - 30% of RI*

*RI: Recommended Intakes

Ingredients: Hydrolyzed marine collagen mix [HMG® (type I), Cartidyss® (type II) (fish)]; Filler: acacia gum; Natural peach flavour; Ascorbic acid (Vitamin C).

SCIENCE

Collagen: general aspects [1]

Collagen is a major structural protein of the body representing 1 3 of the body’s total proteins. If collagen is found mainly in soft tissues such as skin, solid tissues such as bones, and elastic tissues such as cartilage, it is ubiquitous in the body and there are no less than twenty different types. Mainly present in the skin, it is defined as a 'glue' protein since it contributes to the maintenance of the skin.

At the cellular level, it is found in the extracellular matrix, that is, between cells, as opposed to the “intracellular” matrix, or in cells.

Types and structure of collagen [1–3]

Among the twenty collagens that our body possesses, the two main and best known are type I and II collagens. They are found in different parts of the body:

  • For type I: skin, tendons, ligaments, fibrous cartilages, brain, organic bone components, skeletal muscle…
  • For type II: fibrous and elastic cartilages, cartilage zones of tendons, etc.

Structurally, any protein in the body consists of a specific assembly of amino acids. Being a protein, collagen also consists of amino acids whose organization forms what are called alpha chains.Alpha chains are mainly developed by the repetition of a tripeptide pattern (3 amino acids) starting with a particular amino acid, glycine (Gly): glycine - X - Y.

Among the amino acid sequences most represented in the alpha chains are:

  • The Gly-Pro-hyp sequence (where “Pro” is proline and “Hyp” is hydroxyproline), the most common sequence (about 12%),
  • Gly–Pro-Y and Gly–X–Hyp sequences, (X and Y being amino acids other than Gly-Pro-hyp) representing approximately 44%,
  • Gly–X–Y is the remaining 44%.

Types I and II are collagens organized into fibrils, we speak of collagen “fibrillary”. It is the most abundant collagen in the body. Only fibrillary collagen is found in the skin, bones and cartilage. In other tissues, fibrillary collagen is associated with non-fibrillary elements. The figure below shows an image of collagen fibres seen by electron microscopy.

Fibres de collagène
Collagen fibres seen by electron microscopy. Taken from [4]

The alpha chains of fibrillary collagen have similar amino acid sequences and are differentiated by specific sequences. Once assembled, the alpha chains are organized by winding and constitute triple helical molecules constituting the fibrils, themselves forming the collagen fibres. The figure below shows the organization of collagen fibres, from peptide assembly to fiber bundle:
Organisation des fibres de collagène
Gly: Glycine; Hyp: Hydroxyproline; Pro: Proline. From [5]

Whatever tissue it is found in, our body’s collagen has similar peptide sequences. The major difference between the twenty types of collagen present throughout our body is in the macromolecular assembly of the alpha chains that differs from tissue to tissue.

Collagen in the body

The skin [6]

The skin represents 16% of the human body, which is the largest organ in the human body. It is our first line of defence against the external environment. Three layers make up the skin:

  • The epidermis: in direct contact with the outside, it is very thin and ensures the barrier function of the skin.
  • The dermis: connective tissue of the skin, it is considerably thicker than the epidermis and extremely resistant thanks to its richness in type I collagen and elastin that give the skin its firmness and elasticity. It is the fibroblasts, specific cells of the dermis, that produce these major compounds of the dermis, including precisely the type I collagen.
  • The hypodermis: the deepest layer, it is rich in lipids (with its characteristic cells, the adipocytes) playing a nourishing and protective role (especially against the cold) and contains collagen to a lesser extent.

The figure below outlines the structure of the skin and the arrangement of collagen fibres within the dermis. One can thus easily visualize its function of structure and maintenance of the skin.
Structure schématisée de la peau

The joints [7]


Cartilage is a specialized connective tissue that covers both ends of the bones to form the joint. It plays a key role in ensuring the proper sliding between the bones and limiting the intensity of friction, ensuring cushioning and controlling joint pressure. Cartilage has specific cells, the chondrocytes, which synthesize its constituents such as collagen, the majority component. There are three types of cartilage: hyaline cartilage, elastic cartilage and fibrous cartilage. Hyaline cartilage is the most abundant, it is this one which is at the articular level and which is essentially made up of type II collagen.

The muscles [8]

Skeletal muscles (majority muscles, long before the heart muscle and smooth muscles) are composed of bundles of fibres themselves formed by myofibrils (i.e. fibrils having a contractile power). The muscles consist of the alternation of these fiber bundles with connective tissue mainly composed of collagen types I and III (other fibrillary collagen) and giving the muscle its elasticity and flexibility during contraction. This extracellular matrix containing collagen thus plays a protective role around the muscle.

Other key compounds in the extracellular matrix [9]

The dermis and cartilage are two connective tissues whose extracellular matrices are not only composed of collagen, but also of carbohydrate molecules, glycosaminoglycans, such as hyaluronic acid (or hyaluronane) for skin, and chondroitin sulfate for cartilage. Glycosaminoglycans are, for some, composed of glucosamine sulfate present in large quantities in the joints. Less abundant than collagen, glycosaminoglycans are however essential to maintain the dermis and cartilage by helping to retain water, and thus ensuring the hydration of the skin and joints.They are found in different proportions in the body: hyaluronic acid is more present in the dermis while chondroitin sulfate is more abundant in cartilage.

Collagen in the Course of Life [10–12]

During physiological aging, the decrease in collagen production leads to a weakening of the structure of the dermis, and consequently, of the skin. It is estimated that an adult loses an average of 1% dermal collagen per year. This natural aging process also affects motor function in bone and cartilage. Overall at 80, we would have lost 75% of our body collagen.

In addition, these collagen-rich tissues are particularly subject to external aggressions such as UV rays and pollution for the skin, or more or less intense physical activity for the joints (bones and cartilage).

The figure below presents a histological and schematic view of the evolution of the skin over time. Old skin, young skin, shows a low density of collagen in the dermis and sagging in the epidermis, revealing characteristic marks: wrinkles. These can be more or less visible. They are particularly favored by the photo-exposure of the skin over the course of life: the greater the exposure to UV, the more wrinkles become.

Comparaison peau jeune et peau âgée

Collagen hydrolysates [5–14]

So-called “native” collagen has a triple helix structure with a high molecular weight of around 300 kDa (kilodaltons). As with most proteins, ingesting it directly to compensate for the loss of our own collagen would be ineffective because, with this molecular weight, it is not assimilated by our body. In other words, native collagen does not have good bioavailability.

To overcome this problem, Nutra has developed so-called “hydrolyzed” forms, also called “collagen hydrolysates”. They are of porcine, bovine, avian and marine origin. This latter source is increasingly popular for health, cultural and industry traceability reasons.

The enzymatic hydrolysis of native collagen produces a set of small peptides (chains of amino acids), the weight of which can vary between 0.3 and 8 kDa, which is 40 to 1000 times smaller than that of native collagen. Thanks to their new form of reduced size, collagen hydrolysates (or collagen peptides) have better bioavailability to act in two potential modes of action:

  • Assimilated during digestion, they provide, in exogenous contributions, the constitutional “blocks” (glycine, hydroxyproline, proline) essential for the formation of collagen. Due to their small size, certain peptides such as tripeptides (formed by three amino acids) can pass the intestinal barrier without undergoing enzymatic hydrolysis. They then directly provide the constitutional blocks and ligands, and optimize the production of collagen.
  • By binding to receptors on fibroblast membranes, peptides stimulate the production of new endogenous collagen, but also other components of the skin such as elastin and hyaluronic acid.

In summary, hydrolyzed collagen is a highly digestible form of collagen, and it is readily absorbed by the human body. Its amino acids and peptides are distributed via the bloodstream to target tissues, such as the dermis and cartilage.

Ultimately, for an effective Nutraceutical supplementation with collagen, it is important to take into account the parameters of high bioavailability:

  • A contribution in the form of low molecular weight hydrolysates: the lower the peptides are, the more effective the collagen hydrolyzate would be,
  • An intake mainly composed of glycine then hydroxyproline-proline.

Clinical efficacy of collagen hydrolysates in Nutra

Collagen in hydrolyzed form has been widely studied: its tolerance and efficacy have been clinically demonstrated in several areas.

Collagen and skin
The appearance of the skin is a major beauty concern. Over time, its collagen capital decreases and signs of aging appear: wrinkles, sagging, loss of elasticity ... A 2019 review [15] identified different clinical studies that can be compared on hydrolyzed collagen supplementation and its impact on the skin. In this published work, 11 studies were selected, counting a total of 805 subjects. Collagen dosages varied between 2.5g and 10g per day over periods of 56 days (8 weeks) to 180 days (24 weeks). On average, the collagen hydrolysates used were 2 kDa. All the studies have shown significantly positive effects on various parameters linked to the aging of the skin: thickness of the dermis, wrinkles, elasticity… Through these studies, hydrolyzed collagen has therefore been shown to be effective (and safe) for improving the appearance of the skin. Supplementation with collagen hydrolysates therefore appears to be an asset in preventing skin aging and the appearance of signs of aging [16].

Collagen and Joints

Joint pain can affect many of us and affect certain more specific populations, such as athletes and the elderly. In these people, erosion of the cartilage caused by shock or the effect of time leads to osteoarthritis or arthritis. It is in fact within the framework of these issues that clinical studies are widely carried out. Compilations of results from clinical work highlight the significantly positive effects of taking hydrolyzed collagen to relieve joint pain (sensation and structure) [17,18]. These data are, however, and as always, to be considered in the clinical conditions in which they were observed. Most of these clinical studies have been performed at doses of 10g per day of collagen and type I peptides, and more recently at doses of 5g at a molecular weight of 3kDa [19,20]. Other studies have used doses of 1.2g of low molecular weight collagen peptides (<1kDa) [21–23]. The important parameter of these studies is the duration of collagen supplementation. Indeed, this work has revealed that significant positive effects appear with a duration of 24 weeks. Associated with the articular problem arises the question of the bone-collagen relationship. Improvement in bone mineralization through collagen supplementation is not yet sufficiently documented [24]. In contrast, a clinical study has shown promising effects in postmenopausal women (131 subjects). In these studies, supplementation with collagen peptides (5g per day) demonstrated better bone mineral density and improved bone plasma markers [25].

The Nutri&Co choice

After understanding the essential characteristics of good collagen, we have selected two high quality ingredients for our Collagen:

  • Collagen HMGTM: a type I collagen dosed at 5g / day, and with an average molecular weight consistent with the efficacy data in the literature on improving the appearance of the skin (firmness and wrinkles).
  • Cartydiss® Collagen: a type II collagen dosed at 0.5 g / day and clinically studied. The study carried out on 23 women aged 45 to 59 years taking 500 mg per day for 90 days demonstrated visible effects on:
    - reduction of wrinkles,
    - the increase in the density of the dermis,
    - improving the smooth appearance of the skin.

Our formula guarantees:

  • A combination of hydrolysates of types I and II collagen, the two most abundant fibrillar collagens in the body.
  • An aminogram of collagens rich in glycine (the majority), hydroxyproline and proline, the three main amino acids that make up collagen.
  • A broad spectrum of molecular weights, with a majority of low weights (see table below), for good assimilation and an interesting variety in proteins. Indeed, if collagens I and II provide relatively similar peptides, type II collagen allows a supply of specific constituents of the extracellular matrix of cartilage such as chondroitin sulfate (about 150 mg per day for a dose of our Collagen) and glucosamine (about 80 mg per day for a dose of our Collagen).
  • Impeccable traceability: our raw materials used come from controlled and committed fish by-product lines.
  • Convenience of use: the high quality of our collagens makes it possible to obtain a powder with good solubility, while a natural peach aroma provides a fine and delicate flavor. These organoleptic characteristics allow easy and daily use of our Marine Collagen in different types of hot or cold preparations and drinks.

Publications

  1. Sorushanova, A.; Delgado, L.M.; Wu, Z.; Shologu, N.; Kshirsagar, A.; Raghunath, R.; Mullen, A.M.; Bayon, Y.; Pandit, A.; Raghunath, M.; et al. The Collagen Suprafamily: From Biosynthesis to Advanced Biomaterial Development. Adv. Mater. 2019, 31, 1801651, doi:10.1002/adma.201801651.
  2. Mouw, J.K.; Ou, G.; Weaver, V.M. Extracellular Matrix Assembly: A Multiscale Deconstruction. Nat. Rev. Mol. Cell Biol. 2014, 15, 771–785, doi:10.1038/nrm3902.
  3. Arseni, L.; Lombardi, A.; Orioli, D. From Structure to Phenotype: Impact of Collagen Alterations on Human Health. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 1407, doi:10.3390/ijms19051407.
  4. Fligiel, S.E.G.; Varani, J.; Datta, S.C.; Kang, S.; Fisher, G.J.; Voorhees, J.J. Collagen Degradation in Aged/Photodamaged Skin In Vivo and After Exposure to Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 In Vitro. J. Invest. Dermatol. 2003, 120, 842–848, doi:10.1046/j.1523-1747.2003.12148.x.
  5. Sibilla, S.; Godfrey, M.; Brewer, S.; Budh-Raja, A.; Genovese, L. An Overview of the Beneficial Effects of Hydrolysed Collagen as a Nutraceutical on Skin Properties: Scientific Background and Clinical Studies. Open Nutraceuticals J. 2015, 8, 29–42, doi:10.2174/1876396001508010029.
  6. Haydont, V.; Bernard, B.A.; Fortunel, N.O. Age-Related Evolutions of the Dermis: Clinical Signs, Fibroblast and Extracellular Matrix Dynamics. Mech. Ageing Dev. 2019, 177, 150–156, doi:10.1016/j.mad.2018.03.006.
  7. Sophia Fox, A.J.; Bedi, A.; Rodeo, S.A. The Basic Science of Articular Cartilage: Structure, Composition, and Function. Sports Health Multidiscip. Approach 2009, 1, 461–468, doi:10.1177/1941738109350438.
  8. Csapo, R.; Gumpenberger, M.; Wessner, B. Skeletal Muscle Extracellular Matrix – What Do We Know About Its Composition, Regulation, and Physiological Roles? A Narrative Review. Front. Physiol. 2020, 11, 253, doi:10.3389/fphys.2020.00253.
  9. Gandhi, N.S.; Mancera, R.L. The Structure of Glycosaminoglycans and Their Interactions with Proteins. Chem. Biol. Drug Des. 2008, 72, 455–482, doi:10.1111/j.1747-0285.2008.00741.x.
  10. Shuster, S.; Black, M.M.; McVITIE, E. The Influence of Age and Sex on Skin Thickness, Skin Collagen and Density. Br. J. Dermatol. 1975, 93, 639–643, doi:10.1111/j.1365-2133.1975.tb05113.x.
  11. Shoulders, M.D.; Raines, R.T. Collagen Structure and Stability. Annu. Rev. Biochem. 2009, 78, 929–958, doi:10.1146/annurev.biochem.77.032207.120833.
  12. Varani, J.; Dame, M.K.; Rittie, L.; Fligiel, S.E.G.; Kang, S.; Fisher, G.J.; Voorhees, J.J. Decreased Collagen Production in Chronologically Aged Skin. Am. J. Pathol. 2006, 168, 1861–1868, doi:10.2353/ajpath.2006.051302.
  13. Naylor, E.C.; Watson, R.E.B.; Sherratt, M.J. Molecular Aspects of Skin Ageing. Maturitas 2011, 69, 249–256, doi:10.1016/j.maturitas.2011.04.011.
  14. León-López, A.; Morales-Peñaloza, A.; Martínez-Juárez, V.M.; Vargas-Torres, A.; Zeugolis, D.I.; Aguirre-Álvarez, G. Hydrolyzed Collagen—Sources and Applications. Molecules 2019, 24, 4031, doi:10.3390/molecules24224031.
  15. Choi, F.D.; Sung, C.T.; Juhasz, M.L.; Atanaskova Mesinkovska, N. Oral Collagen Supplementation:A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications. J. Drugs Dermatol. 2019, 18.
  16. Aguirre-Cruz, G.; León-López, A.; Cruz-Gómez, V.; Jiménez-Alvarado, R.; Aguirre-Álvarez, G. Collagen Hydrolysates for Skin Protection: Oral Administration and Topical Formulation. Antioxidants 2020, 9, 181, doi:10.3390/antiox9020181.
  17. Honvo, G.; Lengelé, L.; Charles, A.; Reginster, J.-Y.; Bruyère, O. Role of Collagen Derivatives in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Repair: A Systematic Scoping Review With Evidence Mapping. Rheumatol. Ther. 2020, 7, 703–740, doi:10.1007/s40744-020-00240-5.
  18. de Almagro, M.C. The Use of Collagen Hydrolysates and Native Collagen in Osteoarthritis. Am. J. Biomed. Sci. Res. 2020, 7, 530–532, doi:10.34297/AJBSR.2020.07.001217.
  19. Zdzieblik, D.; Oesser, S.; Gollhofer, A.; König, D. Improvement of Activity-Related Knee Joint Discomfort Following Supplementation of Specific Collagen Peptides. Appl. Physiol. Nutr. Metab. 2017, 42, 588–595, doi:10.1139/apnm-2016-0390.
  20. Zdzieblik, D.; Brame, J.; Oesser, S.; Gollhofer, A.; König, D. The Influence of Specific Bioactive Collagen Peptides on Knee Joint Discomfort in Young Physically Active Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Nutrients 2021, 13, 523, doi:10.3390/nu13020523.
  21. Feliciano, D.SL.; Gonzalez-Suarez, C.B.; Bernardo-Bueno, M.M.; Malvar, A.K.G.; Cua, R.C.A.; Tan-Sales, B.G.K.; Aycardo, S.M.O.; tan-Ong, M.; Chan, R.; De Los Reyes, F. Effect of Collagen Hydrolysate as Adjuvant Treatment to Excercise for Knee Osteoarthritis. PARM Proc. 2017, 9.
  22. Bruyère, O.; Zegels, B.; Leonori, L.; Rabenda, V.; Janssen, A.; Bourges, C.; Reginster, J.-Y. Effect of Collagen Hydrolysate in Articular Pain: A 6-Month Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled Study. Complement. Ther. Med. 2012, 20, 124–130, doi:10.1016/j.ctim.2011.12.007.
  23. Bernardo, M.L.R.; Azarcon, A.C. A Randomized Controlled Trial on the Effects of Oral Collagen Treatment on the Media) Knee Joint Space Aod Functional Outcome among Veterans Memorial Medical Center Patients Diagnosed with Osteoarthritis of the Knee. PARM Proc. 2012, 4, 9.
  24. Daneault, A.; Coxam, V.; Wittrant, Y. Biological Effect of Hydrolyzed Collagen on Bone Metabolism. Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr. 2015, 00–00, doi:10.1080/10408398.2015.1038377.
  25. König, D.; Oesser, S.; Scharla, S.; Zdzieblik, D.; Gollhofer, A. Specific Collagen Peptides Improve Bone Mineral Density and Bone Markers in Postmenopausal Women—A Randomized Controlled Study. Nutrients 2018, 10, 97, doi:10.3390/nu10010097.
EFFECTIVENESS
BENEFITS
HOW TO USE IT
INGREDIENTS
SCIENCE
Skin Articulations Skin & Articulations

Collagen, the protein pillar of the body
Skin, cartilages, tendons, ligaments, connective tissues, etc. Collagen is everywhere. Type I, it ensures the firmness of the skin, while type II promotes the comfort of joint mechanics. Due to the effects of age, UV rays and sports, our collagen capital is shrinking by an average of 1% per year. Our collagen formula is designed to effectively compensate for some of these losses.

Clinically documented collagen types I and II
The effectiveness of a collagen formula depends above all on the size of peptides and the specific contribution of majority amino acids (mainly glycine). The hydrolysed forms of collagen make it possible to obtain small peptides more easily assimilated, which is why we selected complementary types I and II hydrolysates. Their dosages are based on clinical studies that have proven their effectiveness on elasticity, tone and texture of the skin.

100% natural, no taste of fish
Our high-grade peptides (purity and quality) offer perfect solubility and are formulated without additives, sugar or sweeteners. A subtle natural peach flavour allows our formula to be incorporated into your hot and cold preparations.

The benefits of collagen are numerous

Collagen is the majority structure protein of the body. As for the benefits, it provides a support function by contributing to the formation of connective tissues such as the dermis, the thickest layer of the skin, or cartilage, tissue of junction between the bones in the joints.

Collagen: 

  • Collagen improves the elasticity, tone and texture of the skin. It decreases the appearance of wrinkles and fine lines.

Vitamin C:

  • Vitamin C contributes to the normal formation of collagen to ensure the normal function of the skin, cartilages and bones.

When to take Collagen?

Collagen is to be taken in the morning for breakfast, lunch for lunch or dinner.

How many pods ?

  • Children: not recommended.
  • Adolescents: not recommended.
  • Adults: 2 pods (6 g) per day.
  • Pregnant and nursing women: 2 pods (6 g) per day.

How to take Collagen?

  • Nutri&Co Collagen is a dietary supplement to dilute. In a large glass, pour 200 ml of water, tea or your favorite drink. Add 2 pods (6 g) of Collagen. Mix until you obtain a homogeneous result.a

Duration of a take

To comply with the conditions of clinical studies, our Collagen is taken over long periods between 2 and 6 months

Duration of a packet

The bag of Collagen lasts 1 month at a rate of 2 pods per day.

Precautions for use

  • Dietary supplement based on marine collagen, vitamin C, to be used in addition to a healthy and balanced diet.
  • Do not exceed the recommended daily intakes.
  • Pregnant and nursing women should consult a doctor before any supplementation.
  • Allergens: Fish.

Storage conditions

  • Store in original packaging, in a dry place and away from heat and light.
  • Keep out of reach of children.

Need some recipe ideas?

Our RECIPE BOOK, offered for any purchase, allows you to integrate our Collagen in your beverage preparations.

Nutritional valuesFor 3g= 1 podFor 6g= 2 pods

 % RI* for 2 pods

HMG® Collagen2,5 g5 mg-
Cartidyss® Collagen250 mg500 mg-
Vitamin C12 mg24 mg30 %

*Recommended intakes

Ingredients: Ingredients: Hydrolyzed marine collagen mix [HMG® (type I), Cartidyss® (type II) (fish)]; Filler: acacia gum; Natural peach flavour; Ascorbic acid (Vitamin C).

Collagen: general aspects [1]
Collagen is a major structural protein of the body representing 1 3 of the body’s total proteins. If collagen is found mainly in soft tissues such as skin, solid tissues such as bones, and elastic tissues such as cartilage, it is ubiquitous in the body and there are no less than twenty different types. Mainly present in the skin, it is defined as a 'glue' protein since it contributes to the maintenance of the skin.

At the cellular level, it is found in the extracellular matrix, that is, between cells, as opposed to the “intracellular” matrix, or in cells.

Types and structure of collagen [1–3]
Among the twenty collagens that our body possesses, the two main and best known are type I and II collagens. They are found in different parts of the body:

  • For type I: skin, tendons, ligaments, fibrous cartilages, brain, organic bone components, skeletal muscle…
  • For type II: fibrous and elastic cartilages, cartilage zones of tendons, etc.

Structurally, any protein in the body consists of a specific assembly of amino acids. Being a protein, collagen also consists of amino acids whose organization forms what are called alpha chains.Alpha chains are mainly developed by the repetition of a tripeptide pattern (3 amino acids) starting with a particular amino acid, glycine (Gly): glycine - X - Y.

Among the amino acid sequences most represented in the alpha chains are:

  • The Gly-Pro-hyp sequence (where “Pro” is proline and “Hyp” is hydroxyproline), the most common sequence (about 12%),
  • Gly–Pro-Y and Gly–X–Hyp sequences, (X and Y being amino acids other than Gly-Pro-hyp) representing approximately 44%,
  • Gly–X–Y is the remaining 44%.

Types I and II are collagens organized into fibrils, we speak of collagen “fibrillary”. It is the most abundant collagen in the body. Only fibrillary collagen is found in the skin, bones and cartilage. In other tissues, fibrillary collagen is associated with non-fibrillary elements. The figure below shows an image of collagen fibres seen by electron microscopy.

Fibres de collagène
Collagen fibres seen by electron microscopy. Taken from [4]

The alpha chains of fibrillary collagen have similar amino acid sequences and are differentiated by specific sequences. Once assembled, the alpha chains are organized by winding and constitute triple helical molecules constituting the fibrils, themselves forming the collagen fibres. The figure below shows the organization of collagen fibres, from peptide assembly to fiber bundle:
Organisation des fibres de collagène
Gly: Glycine; Hyp: Hydroxyproline; Pro: Proline. From [5]

Whatever tissue it is found in, our body’s collagen has similar peptide sequences. The major difference between the twenty types of collagen present throughout our body is in the macromolecular assembly of the alpha chains that differs from tissue to tissue.

Collagen in the body

The skin [6]

The skin represents 16% of the human body, which is the largest organ in the human body. It is our first line of defence against the external environment. Three layers make up the skin:

  • The epidermis: in direct contact with the outside, it is very thin and ensures the barrier function of the skin.
  • The dermis: connective tissue of the skin, it is considerably thicker than the epidermis and extremely resistant thanks to its richness in type I collagen and elastin that give the skin its firmness and elasticity. It is the fibroblasts, specific cells of the dermis, that produce these major compounds of the dermis, including precisely the type I collagen.
  • The hypodermis: the deepest layer, it is rich in lipids (with its characteristic cells, the adipocytes) playing a nourishing and protective role (especially against the cold) and contains collagen to a lesser extent.

The figure below outlines the structure of the skin and the arrangement of collagen fibres within the dermis. One can thus easily visualize its function of structure and maintenance of the skin.
Structure schématisée de la peau

The joints [7]


Cartilage is a specialized connective tissue that covers both ends of the bones to form the joint. It plays a key role in ensuring the proper sliding between the bones and limiting the intensity of friction, ensuring cushioning and controlling joint pressure. Cartilage has specific cells, the chondrocytes, which synthesize its constituents such as collagen, the majority component. There are three types of cartilage: hyaline cartilage, elastic cartilage and fibrous cartilage. Hyaline cartilage is the most abundant, it is this one which is at the articular level and which is essentially made up of type II collagen.

The muscles [8]

Skeletal muscles (majority muscles, long before the heart muscle and smooth muscles) are composed of bundles of fibres themselves formed by myofibrils (i.e. fibrils having a contractile power). The muscles consist of the alternation of these fiber bundles with connective tissue mainly composed of collagen types I and III (other fibrillary collagen) and giving the muscle its elasticity and flexibility during contraction. This extracellular matrix containing collagen thus plays a protective role around the muscle.

Other key compounds in the extracellular matrix [9]

The dermis and cartilage are two connective tissues whose extracellular matrices are not only composed of collagen, but also of carbohydrate molecules, glycosaminoglycans, such as hyaluronic acid (or hyaluronane) for skin, and chondroitin sulfate for cartilage. Glycosaminoglycans are, for some, composed of glucosamine sulfate present in large quantities in the joints. Less abundant than collagen, glycosaminoglycans are however essential to maintain the dermis and cartilage by helping to retain water, and thus ensuring the hydration of the skin and joints.They are found in different proportions in the body: hyaluronic acid is more present in the dermis while chondroitin sulfate is more abundant in cartilage.

Collagen in the Course of Life [10–12]
During physiological aging, the decrease in collagen production leads to a weakening of the structure of the dermis, and consequently, of the skin. It is estimated that an adult loses an average of 1% dermal collagen per year. This natural aging process also affects motor function in bone and cartilage. Overall at 80, we would have lost 75% of our body collagen.

In addition, these collagen-rich tissues are particularly subject to external aggressions such as UV rays and pollution for the skin, or more or less intense physical activity for the joints (bones and cartilage).

The figure below presents a histological and schematic view of the evolution of the skin over time. Old skin, young skin, shows a low density of collagen in the dermis and sagging in the epidermis, revealing characteristic marks: wrinkles. These can be more or less visible. They are particularly favored by the photo-exposure of the skin over the course of life: the greater the exposure to UV, the more wrinkles become.

Comparaison peau jeune et peau âgée

Collagen hydrolysates [5–14]
So-called “native” collagen has a triple helix structure with a high molecular weight of around 300 kDa (kilodaltons). As with most proteins, ingesting it directly to compensate for the loss of our own collagen would be ineffective because, with this molecular weight, it is not assimilated by our body. In other words, native collagen does not have good bioavailability.

To overcome this problem, Nutra has developed so-called “hydrolyzed” forms, also called “collagen hydrolysates”. They are of porcine, bovine, avian and marine origin. This latter source is increasingly popular for health, cultural and industry traceability reasons.

The enzymatic hydrolysis of native collagen produces a set of small peptides (chains of amino acids), the weight of which can vary between 0.3 and 8 kDa, which is 40 to 1000 times smaller than that of native collagen. Thanks to their new form of reduced size, collagen hydrolysates (or collagen peptides) have better bioavailability to act in two potential modes of action:

  • Assimilated during digestion, they provide, in exogenous contributions, the constitutional “blocks” (glycine, hydroxyproline, proline) essential for the formation of collagen. Due to their small size, certain peptides such as tripeptides (formed by three amino acids) can pass the intestinal barrier without undergoing enzymatic hydrolysis. They then directly provide the constitutional blocks and ligands, and optimize the production of collagen.
  • By binding to receptors on fibroblast membranes, peptides stimulate the production of new endogenous collagen, but also other components of the skin such as elastin and hyaluronic acid.

In summary, hydrolyzed collagen is a highly digestible form of collagen, and it is readily absorbed by the human body. Its amino acids and peptides are distributed via the bloodstream to target tissues, such as the dermis and cartilage.

Ultimately, for an effective Nutraceutical supplementation with collagen, it is important to take into account the parameters of high bioavailability:

  • A contribution in the form of low molecular weight hydrolysates: the lower the peptides are, the more effective the collagen hydrolyzate would be,
  • An intake mainly composed of glycine then hydroxyproline-proline.

Clinical efficacy of collagen hydrolysates in Nutra
Collagen in hydrolyzed form has been widely studied: its tolerance and efficacy have been clinically demonstrated in several areas.

Collagen and skin
The appearance of the skin is a major beauty concern. Over time, its collagen capital decreases and signs of aging appear: wrinkles, sagging, loss of elasticity ... A 2019 review [15] identified different clinical studies that can be compared on hydrolyzed collagen supplementation and its impact on the skin. In this published work, 11 studies were selected, counting a total of 805 subjects. Collagen dosages varied between 2.5g and 10g per day over periods of 56 days (8 weeks) to 180 days (24 weeks). On average, the collagen hydrolysates used were 2 kDa. All the studies have shown significantly positive effects on various parameters linked to the aging of the skin: thickness of the dermis, wrinkles, elasticity… Through these studies, hydrolyzed collagen has therefore been shown to be effective (and safe) for improving the appearance of the skin. Supplementation with collagen hydrolysates therefore appears to be an asset in preventing skin aging and the appearance of signs of aging [16].

Collagen and Joints

Joint pain can affect many of us and affect certain more specific populations, such as athletes and the elderly. In these people, erosion of the cartilage caused by shock or the effect of time leads to osteoarthritis or arthritis. It is in fact within the framework of these issues that clinical studies are widely carried out. Compilations of results from clinical work highlight the significantly positive effects of taking hydrolyzed collagen to relieve joint pain (sensation and structure) [17,18]. These data are, however, and as always, to be considered in the clinical conditions in which they were observed. Most of these clinical studies have been performed at doses of 10g per day of collagen and type I peptides, and more recently at doses of 5g at a molecular weight of 3kDa [19,20]. Other studies have used doses of 1.2g of low molecular weight collagen peptides (<1kDa) [21–23]. The important parameter of these studies is the duration of collagen supplementation. Indeed, this work has revealed that significant positive effects appear with a duration of 24 weeks. Associated with the articular problem arises the question of the bone-collagen relationship. Improvement in bone mineralization through collagen supplementation is not yet sufficiently documented [24]. In contrast, a clinical study has shown promising effects in postmenopausal women (131 subjects). In these studies, supplementation with collagen peptides (5g per day) demonstrated better bone mineral density and improved bone plasma markers [25].

The Nutri&Co choice
After understanding the essential characteristics of good collagen, we have selected two high quality ingredients for our Collagen:

  • Collagen HMGTM: a type I collagen dosed at 5g / day, and with an average molecular weight consistent with the efficacy data in the literature on improving the appearance of the skin (firmness and wrinkles).
  • Cartydiss® Collagen: a type II collagen dosed at 0.5 g / day and clinically studied. The study carried out on 23 women aged 45 to 59 years taking 500 mg per day for 90 days demonstrated visible effects on:
    - reduction of wrinkles,
    - the increase in the density of the dermis,
    - improving the smooth appearance of the skin.

Our formula guarantees:

  • A combination of hydrolysates of types I and II collagen, the two most abundant fibrillar collagens in the body.
  • An aminogram of collagens rich in glycine (the majority), hydroxyproline and proline, the three main amino acids that make up collagen.
  • A broad spectrum of molecular weights, with a majority of low weights (see table below), for good assimilation and an interesting variety in proteins. Indeed, if collagens I and II provide relatively similar peptides, type II collagen allows a supply of specific constituents of the extracellular matrix of cartilage such as chondroitin sulfate (about 150 mg per day for a dose of our Collagen) and glucosamine (about 80 mg per day for a dose of our Collagen).
  • Impeccable traceability: our raw materials used come from controlled and committed fish by-product lines.
  • Convenience of use: the high quality of our collagens makes it possible to obtain a powder with good solubility, while a natural peach aroma provides a fine and delicate flavor. These organoleptic characteristics allow easy and daily use of our Marine Collagen in different types of hot or cold preparations and drinks.

Publications

  1. Sorushanova, A.; Delgado, L.M.; Wu, Z.; Shologu, N.; Kshirsagar, A.; Raghunath, R.; Mullen, A.M.; Bayon, Y.; Pandit, A.; Raghunath, M.; et al. The Collagen Suprafamily: From Biosynthesis to Advanced Biomaterial Development. Adv. Mater. 2019, 31, 1801651, doi:10.1002/adma.201801651.
  2. Mouw, J.K.; Ou, G.; Weaver, V.M. Extracellular Matrix Assembly: A Multiscale Deconstruction. Nat. Rev. Mol. Cell Biol. 2014, 15, 771–785, doi:10.1038/nrm3902.
  3. Arseni, L.; Lombardi, A.; Orioli, D. From Structure to Phenotype: Impact of Collagen Alterations on Human Health. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 1407, doi:10.3390/ijms19051407.
  4. Fligiel, S.E.G.; Varani, J.; Datta, S.C.; Kang, S.; Fisher, G.J.; Voorhees, J.J. Collagen Degradation in Aged/Photodamaged Skin In Vivo and After Exposure to Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 In Vitro. J. Invest. Dermatol. 2003, 120, 842–848, doi:10.1046/j.1523-1747.2003.12148.x.
  5. Sibilla, S.; Godfrey, M.; Brewer, S.; Budh-Raja, A.; Genovese, L. An Overview of the Beneficial Effects of Hydrolysed Collagen as a Nutraceutical on Skin Properties: Scientific Background and Clinical Studies. Open Nutraceuticals J. 2015, 8, 29–42, doi:10.2174/1876396001508010029.
  6. Haydont, V.; Bernard, B.A.; Fortunel, N.O. Age-Related Evolutions of the Dermis: Clinical Signs, Fibroblast and Extracellular Matrix Dynamics. Mech. Ageing Dev. 2019, 177, 150–156, doi:10.1016/j.mad.2018.03.006.
  7. Sophia Fox, A.J.; Bedi, A.; Rodeo, S.A. The Basic Science of Articular Cartilage: Structure, Composition, and Function. Sports Health Multidiscip. Approach 2009, 1, 461–468, doi:10.1177/1941738109350438.
  8. Csapo, R.; Gumpenberger, M.; Wessner, B. Skeletal Muscle Extracellular Matrix – What Do We Know About Its Composition, Regulation, and Physiological Roles? A Narrative Review. Front. Physiol. 2020, 11, 253, doi:10.3389/fphys.2020.00253.
  9. Gandhi, N.S.; Mancera, R.L. The Structure of Glycosaminoglycans and Their Interactions with Proteins. Chem. Biol. Drug Des. 2008, 72, 455–482, doi:10.1111/j.1747-0285.2008.00741.x.
  10. Shuster, S.; Black, M.M.; McVITIE, E. The Influence of Age and Sex on Skin Thickness, Skin Collagen and Density. Br. J. Dermatol. 1975, 93, 639–643, doi:10.1111/j.1365-2133.1975.tb05113.x.
  11. Shoulders, M.D.; Raines, R.T. Collagen Structure and Stability. Annu. Rev. Biochem. 2009, 78, 929–958, doi:10.1146/annurev.biochem.77.032207.120833.
  12. Varani, J.; Dame, M.K.; Rittie, L.; Fligiel, S.E.G.; Kang, S.; Fisher, G.J.; Voorhees, J.J. Decreased Collagen Production in Chronologically Aged Skin. Am. J. Pathol. 2006, 168, 1861–1868, doi:10.2353/ajpath.2006.051302.
  13. Naylor, E.C.; Watson, R.E.B.; Sherratt, M.J. Molecular Aspects of Skin Ageing. Maturitas 2011, 69, 249–256, doi:10.1016/j.maturitas.2011.04.011.
  14. León-López, A.; Morales-Peñaloza, A.; Martínez-Juárez, V.M.; Vargas-Torres, A.; Zeugolis, D.I.; Aguirre-Álvarez, G. Hydrolyzed Collagen—Sources and Applications. Molecules 2019, 24, 4031, doi:10.3390/molecules24224031.
  15. Choi, F.D.; Sung, C.T.; Juhasz, M.L.; Atanaskova Mesinkovska, N. Oral Collagen Supplementation:A Systematic Review of Dermatological Applications. J. Drugs Dermatol. 2019, 18.
  16. Aguirre-Cruz, G.; León-López, A.; Cruz-Gómez, V.; Jiménez-Alvarado, R.; Aguirre-Álvarez, G. Collagen Hydrolysates for Skin Protection: Oral Administration and Topical Formulation. Antioxidants 2020, 9, 181, doi:10.3390/antiox9020181.
  17. Honvo, G.; Lengelé, L.; Charles, A.; Reginster, J.-Y.; Bruyère, O. Role of Collagen Derivatives in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Repair: A Systematic Scoping Review With Evidence Mapping. Rheumatol. Ther. 2020, 7, 703–740, doi:10.1007/s40744-020-00240-5.
  18. de Almagro, M.C. The Use of Collagen Hydrolysates and Native Collagen in Osteoarthritis. Am. J. Biomed. Sci. Res. 2020, 7, 530–532, doi:10.34297/AJBSR.2020.07.001217.
  19. Zdzieblik, D.; Oesser, S.; Gollhofer, A.; König, D. Improvement of Activity-Related Knee Joint Discomfort Following Supplementation of Specific Collagen Peptides. Appl. Physiol. Nutr. Metab. 2017, 42, 588–595, doi:10.1139/apnm-2016-0390.
  20. Zdzieblik, D.; Brame, J.; Oesser, S.; Gollhofer, A.; König, D. The Influence of Specific Bioactive Collagen Peptides on Knee Joint Discomfort in Young Physically Active Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Nutrients 2021, 13, 523, doi:10.3390/nu13020523.
  21. Feliciano, D.SL.; Gonzalez-Suarez, C.B.; Bernardo-Bueno, M.M.; Malvar, A.K.G.; Cua, R.C.A.; Tan-Sales, B.G.K.; Aycardo, S.M.O.; tan-Ong, M.; Chan, R.; De Los Reyes, F. Effect of Collagen Hydrolysate as Adjuvant Treatment to Excercise for Knee Osteoarthritis. PARM Proc. 2017, 9.
  22. Bruyère, O.; Zegels, B.; Leonori, L.; Rabenda, V.; Janssen, A.; Bourges, C.; Reginster, J.-Y. Effect of Collagen Hydrolysate in Articular Pain: A 6-Month Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled Study. Complement. Ther. Med. 2012, 20, 124–130, doi:10.1016/j.ctim.2011.12.007.
  23. Bernardo, M.L.R.; Azarcon, A.C. A Randomized Controlled Trial on the Effects of Oral Collagen Treatment on the Media) Knee Joint Space Aod Functional Outcome among Veterans Memorial Medical Center Patients Diagnosed with Osteoarthritis of the Knee. PARM Proc. 2012, 4, 9.
  24. Daneault, A.; Coxam, V.; Wittrant, Y. Biological Effect of Hydrolyzed Collagen on Bone Metabolism. Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr. 2015, 00–00, doi:10.1080/10408398.2015.1038377.
  25. König, D.; Oesser, S.; Scharla, S.; Zdzieblik, D.; Gollhofer, A. Specific Collagen Peptides Improve Bone Mineral Density and Bone Markers in Postmenopausal Women—A Randomized Controlled Study. Nutrients 2018, 10, 97, doi:10.3390/nu10010097.
Sans additifs without additives
Sans edulcorant without sweeteners
Sans sucres ajoutes No added sugar
Peche durable Sustainable fishing
Poissons sauvages wild fish
Made in france Made in france

Have a question?

Our experts answer to all your questions.

From what age is it useful to supplement collagen ?

It is estimated that in adulthood, we lose an average of 1% of collagen per year. Thus, taking collagen peptides can be useful from the age of 18!

Can I give my child collagene ?

Our formula Collagen was designed to compensate for collagen losses with age and was not developed to suit children. We advise you to ask your pediatrician for advice.

Is there collagen of plant origin ?

No, there is no such thing as plant collagen. It would even be a heresy because this protein belongs to the animal kingdom. Collagen peptides are obtained from collagen from beef, pork, poultry or fish (so called “marine” collagen). We have opted for two marine collagens from responsible fishing industries.

Does collagen act on nail and hair growth ?

As collagen is a major constituent of the skin, collagen supplementation primarily impacts the skin and will not necessarily be effective on nail growth or hair growth. For an effective action on hair growth, we recommend our dedicated formula, Millet & Vegetable Biotin.

Why not organic marine collagen ?

Unfortunately, there is no such thing as organic marine collagen. It is essentially a question of the sector because the collagen hydrolysates are obtained from fish by-products which are not currently available organically.

Do I especially need to supplement myself with collagen if I exercise ?

Indeed, the practice of sport erodes our collagen capital and can therefore put a strain on our joints, just like age. Ultimately, it is the motor skills and flexibility of our joints that are impacted. Thus, to limit this phenomenon of erosion, it can be very interesting for athletes to supplement themselves with collagen peptides.

Is the peach taste strong ?

One of the biggest challenges when developing a collagen formula is controlling the taste. For our Collagen, we have selected high quality grades and a very subtle natural peach flavor that will allow you to consume it as is in water or to integrate it into various hot or cold preparations. We have even concocted for you a little book of easy and practical recipes for every day and available with your order!

Is your Collagen effective at smoothing out wrinkles ?

Yes ! Clinical studies have shown that a supply of hydrolyzed collagen helps maintain the elasticity, tone and texture density of the skin, and therefore, effectively, reduce the appearance of wrinkles or "smooth" them.

Will I have firmer skin with your Collagen ?

Absolutely. Collagen is an essential protein for the structure of the skin dermis, and 1% of it is lost every year! Clinical studies on collagen peptide supplementation have shown an improvement in the firmness and elasticity of the skin.

I already use hyaluronic acid for the anti-aging effect, in cream or in Nutra. Is it useful to take in addition to collagen? ?

Yes ! These two assets are perfectly complementary. Hyaluronic acid is mainly involved in the hydration of the skin by capturing water molecules. Collagen improves the tone and firmness of the skin. These two compounds enter into the composition of the extracellular matrix of the dermis and are thus essential for the structure of the skin. Together, they ensure the plump appearance of the skin.

Are there any possible allergic reactions ?

The risk of allergy is mainly linked to ingredients from fish. If you are not allergic to fish then you should not develop allergic reactions and our formula is safe for shellfish allergies, since it does not contain any ingredients derived from shellfish. However, the allergic phenomenon being self-dependent, it remains specific to each one and can occur unexpectedly.

Doesn't putting it in a hot drink risk breaking down the peptides ?

No risk, our collagen peptides are stable and can be incorporated into both hot and cold drinks.

Can I mix it with my protein in a shaker ?

Absolutely ! Many athletes combine protein and collagen. Be careful though with the combination of dosages that will impact the texture

Where do our ingredients come from?

Origine des ingrédients du Magnésium
Mixture of ingredients • Nutrisun Châteaubourg, France

For more than 25 years, Nutrisun has been recognized as an expert partner in the custom development of food and nutraceutical products with specific expertise in flavoring and other organoleptic aspects.

Collagen HMG® • Copalis Development: Le Portel, France

Origin and manufacture of collagen: Alaska
Copalis is a worldwide expert cooperative in the hydrolyzed fish protein market. It puts its know-how at the service of nutraceuticals and cosmetics by enhancing the co-products of the sea, and therefore by preserving natural marine resources.

Cartidyss® • Abyss Ingredients Manufacturing: Caudan, France

Origin of collagen: France
Ingredients is a company working in the development of natural marine ingredients by combining innovation, local circular economy and sustainable development. Its vocation is to offer clinically validated nutraceutical solutions.

Peach flovor • Robertet Manufacturing: Grasse, France

100% natural, our peach flavor was developed by Robertet, a French family group founded in 1850

Map Mobile

Where do our ingredients come from?

Mixture of ingredients • Nutrisun

Châteaubourg, France

For more than 25 years, Nutrisun has been recognized as an expert partner in the custom development of food and nutraceutical products with specific expertise in flavoring and other organoleptic aspects.

HMG® Collagen • Copalis

Development: Le Portel, France

Collagen origin and manufacturing: Alaska
Copalis is a worldwide expert cooperative in the hydrolyzed fish protein market. It puts its know-how at the service of nutraceuticals and cosmetics by enhancing the co-products of the sea, and therefore by preserving natural marine resources.

Cartidyss® • Abyss Ingredients

Manufacturing: Caudan, France

Collagen origin: France
Abyss Ingredients is a company working in the development of natural marine ingredients by combining innovation, local circular economy and sustainable development. Its vocation is to offer clinically validated nutraceutical solutions.

Peach flovor • Robertet

Manufacturing: Grasse, France

B-Pharma is a recognized manufacturer in dry forms.

Our certified customer reviews

Those who we tested The Collagen approved it.
Based on 48 reviews
4,5/5
Difficile à dire : pas assez de recul
16.10.2021
au bout d'un mois de cure , douleurs articulaires disparues et j'ai l'impression que cela aide à la repousse de mes cheveux ... merci ... je recommande
15.10.2021
peau lus souple, lumineuse , tres bon produit
13.10.2021
Je l'utilise depuis une semaine, c'est évidemment trop tôt pour parler de résultats mais le goût est agréable. Il faut un peu de temps pour que la poudre se dissoude complètement.
13.10.2021
Je l'ai déjà recommandé
09.10.2021
j'ai des difficultés à apprécier l'odeur et le' gout de la poudre
07.10.2021
Je suis satisfait ,mais j'attends de voir le resy
06.10.2021
Je fais confiance par rapport aux résultats mais pas très agréable à boire,un peu pateux,gluant à boire,il reste tj des petits morceaux, mais il faut souffrir pour être belle....
04.10.2021
Il semble digeste, la conclusion de bienfaits à la fin d'utilisation.
01.10.2021
Je ferais un retour d’expérience plus tardivement
29.09.2021

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